I want to have a Cyriopagopus lividus some day

Nibbles

Arachnopeon
Joined
Jul 28, 2022
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10
I appreciate their beauty but also understand the damage they’ll do without respect and extreme caution. As a beginner, I’d 𝘯𝘦𝘷𝘦𝘳 attempt to own one now. What are some species I should have experience with before considering a cobalt?
 

NMTs

Arachno-afflicted
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Jan 22, 2022
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487
Psalmopeous and Ephebopus would probably be good new world species to keep before getting into Asian fossorial species, just to get a taste of the speed and attitude. After them, start with an OW like Orphnaecus phillipinus first.
 

Smotzer

Arachnoemperor
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I second owning a Psalmopoeus and raising it to maturity before getting a Cryriopagopus, to get used to speed.
 

The Grym Reaper

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Ephebopus spp. are the most similar in terms of husbandry and temperament without the venom potency so I would consider them the best "bridge genus" if you're looking into getting OW fossorials down the line
 

Chris LXXIX

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Dec 25, 2014
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5,861
A seemanni and H gigas?
No. While the care is similar, based upon my experience, H. gigas are among the most shy T's species out there. The minimum noise, when they are out nearby the burrow entrance at night, is enough for having those retreat 360° down in their burrow in a blink of an eye. Only when/during a rehouse - which is a non issue in the case of adult females - you can observe, obviously, their defensiveness level.

Pelinobius muticus (again, as adult females) are way more defensive to the point of remaining 15 minutes in a threat pose, hissing like crazy, if the rare option of escape in the burrow isn't considered fast. I witnessed all of the above and was impressive.

My H. lividum (C. lividus) unpacking was among the most cautionous unpacking I ever had. The spider tried to bite me, more than once within seconds, even in the 'reversal' threat pose.

I do suggest to the OP to gain a bit of experience with 'medium level' African baboons like C. marshalli, C. darlingi etc and, as said above, Ephebopus spp.

This species, and the whole former Haplopelma spp., are indeed beautiful but are extremely defensive.

Some pics of mine:

C. lividus 1.jpg

C. lividus 3.jpg

C. lividus 4.jpg
 

viper69

ArachnoGod
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Dec 8, 2006
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16,001
I appreciate their beauty but also understand the damage they’ll do without respect and extreme caution. As a beginner, I’d 𝘯𝘦𝘷𝘦𝘳 attempt to own one now. What are some species I should have experience with before considering a cobalt?
google ladder system!!!!!!!
 
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