If you could get Australian T's, would you?

RezonantVoid

Hollow Knight
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Now it's no secret us Aussies are often wanting all the pretty exotic T's with those vivid blue hues and and fluffy legs, but to what extent does this go the other way? How many of you reading would actually pick up some of our natives if the chance legally presented itself? Are they just another old bunch of brown OW T's, or are they all beautiful regardless of their colouring and a must-have? Would they be worth the potent venom or far too dangerous in a foreign household? Ill add photos of each genus if anybody would like to see, but thought this would be an interesting topic
 

cold blood

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I want the rattlesnake tarantula.....probably more than any t I have ever seen or heard of.
 

AphonopelmaTX

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Considering a few Australian species exist in captivity outside of Australia today, I would say yes, there are some of us non Aussies that would have them. I used to have a couple of what was sold as Selenocosmia crassipes many years ago when they were exported legally into America. I didn't find them to be any different than other species from the pacific islands, but the novelty of having an Australian species was nice.
 

RezonantVoid

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I want the rattlesnake tarantula.....probably more than any t I have ever seen or heard of.
Dont worry, all us Aussies do except nobody leaks where they are found. More infuriating still, nobody that does end up with them ever shows any information or photos online. The closest species you could readily find available would be Selenotholus Kotzman, very loud hissers. Im one to firmly believe the Rattlesnake T is a subgenus of sorts from Selenotholus.

But lets be honest, the giant floodplain tarantulas from Northern Territory, which spend several months underwater, are probably way cooler.
 

spideyspinneret78

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Actually, I would like to get one sometime in the future to add to my collection, especially S. crassipes. At this point, though, I don't know that much about them. From what I do know, they seem interesting.
 

RezonantVoid

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Considering a few Australian species exist in captivity outside of Australia today, I would say yes, there are some of us non Aussies that would have them. I used to have a couple of what was sold as Selenocosmia crassipes many years ago when they were exported legally into America. I didn't find them to be any different than other species from the pacific islands, but the novelty of having an Australian species was nice.
Yea i believe Crassipes is still bred and circulated overseas. However, we have alot more unique looking ones too such as Selenotholus and Selenotypus. The latter i class as a true Aussie T genus because their build is shared by very few others. While they arent as large and dont web as much as Phlogius and Selenocosmia, they are probably personal favorites 20200517_123127.jpg
S.Wallace

Actually, I would like to get one sometime in the future to add to my collection, especially S. crassipes. At this point, though, I don't know that much about them. From what I do know, they seem interesting.
Crassipes are a very fun species. Always outside, web alot and have great feeding responses 20200504_210654.jpg 20200424_094225.jpg
 

Arthroverts

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Dont worry, all us Aussies do except nobody leaks where they are found. More infuriating still, nobody that does end up with them ever shows any information or photos online. The closest species you could readily find available would be Selenotholus Kotzman, very loud hissers. Im one to firmly believe the Rattlesnake T is a subgenus of sorts from Selenotholus.

But lets be honest, the giant floodplain tarantulas from Northern Territory, which spend several months underwater, are probably way cooler.
Ay, there are some mighty fine brown spiders that may glisten in the southern sun, but I would much prefer the floodplain species, or, dare I say it, the mysterious orange arboreal species that may be found in Western Australia...
...even so I could probably be easily swayed into purchasing a few Selenotypus or Selenotholus (Selenocosmia do not appeal as much to me as these two genera do) if the price was right.

But overall I would be after your primitives, and less your tarantulas.

Thanks,

Arthroverts
 

Poonjab

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The Australian golden orb weaver its a spider but similar xD
You gotta work your way up first. Gotta get used to the new world species first before you step up to the old worlds. The speed at which they web is faster than NW weavers. An inexperienced keeper will likely make a mistake and end up wrapped up and the lunch of a golden orb weaver.
 
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Arthroverts

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For anyone wondering just how badly we classify new species, not even i had any clue about this until 10 seconds ago
I actually knew something about Australian tarantulas that ol' Rezonant didn't? What a feat!

