If you see these "two cherries"...

LaRiz

Arachnodemon
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672
...you have a male. Pedipalpal bulbs on a Poecilotheria regalis.
john
 

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Weapon-X

Arachnodemon
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re

well heck that makes it easy, cool, thanks for the pic man, i have a question though, do haplopelma minax males have hooks or pedipals?, thanks ---jeff
 

LaRiz

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Re: re

Originally posted by Weapon-X
well heck that makes it easy, cool, thanks for the pic man, i have a question though, do haplopelma minax males have hooks or pedipals?, thanks ---jeff
All male tarantulas upon their ultimate, or last molt, will emerge with palpal bulbs. These are used to "inject" stored sperm into the female upon mating. Tibial spurs/hooks are used by some tarantulas as an aid to hook the female, usually by the fangs. This will help position the male for a better shot at the female's good bits.
Not all male tarantulas will have these spurs/hooks (tibial apophyses). It is my understanding that males of the genus Haplopelma will have tibial hooks when matured.
john
 

Midwest Art

Arachnoknight
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Palps

Avic species such as versicolor do not actually have "hooks". I bought one over the summer sold as a "female" but low and behold, pedipalps. My current male versi gets the Keith Moon award for drumming, he drums with one palp and hooks with the other, then switches palps.

Mature males are fun except when you have a rare or unidentified species such as P. striata (pictured) or P. pederseni. Sometimes a date is hard to find.

N-Joy
Art
 
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LaRiz

Arachnodemon
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Re: Palps

Originally posted by Midwest Art
Avic species such as versicolor do not actually have "hooks". I bought one over the summer sold as a "female" but low and behold, pedipalps. My current male versi gets the Keith Moon award for drumming, he drums with one palp and hooks with the other, then switches palps.

Mature males are fun except when you have a rare or unidentified species such as P. striata (pictured) or P. pederseni. Sometimes a date is hard to find.

N-Joy
Art
I thought Avicularia is a genus, in which males did possess tibial hooks. A. versicolor was the first species I managed to breed, but it was so long ago, I can't remember.
P. striata and P. pederseni females are just not mature yet here in the US, as you know. I have males of both species up and coming :(
Also, mature males look so different from females there's sometimes some confusion. P. regalis is easy 'cause of the belly band.
 

Code Monkey

Arachnoemperor
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Versicolor has spurs but they're not exactly very "hooky". It's one of the controversial elements about whether all these Avicularia really are Avicularia or some similar genus.
 

VI6SIX

Arachnosquire
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every mature avic I've encountered has had hooks little but they were there
 

betelgeuse

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Most arboreal species either have small tibial hooks or none at all. It is thought that the hooks impede their need for good mobility amongst the treetops.

Also, (this is just my own unproven theory) the tibial hooks are used to push the female up and to manoever her fangs. In an arboreal mating, such manoevering may cause the female to lose her balance and fall. No good for the survival of the species. If my theory is true, does anybody notice any difference between mating procedures between arboreal and terrestrial tarantulas. For example, if my theory is correct, then I would imagine that an arboreal mating would be a "quick in and out" process as this would minimise risk of a fall in the wild. Whereas, a terrestrial mating would be longer as the mating would usually take place in the secure environment of a female's burrow with no risk of fall et cetera.
 
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