Illogical to order...

Kat Maehl

Arachnopeon
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Apr 18, 2017
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I just got an email back from the USA wildlife and fishery people. It would cost almost $300 to import a $10 spider.

Might just get a spider from the university of Costa Rica. Seems a $2 bus to and from is a better deal. Might get a L. Parahybana when I get to the states someday.

Just updating because I know some of you had helped me out with trying to get info.
 

Chris LXXIX

ArachnoGod
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Ah ah, no offence but the irony in all of this is that Lasiodora parahybana are ridiculously cheap Theraphosidae :banghead: only to think to pay $300 for one of those is something not even logical during a Theraphosidae World War 'black market' sort of.
 

Kat Maehl

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Right? It might be just cheaper to fly down to Brazil, find one and smuggle it over the boarder xD I kid, I kid.

I love C. Fasciatum, so if I can find a bit old female I'd be happy.
 

AntlerAlchemist

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Apr 4, 2017
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You are lucky enough to live where there are wild tarantulas, at least you were able to find a few on your own :) $300 to import a spider seems ridiculous! I've been wanting to find a few different Aphonopelma species around the American Southwest. I currently have an A. chalcodes. But I wouldn't mind finding an A. hentzi or A. moderatum!
 

Kat Maehl

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You are lucky enough to live where there are wild tarantulas, at least you were able to find a few on your own :) $300 to import a spider seems ridiculous! I've been wanting to find a few different Aphonopelma species around the American Southwest. I currently have an A. chalcodes. But I wouldn't mind finding an A. hentzi or A. moderatum!
You're right, I am very lucky. For once in my life I'm grateful for living here.
I've got a lot to learn, but paying $300 buckaroos is nuts.
 

AntlerAlchemist

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Here in Arizona we just have the terrestrial tarantulas. Didn't I read that you had an arboreal species? Those seem pretty cool too! Although maybe slightly harder to keep?
 

Chris LXXIX

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Well but you mentioned the U.S wildlife & whatnot agencies, therefore the USA 'side' and their prices/taxes. What about breeders T's seller in Central America? I mean... out of curiosity, doesn't exists in Belize and other neighbour nations people into T's that can offer better deals?
 

Kat Maehl

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Apr 18, 2017
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Well but you mentioned the U.S wildlife & whatnot agencies, therefore the USA 'side' and their prices/taxes. What about breeders T's seller in Central America? I mean... out of curiosity, doesn't exists in Belize and other neighbour nations people into T's that can offer better deals?
I've found no evidence of breeders anywhere near here. :(
 

Chris LXXIX

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I've found no evidence of breeders anywhere near here. :(
That sucks, Lady... that sucks!

We definitely need a Rafael Caro Quintero*, Pablo Escobar*, El Norte* etc of Theraphosidae! Patria -- of Aranha -- o Muerte!

* Aren't, after all, according to the general consensus, Theraphosidae... a drug? lol

Tony "Lasiodora parahybana" Montana! :)
 

CALovett

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Ah ah, no offence but the irony in all of this is that Lasiodora parahybana are ridiculously cheap Theraphosidae :banghead: only to think to pay $300 for one of those is something not even logical during a Theraphosidae World War 'black market' sort of.
Well, considering the prodigious amount of offspring a Lasiodora parahybana can have, importing a mating pair could prove itself to be a benefit both financially and (of course) for the sake of the bloodlines. Reintroducing some fresh, wild genes could do the CB population some good.
 

Chris LXXIX

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Well, considering the prodigious amount of offspring a Lasiodora parahybana can have, importing a mating pair could prove itself to be a benefit both financially and (of course) for the sake of the bloodlines. Reintroducing some fresh, wild genes could do the CB population some good.
I don't know. If they asked $300 to her for a sinlge specimen, two would cost more (maybe I'm wrong, dunno) still $300 on a Lasiodora parahybana is nonsense on my book.

But, no matter... what "you" would do with that load of slings, after, if you can't easily trade/sell etc those, one moment... if in Costa Rica the hobby is little or even not present? :-s
 

CALovett

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I don't know. If they asked $300 to her for a sinlge specimen, two would cost more (maybe I'm wrong, dunno) still $300 on a Lasiodora parahybana is nonsense on my book.

