Important Conservation Efforts...

Tarantulaguy2001

Arachnopeon
Joined
Jul 29, 2016
Messages
9
I am wondering of it is legall to capture, tag, breed, then release wild P. Metallica tarantulas. This is for conservational efforts only. My goal is to make sure this species gets and stays off of the endangered species list. I would release them after about 10000+ are scurrying around in tanks.
 

antinous

Pamphopharaoh
Joined
Mar 28, 2013
Messages
1,464
It's good that you want to help their numbers out in the wild, but your plan wouldn't exactly work. I do know of someone (forgot their name) who tags A. laeta (I think) to track their movements. Where will you get the money to tag all of them? Even if you do tag a majority of them, they would be 'bogged' down by the weight of the tag itself. Not only that, but their numbers are also going down due to habitat destruction. You would have to relocate the people living there to recreate the forests that make up their natural homes and who's willing to cover those fees? Don't mean to rain on your parade at all, I'm all for conservation after all as well!


I'm really glad there are people like you who are interested in arachnid conservation!
 

Tarantulaguy2001

Arachnopeon
Joined
Jul 29, 2016
Messages
9
It's good that you want to help their numbers out in the wild, but your plan wouldn't exactly work. I do know of someone (forgot their name) who tags A. laeta (I think) to track their movements. Where will you get the money to tag all of them? Even if you do tag a majority of them, they would be 'bogged' down by the weight of the tag itself. Not only that, but their numbers are also going down due to habitat destruction. You would have to relocate the people living there to recreate the forests that make up their natural homes and who's willing to cover those fees? Don't mean to rain on your parade at all, I'm all for conservation after all as well!


I'm really glad there are people like you who are interested in arachnid conservation!
Microscopic tags. The funding will come from charity. I will advertise through apps I am making. I will get others to join. More money, more tags, Moe ads, more charity.
 

antinous

Pamphopharaoh
Joined
Mar 28, 2013
Messages
1,464
Microscopic tags. The funding will come from charity. I will advertise through apps I am making. I will get others to join. More money, more tags, Moe ads, more charity.
My apologies, I took it as tracking tags. What about their natural range? With it being changed into farmland/village expansion, how would you compete against that? As sad as it is to say, not many people are thrilled with the idea of spider conservation when there are larger, more popular animals out there as well. Then there comes the issue of import/export laws, which will be pretty pricey as well.
 

Vanessa

Grammostola Groupie
Arachnosupporter
Joined
Mar 12, 2016
Messages
2,393
The gene pool might be too small at this point to breed that large a number from. You would need to introduce a larger gene pool, from WC individuals in order to get that high a number. Repopulating a species is usually done in smaller amounts with the hopes that the captive bred population eventually assimilates with the wild one without human intervention. Flooding an area with all captive bred will maintain that population for the short term, but won't be successful in long term maintaining.
Although they come from an area of the world that is very highly populated, there are some remote areas that might be successful to repopulate in. However, you would need to first ensure that repopulating those areas would not result in other species being eliminated... species that might not even be recorded yet.
Then, there is the possibility of hybrid individuals contaminating pure wild populations. That would defeat the purpose as well.
I'm not saying that you can't do it - it's not impossible and you have lots of years ahead of you to make this happen.
 

Poec54

Arachnoemperor
Joined
Mar 26, 2013
Messages
4,763
The problem is that most forests have been cleared in India to support the huge human population. They cut them down which kills the animals that depend on them. Where would you release CBB Poec slings back into the wild, and how long would it before those threes are cut down? India's not going to let people bring in spiders anyways. The British Tarantula Society has a true passion for Poecilotheria, and they've tried for many years to promote their conservation efforts in India, and gotten little cooperation.

There was a population of hundreds P. hanuma that was wiped out about 10 years ago when a forest was cut down in SE India. No rescue or relocation, they don't care. Locals usually kill them on sight anyways. But, try to take a few out of the country for a captive breeding program, and you can get throw in jail. It politics and bureaucrats don't care about what's best for the spiders. The best thing India could do is plant millions of fast-growing trees, but most would probably be cut by the locals before they got up to size. The human population is outpacing the natural resources. That's the problem, and until that's under control, they'll keep consuming everything.
 

Tenevanica

Arachnodemon
Joined
Feb 18, 2015
Messages
727
No way is there enough wild Poecotheria metallica to breed from in just the wild. The species is doomed in the wild. You could introduce captive bred individuals into the wild if you could get the permits. This sounds like a long shot though. Also, how are you going to have the time to individually feed and take care of thousands of slings by yourself? Would you hire volunteers?

