In Zimbabwe, 48 year old woman dies from a black scorpion sting - Parabuthus transvaalicus strong culprit.

Outpost31Survivor

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Stung on the upper torso it is unreported whether or not she had pre-existing health issues or chronic illnesses such as respiratory difficulties, high blood pressure or low blood pressure, diabetes, etc.

Sad and tragic but why were they not sleeping on raised cots or erected hammocks? In Parabuthus country like Chiredzi it would also be wise to invest in a black light for use outside during the nights to navigate safely and avoid scorpions.


Zimbabwe-administrative-map.jpg Parabuthus-transvaalicus-350x350.jpg
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In Zimbabwe, where P transvaalicus stings are most common, an epidemiologic study (184 confirmed P. transvaalicus envenomations) showed that only about 10% (17) of the stings resulted in severe scorpionism, and 63% (115) of the stings resulted only in intense pain. About 27% (52) of the stings resulted in minor systemic complaints including hypersalivation, sweating, and subjective neurological symptoms. The patients with severe scorpionism demonstrated neuromuscular symptoms and cardiac involvement. Parasympathetic nervous system involvement was a prominent feature.This differs from buthid envenomation in other parts of the world, where clinical evidence of circulating catecholamines is a prominent feature (sympathetic storm). All 184 victims survived.
 
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darkness975

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Stung on the upper torso it is unreported whether or not she had pre-existing health issues or chronic illnesses such as respiratory difficulties, high blood pressure or low blood pressure, diabetes, etc.

Sad and tragic but why were they not sleeping on raised cots or erected hammocks? In Parabuthus country like Chiredzi it would also be wise to invest in a black light for use outside during the nights to navigate safely and avoid scorpions.


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In Zimbabwe, where P transvaalicus stings are most common, an epidemiologic study (184 confirmed P. transvaalicus envenomations) showed that only about 10% (17) of the stings resulted in severe scorpionism, and 63% (115) of the stings resulted only in intense pain. About 27% (52) of the stings resulted in minor systemic complaints including hypersalivation, sweating, and subjective neurological symptoms. The patients with severe scorpionism demonstrated neuromuscular symptoms and cardiac involvement. Parasympathetic nervous system involvement was a prominent feature.This differs from buthid envenomation in other parts of the world, where clinical evidence of circulating catecholamines is a prominent feature (sympathetic storm). All 184 victims survived.
Did all victims receive anti venom or did any recover on their own?
 

Dr SkyTower

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It sounds like she had no access to medical/doctors surgery. If she had, she may very well have survived the scorpion sting. Her family had to put her in a wheelbarrow and push her to a larger village/town that had medical facilities. Very sad.
 

Patherophis

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Did all victims receive anti venom or did any recover on their own?
Out of these 184 people stung by P. transvaalicus, 167 recovered at home, 17 were hospitalized and 12 were provided antivenom.
Based on additional data on lethal cases relalated to this species, it was estimated that death rate of P. transvaalicus sting is 0.3 %, with children under 10 and adult over 50 years being risk groups.
 

Patherophis

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Sad and tragic but why were they not sleeping on raised cots or erected hammocks? In Parabuthus country like Chiredzi it would also be wise to invest in a black light for use outside during the nights to navigate safely and avoid scorpions.
Man, it is about african vilagers living in hut in remoted area. I highly doubt that they have access to blacklight, or even idea what blacklight is...
 

Outpost31Survivor

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Man, it is about african vilagers living in hut in remoted area. I highly doubt that they have access to blacklight, or even idea what blacklight is...
No, it is just a simple fact P. transvaalicus will invade homes and properties while hunting insects that are attracted to lights and heat. No malice on this poor bold scorpion's part but it will exploit human habitation for its sustenance.
 

Dry Desert

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No, it is just a simple fact P. transvaalicus will invade homes and properties while hunting insects that are attracted to lights and heat. No malice on this poor bold scorpion's part but it will exploit human habitation for its sustenance.
You can no way compare or comment on situations where medical assistance is just a car/ taxi ride away to circumstances where the victim is taken in a wheelbarrow to the next nearest village for any possible hope of basic help, probably from the village chief.
 