In all seriousness however I have only heard one second-hand report on this; I sure hope it's true, but it could just be an unfounded rumor. Either way more research is needed...

Thanks,

Arthroverts
 

Pep48ito

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Once I gain more experience, I'd certainly enjoy Australian specimens if I could come across them legally. I've had a T for 10 years but really only nosedived into this hobby a few days ago! There are so many cool animals from all over the world.
 

EtienneN

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I feel like crassipes were easier to come by in the States awhile, like a few years ago, back. I kind of wish I had gotten one then as I've looked for them since and everyone was always sold out. And if other Aussie native Ts were available I'd get a couple Selenotypus as well just for good measure. ;)
 

ignithium

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Especially I think funnel webs are amazing, I would love to have. For australian species, I have hasseltis and its my favourite latrodectus sp. I am also wishing for the new zealand latrodectus sp.

its crazy to have ocean on all side of you! i am from siberia and at a point in czechia, both with no coastline. I heard even australia have fish the size of bear that can attacking you sometimes. Also i was check on instagram, and most of the best of models is from Adelaide. Really i will move to australia immediately, if not for i must leave behind all of my animal!

They have taipan at moscow zoo, its most incredible snake. And im heard there are many snake like this in Australia. Its elapid with hemotoxin, like blessing from my dream.

Once I was on holiday in germany and i took girl to aquarium, they show us jellyfish from australia. I have watch before the program of "Steve Irvin" so it was still interested to me, but for my girl she seem like she have existential crisis about this animal, she cant believe it actually is existing. Actually her whole personality change for the worse after this, its as though her eyes were open now and she is no longer Siberska village girl, now she want to travel the world and do many new experiences, even she got tattoo of jellyfish under her arm. so now for future i dont taking girl to aquarium any more, or to germany either just to be on safe side.

Shortly after we have broken up, i didn't see her but i heard she has gone to Spain (i dont know where this is but i heard also it has many coastlines, like australia, and probably jellyfish also). A few year later im walking down street in Novosibirsk drunk at 2pm and i have seen her, she is beautiful as always but now she is dress like goth. I smoke a cigarette with her but she has boyfriend now, he is like 160 cm and he has very bad fake australian accent, i think perhaps he has gone there for like 1 year or something but he definitely smelled romanian and not australian (there was mormon missionary from australia whom i have met in russia, she smelled very nice and definitely not romanian). I asked him what is capital city of australia as test to see if hes fake, but unfortunately also i didnt know the answer to this so it kindn of was not a very good measure for determining.,

After this I decide to name one of my tarantula after this girl, the most aggressive one that i have owned, which is Theraposa blondi (however this girl was brown hair like true russian). So as you can see we have to blame Australia that i have large spider name sasha instead of actual sasha.

But its more or less okay because there are many sasha in the world. And for multiple reasons, as I have articulated, Australia has some positives as well.


So you ask do i wanting to have australian tarantula? There you have my answer!
 

viper69

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Now it's no secret us Aussies are often wanting all the pretty exotic T's with those vivid blue hues and and fluffy legs, but to what extent does this go the other way? How many of you reading would actually pick up some of our natives if the chance legally presented itself? Are they just another old bunch of brown OW T's, or are they all beautiful regardless of their colouring and a must-have? Would they be worth the potent venom or far too dangerous in a foreign household? Ill add photos of each genus if anybody would like to see, but thought this would be an interesting topic

I want a Spiny Echidna
 

RezonantVoid

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I want a Spiny Echidna
We literally saw one walking across the road like 2 days ago, first one ive seen in years. I have a mate with one that uproots the garden in a frenzy of flying dirt and snorting every month
 

viper69

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We literally saw one walking across the road like 2 days ago, first one ive seen in years. I have a mate with one that uproots the garden in a frenzy of flying dirt and snorting every month
WOW, the only thing similar we have is a porcupine. SO people own them?? Or it lives nearby?

And if koalas were actually friendly, man, I'd get one too!!
 
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