Personally, I'd start smaller. We don't know for sure how large the wild population of this species is. An estimation of the number of would individuals would be a massive help to conservation efforts. An easy Lincoln Peterson mark recapture test would be the best thing you could do IMO.

Also, I'm not normally a stickler about this, but if you're going to do this you should at least learn the correct way to write a scientific name. Poecilotheria metallica or Poecilotheria metallica are the correct ways to write the name. The genus name should be capitalized and the species name should be lower case. The whole name should be underlined or italicized. The binomial P. metallica is less formal and should be avoided in scientific writings. You're papers will look more professional if you use these rules.
 

cold blood

Moderator
Staff member
Joined
Jan 19, 2014
Messages
11,892
No way is there enough wild Poecotheria metallica to breed from in just the wild. The species is doomed in the wild. You could introduce captive bred individuals into the wild if you could get the permits. This sounds like a long shot though. Also, how are you going to have the time to individually feed and take care of thousands of slings by yourself? Would you hire volunteers?

Personally, I'd start smaller. We don't know for sure how large the wild population of this species is. An estimation of the number of would individuals would be a massive help to conservation efforts. An easy Lincoln Peterson mark recapture test would be the best thing you could do IMO.

Also, I'm not normally a stickler about this, but if you're going to do this you should at least learn the correct way to write a scientific name. Poecilotheria metallica or Poecilotheria metallica are the correct ways to write the name. The genus name should be capitalized and the species name should be lower case. The whole name should be underlined or italicized. The binomial P. metallica is less formal and should be avoided in scientific writings. You're papers will look more professional if you use these rules.
Actually only the species is in italics. Poecilotheria metallica.
 

Tenevanica

Arachnodemon
Joined
Feb 18, 2015
Messages
727
Actually only the species is in italics. Poecilotheria metallica.
I don't think that's correct. Here's two random studies that use scientific names: (Their content has no significance, they're just the first ones I could pull up on my computer.)

http://titag.org/2015/2015papers/palmercaptiverearing.pdf

http://www.academia.edu/7243261/Cou...on_of_the_Pronotum_in_Lucihormetica_verrucosa

Notice that both the genus and species is italicized. Both the genus and species being italicized is also what I've been taught in my biology classes since high school.
 

Chris LXXIX

ArachnoGod
Active Member
Joined
Dec 25, 2014
Messages
5,689
Actually only the species is in italics. Poecilotheria metallica.
Nope my man :angelic:

Poecilotheria metallica <--- this is correct

not Poecilotheria metallica, Poecilotheria metallica, poecilotheria Metallica, Poecilotheria Metallica or what else :)
 

Chris LXXIX

ArachnoGod
Active Member
Joined
Dec 25, 2014
Messages
5,689
The problem is that most forests have been cleared in India to support the huge human population.
Or to support mere speculation business, like happens in Southern Italy. Lot of woods burned down on purpose, for build brand new 'Mafia/Politicians connected' Hotels and what else.
 

Vanessa

Grammostola Groupie
Arachnosupporter
Joined
Mar 12, 2016
Messages
2,393
The human population is outpacing the natural resources. That's the problem, and until that's under control, they'll keep consuming everything.
Don't you mean until we're under control, we'll keep consuming everything?
The number one cause of deforestation and loss of wildlife in all the Americas is the clearing of trees to farm livestock animals on the cleared land. It is happening in South America, it is happening in the U.S., and it is happening in Canada.
Bison, wild horses, wolves, cougar, lynx, and countless other species are at risk, or even gone, from some areas to free them up for livestock and livestock farms and wildlife are constantly being subjected to wholesale slaughter due to predators presenting a risk to young livestock animals.
If you contribute to the raising of livestock, you are contributing to the loss of wildlife - regardless of where you live in the world.
 

jiacovazzi

Arachnoknight
Joined
Aug 14, 2014
Messages
164
Don't you mean until we're under control, we'll keep consuming everything?
The number one cause of deforestation and loss of wildlife in all the Americas is the clearing of trees to farm livestock animals on the cleared land. It is happening in South America, it is happening in the U.S., and it is happening in Canada.
Bison, wild horses, wolves, cougar, lynx, and countless other species are at risk, or even gone, from some areas to free them up for livestock and livestock farms and wildlife are constantly being subjected to wholesale slaughter due to predators presenting a risk to young livestock animals.
If you contribute to the raising of livestock, you are contributing to the loss of wildlife - regardless of where you live in the world.
Exactly, assuming he is a part of the human population.
 
Top