ID spider as well as advice for care, thanks!

themarkofsnm

Arachnopeon
Joined
Jan 1, 2017
Messages
3
Hello! new here, was curious for help on spider ID as well as care advice...we found her this past summer. When it took off cold, I searched habitats and set one up for indoors. She's been eating crickets, and has recently(last day or two) burrowed and created an egg sack that's attached to her abdomen. I can't really get a picture of her as is, since she's semi-burrowed.

THANKS!


 

chanda

Arachnoking
Old Timer
Joined
Jun 27, 2010
Messages
2,060
That is a wolf spider, possibly a Tigrosa species such as Tigrosa helluo or a close relative.

It looks like you're doing a good job with her. Just keep feeding her crickets (they will continue to eat while they have eggs/babies) - and try to baby-proof her enclosure now rather than waiting until after the babies hatch. The spiderlings will ride around on Mom's abdomen for a week or two after hatching - but they will hop off and wander around from time to time, especially as they get older. The baby spiders are excellent climbers and are able to get out of anything with decent-sized openings, including the ventilation in the top of a Critter Keeper, good-sized air holes, large-mesh screen, or gaps around doors or other openings.
 

themarkofsnm

Arachnopeon
Joined
Jan 1, 2017
Messages
3
Thanks! the boys(the 10 yo entomologist is the one who "keeps" her, but I oversee) and I were just talking about getting some tulle for the top, to help keep babies in? we used the tulle for our slug babies and it worked. we also plan on setting up a couple smaller containers for some babies- IF they hatch...I thought it was awesome she created an egg sack until I thought "AH! Babies!" :D

I'm not a fan of spiders in the house, but with an entomologist son, I've learned to adapt...some...

thanks!!!
 

Python

Arachnolord
Old Timer
Joined
Mar 21, 2005
Messages
631
Looks very similar to one I have. Mine dropped a sac as well but ate it after a couple of weeks carrying it around. She has never refused food and is probably the most aggressive eater that I have at the moment. Keep it at room temps and feed and water it and that's about it. Almost as easy to keep as a pet rock but far cooler.
 

Garth Vader

Arachnobaron
Arachnosupporter
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Jun 25, 2016
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436
That's very cool that you do these projects with your entymologist son! This must be very interesting for him!
 

Wolfspidurguy

Arachnobaron
Joined
Feb 1, 2017
Messages
548
Hello! new here, was curious for help on spider ID as well as care advice...we found her this past summer. When it took off cold, I searched habitats and set one up for indoors. She's been eating crickets, and has recently(last day or two) burrowed and created an egg sack that's attached to her abdomen. I can't really get a picture of her as is, since she's semi-burrowed.

THANKS!


I actually have a question of my own... I want to keep a wolf spider as a pet, but I can't find one bit I keep on finding there burrows. My question is: I've seen people in youtube who put sticks into there burrows and the spider bites the stick and they pull it out of the burrow. If I were to do this could I still keep the spider and handle it or would it hate me so reverse and bite me everyour time I tried to handle it? O_O
 

ReignofInvertebrates

Arachnoangel
Active Member
Joined
Dec 29, 2012
Messages
941
I actually have a question of my own... I want to keep a wolf spider as a pet, but I can't find one bit I keep on finding there burrows. My question is: I've seen people in youtube who put sticks into there burrows and the spider bites the stick and they pull it out of the burrow. If I were to do this could I still keep the spider and handle it or would it hate me so reverse and bite me everyour time I tried to handle it? O_O
Spiders don't take things personally, and you're not going to be able to "tame" one, so whether or not you try to get the spider out of its burrow doesn't really matter. Handling wolf spiders is generally bite-free but gravid females can be pretty defensive and quite fast. I recommend pouring small amounts of water into the burrow until it comes out instead.
 

Wolfspidurguy

Arachnobaron
Joined
Feb 1, 2017
Messages
548
Thanks
Spiders don't take things personally, and you're not going to be able to "tame" one, so whether or not you try to get the spider out of its burrow doesn't really matter. Handling wolf spiders is generally bite-free but gravid females can be pretty defensive and quite fast. I recommend pouring small amounts of water into the burrow until it comes out instead.
 
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