But, no matter... what "you" would do with that load of slings, after, if you can't easily trade/sell etc those, one moment... if in Costa Rica the hobby is little or even not present? :-s
It was more of an abstract thought, since Lasiodora parahybana is not, to the best of my knowledge, found that far north. Still, there are other interesting species there which I would personally love to see more in the hobby. She found one that I suspect is a Psalmopoeus reduncus, and it's beautiful. I want it, even though I suspect it would most likely end up causing me some significant pain at some point in the future. Not sure if P. reduncus has the same potency as P. irminia, but being that they're the same genus I'm inclined to treat them as though they do.

Anyway, I digress. My understanding of it is that in order to import spiders for the purpose of business, you require an import license costing roughly $100 USD. On top of that, when importing the spider(s), you will pay an additional +/- $100 USD inspection fee per specimen. So realistically, importing a single LP to the USA from anywhere would cost about $200. Not totally sure where @Kat Maehl got the $300 number, though maybe she can shed some light on that.
 

Chris LXXIX

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It was more of an abstract thought, since Lasiodora parahybana is not, to the best of my knowledge, found that far north. Still, there are other interesting species there which I would personally love to see more in the hobby. She found one that I suspect is a Psalmopoeus reduncus, and it's beautiful. I want it, even though I suspect it would most likely end up causing me some significant pain at some point in the future. Not sure if P. reduncus has the same potency as P. irminia, but being that they're the same genus I'm inclined to treat them as though they do.

Anyway, I digress. My understanding of it is that in order to import spiders for the purpose of business, you require an import license costing roughly $100 USD. On top of that, when importing the spider(s), you will pay an additional +/- $100 USD inspection fee per specimen. So realistically, importing a single LP to the USA from anywhere would cost about $200. Not totally sure where @Kat Maehl got the $300 number, though maybe she can shed some light on that.
I don't know either (I'm Italian and I'm not in full knowledge like you about US import/export prices-taxes and whatnot) but the problem IMO remains... when you live in a nation that isn't too much in the hobby things can be difficult.

For instance: why, if "I" live in Costa Rica, I have to order a L.parahybana (hands down one of the common and cheap Theraphosidae ever, even if I personally like those) from the U.S, in the first place? Doesn't exist someone that, in Costa Rica, or in a neighbour nation, can sell/ship that to me?

Now, now... of course I don't have a clue about Costa Rica CB T's keepers and how the T's hobby is in the country but if "you" can't find one within the nation IMO isn't that good, uh.
 

CALovett

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I don't know either (I'm Italian and I'm not in full knowledge like you about US import/export prices-taxes and whatnot) but the problem IMO remains... when you live in a nation that isn't too much in the hobby things can be difficult.

For instance: why, if "I" live in Costa Rica, I have to order a L.parahybana (hands down one of the common and cheap Theraphosidae ever, even if I personally like those) from the U.S, in the first place? Doesn't exist someone that, in Costa Rica, or in a neighbour nation, can sell/ship that to me?

Now, now... of course I don't have a clue about Costa Rica CB T's keepers and how the T's hobby is in the country but if "you" can't find one within the nation IMO isn't that good, uh.
My, my. You're up late, aren't you, amico? Isn't it about midnight over there right now?

From my talks with Kat, there simply are no CB L. parahybana specimens in Costa Rica. If there are, they seem to be impossible to find. I know nothing about importing spiders from the US to Costa Rica, on the other hand. Still, I suspect it will be similarly prohibitive.
 

cold blood

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You are lucky enough to live where there are wild tarantulas, at least you were able to find a few on your own :) $300 to import a spider seems ridiculous!
To me $300 seems crazy cheap to import...here in the states legally importing is usually in the thousands...which is why you don't see people making personal orders from over seas.

It was more of an abstract thought, since Lasiodora parahybana is not, to the best of my knowledge, found that far north. Still, there are other interesting species there which I would personally love to see more in the hobby. She found one that I suspect is a Psalmopoeus reduncus, and it's beautiful. I want it, even though I suspect it would most likely end up causing me some significant pain at some point in the future. Not sure if P. reduncus has the same potency as P. irminia, but being that they're the same genus I'm inclined to treat them as though they do.
Yeah all Psalms have a little more potent venom....reduncus aren't all that large or defensive....and any Psalm is 100 times cooler than an LP....I'm always shocked at new keepers magical love for the LP....lol....I avoid the LP like it was the plague...seeking them out, to me, is a laughable endeavor. Like going out on a mad search to locate a dandelion in a suburb.

If I were you OP, I would just spend a lot of time searching for a couple in the back yard. I'm sure you have a few ts local that are cooler than an LP...lol.
 

johnny quango

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May 17, 2013
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262
Megaphobema mesomelas (Costa rican red leg) is in my opinion one of the most beautiful tarantulas period
 
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