Outpost31Survivor

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You can no way compare or comment on situations where medical assistance is just a car/ taxi ride away to circumstances where the victim is taken in a wheelbarrow to the next nearest village for any possible hope of basic help, probably from the village chief.
Where are you two getting comparisons from I am speaking of necessity alone. P. Transvaalicus stings occur quite commonly in Zimbabwe iirc more so than South Africa.

Here is an interesting article:

Scorpion – Parabuthus transvaalicus
Parabuthus transvaalicus is a black scorpion, 85-145 mm long, is one of the largest thick tailed scorpions in the world and releases more venom than any other scorpion species. When disturbed it can squirt venom from the sting over a distance of about a metre. This species scrape out a shallow retreat under rocks and logs and occur in the southern regions of Zimbabwe.

Parabuthus granulatus is a brownish scorpion, 75-115 mm long, is more slender and finely granulated than the above three species. It is the most venomous scorpion in Southern Africa yet the volume of poison released is about a third of that released by P. transvaalicus. P. granulatus lives in shallow excavations at the base of shrubs and under stones in sandy areas.


A case study of 42 serious scorpion envenomations, occurring in western Cape over 5 summers (1986/7 to 1991/2), recorded 4 fatalities of children. Parabuthus granulatus was found to be the main culprit, responsible for 3 deaths. Parabuthus capensis was the alleged culprit of the fourth death but as the specimen was lost it cannot be verified. Parabuthus transvaalicus is the major cause of serious scorpion envenomation in Zimbabwe with recorded cases of death. Parabuthus mossambicensis has also been implicated in cases of serious envenomation. All Parabuthus and especially P. kalaharicus, P. schlechteri and P. villosus must be regarded as potentially lethal.

Research on local venomous species
Research in the Western Cape was done to improve the treatment for victims stung by Buthidae scorpions as it was felt that the treatment previously administered was not very effective. Eventually the scorpions responsible for the stings were obtained when patients were stung and it was established that in the majority of cases it was Parabuthus granulatus that was responsible. Once this had been established, a more specific anti-venom was developed. This proved very successful and patients thereafter recovered rapidly from stings. In just about all the cases that were researched, patients were stung under very similar conditions - at night, not wearing shoes on gravel roads. Similar research in Zimbabwe isolated Parabuthus transvaalicus as the main culprit.

 
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Outpost31Survivor

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220px-841557643695_.pic_hd.jpg

Homesteads in Zimbabwe have remained largely unchanged since the time of Great Zimbabwe. A village in Chapungu Sculpture Park uses tall grass as a natural fence, similar to the Hill Complexes of that time. The structure of the wall combines natural and artificial elements to provide a safe space for residents. Traditional houses, especially in rural areas, still have thatched roofs with mud walls, similar to structures dating back to the stone-walled huts of Great Zimbabwe. Even earlier village huts and settlements were usually constructed from clay and sticks with conical thatched roofs. A homestead will usually consist of two huts — one for cooking and the other for sleeping.[3]

In modern times, the walls of houses are usually built of coursed, sun-dried bricks, with rectangular doorways and brush roofs. As a result of European influence, there are now rectangular buildings with concrete walls and corrugated iron roofs.[3] Walls are occasionally decorated with geometric designs that carry religious and symbolic meaning. For both security and decoration, iron fences are increasingly popular. The traditional practice of constructing high sleeping platforms, cooking benches, and seats continues today. Most storage huts are made from branches and sticks, which make them less sturdy than cooking or residential huts.[3]

During the farming season, people move from their village residences to their farmhouses. Farmhouse huts are located near the fields and consist of lean-tos made with wooden sticks, resting on stilts up to nine feet tall and accessed via ladders. They are sturdy enough to support an entire family.[3]

Residential arrangement
Residential areas generally consist of circular huts arranged around an open space, which serves as a courtyard for fire-making and revealing the presence of wild animals or other intruders. For the ruling classes, stone walls surround the family areas.[3] Kitchens are always built in the center of each family area, with a well-decorated and painted sleeping hut nearby. There are also spaces for livestock and storage, with granaries built high-up to prevent dampness and deter insects and rodents.[3]

 

Outpost31Survivor

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Did all victims receive anti venom or did any recover on their own?
It is too late to edit the original post but here is the epidemiological study on Zimbabwe scorpion stings:


Further reading:


 
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