I just got a pink-toe tarantula and I need help

ISBW

Arachnopeon
Joined
Feb 2, 2011
Messages
4
{D I just got a pink-toe tarantula and I have lots of questions.
1. How deep should the terrain be?
2. Humidity and temperature?
3. I put a piece of driftwood I got shaped like a V, to climb on; is that enough?
4. Can I put a plant in so I can spray that for right humidity?
5. Rosebud (the ends of her feet look like that to me) ate a half dozen small crickets that were placed in her home (5-1/2 gallon tank) and they are completely gone. Don't they leave cricket parts or was she starving?
6. How often and how much should I feed her?
7. When I had anoles I kept crickets in a container with food, being told if crickets had nutrients in them, the anoles would get "healthier" food. I then placed some crickets in a baggie with white vitamin powder, shook them up (I called it shake and bake), and the crickets were easily seen on the brown terrain. Can I do that with Rosebud?
8. So you don't think I know nothing, I have a good adviser but I wanted to ask these questions and get your answers. She is happy on top of the driftwood, head down. She can't see anybody so maybe she thinks she is hiding. :D
9. There is a heater underneath the tank, a shallow water dish, the climbing branches, and a plant if I can do that. Am I set to go?
10. Last question for now. She's got fangs! I plan on slowly placing my arm in her home like a stick until she feels comfortable to climb my arm. My goal is to eventually be able to occasionally take her out and in the middle of my bed let her climb my arm and be petted. Will she tolerate this? Thanks everyone. {D
 

Lolita

Arachnoknight
Joined
Jan 9, 2011
Messages
185
yikes where to begin, most of your questions can be answered with care sheets on the avics so i'll only focus on the emergent questions. should you calcium powder the crickets? heck no those vitamins while good for herps are extremely bad for inverts. As far as your under tank heater goes thats a huge no no unless you want fried tarantula. Handling might be an issue (this is a highly debated topic personally i occasionally handle mine) if this is your first T your pink toe might be intimidating because avics are crazy fast and will run quickly there are handling tips on this board though as well
 

Fran

Arachnoprince
Old Timer
Joined
Nov 8, 2007
Messages
1,533
Please use the search function. If after you do some research you have any questions, I will be more than glad to help you.

These are very basic questions that have been answers everywhere on this site ;)
 

Leviticus

Arachnobaron
Old Timer
Joined
Oct 10, 2006
Messages
357
Please use the search function. If after you do some research you have any questions, I will be more than glad to help you.

These are very basic questions that have been answers everywhere on this site ;)
+1 for what Fran said, just lookup pinktoe care. Also they don't like being "petted"
 

8by8

Arachnoknight
Old Timer
Joined
Mar 17, 2009
Messages
234
Most deaths in captive exotics is from improper husbandry. Research first then buy.
 

Hobo

( ͡° ͜ʖ ͡°)
Staff member
Joined
Jul 27, 2009
Messages
2,206
{D I just got a pink-toe tarantula and I have lots of questions.
1. How deep should the terrain be?
2. Humidity and temperature?
3. I put a piece of driftwood I got shaped like a V, to climb on; is that enough?
4. Can I put a plant in so I can spray that for right humidity?
5. Rosebud (the ends of her feet look like that to me) ate a half dozen small crickets that were placed in her home (5-1/2 gallon tank) and they are completely gone. Don't they leave cricket parts or was she starving?
6. How often and how much should I feed her?
7. When I had anoles I kept crickets in a container with food, being told if crickets had nutrients in them, the anoles would get "healthier" food. I then placed some crickets in a baggie with white vitamin powder, shook them up (I called it shake and bake), and the crickets were easily seen on the brown terrain. Can I do that with Rosebud?
8. So you don't think I know nothing, I have a good adviser but I wanted to ask these questions and get your answers. She is happy on top of the driftwood, head down. She can't see anybody so maybe she thinks she is hiding. :D
9. There is a heater underneath the tank, a shallow water dish, the climbing branches, and a plant if I can do that. Am I set to go?
10. Last question for now. She's got fangs! I plan on slowly placing my arm in her home like a stick until she feels comfortable to climb my arm. My goal is to eventually be able to occasionally take her out and in the middle of my bed let her climb my arm and be petted. Will she tolerate this? Thanks everyone. {D
1. Substrate is of no concern with this arboreal species, and is just there mainly for aesthetics, and perhaps to bump humidity. use your own discretion.

2. Temperature should be in the 70s (room temps are fine), humidity never less than the low 60s, I'd say. Don't stress too much on these figures. It should be ok as long as it's not extreme. You can accomplish this by providing a water dish, restricting some ventilation, and heating the room or tank if need be (most likely won't need to heat it).

3. Yes that would be fine, I have my avic that way now, though I've arranged the "v" to allow some cover behind. Note that if you moisten the sub, most driftwood will mold at the base where it touches the ground. If you can find corkbark, use that instead, as it is more mold resistant.

4. Yes you can, though since this is your first T, I'd suggest getting their basic care down first, before dabbling into plants. To keep humidity, just provide a large water dish, and restrict some ventilation. That's all.

5. They typically catch all they can hold, and leave a round "spitball" of the undigested parts called a bolus. You should find and remove these, as they can attract pests.

6. A food item a week is sufficient. Yes, that's one cricket per week.

7. They don't need it, and as mentioned earlier, may prove harmful in the long run.

8. If your advisor is from a pet store, I'd be wary of her advice. Judging from your very basic questions, I'll assume your advisor doesn't know as much as you do right now!

9. You probably won't need the heater, though if you do need it, under the tank WOULD INDEED be the best place for it for this particular species, IMO, since they rarely touch the ground. To be safe, you are better off keeping the room warm instead! Also, be aware that since they are arboreal, they should be housed with as much height as possible. Most folks turn their tanks on their end to accomplish this.

10. It ain't a bird, so I think your efforts of keeping your hand in it's cage for her to get used to you will be wasted. Instead, try to shoo her into a plastic cup, to remove her from her enclosure and attempt handling. Absolutely no petting, or cuddling. They're not that kind of pet!

My advice:

From your questions, it's pretty evident you still need to do a lot of research. Search the boards, read the stickies on how to search the boards if need be (it can be a bit complicated) but try to gather as much info as you can. Hopefully you won't find yourself in bed smashing snowglobes, swing "rosebud...."

Hope this helps!
 

Mark weller

Arachnopeon
Joined
Dec 12, 2016
Messages
6
yikes where to begin, most of your questions can be answered with care sheets on the avics so i'll only focus on the emergent questions. should you calcium powder the crickets? heck no those vitamins while good for herps are extremely bad for inverts. As far as your under tank heater goes thats a huge no no unless you want fried tarantula. Handling might be an issue (this is a highly debated topic personally i occasionally handle mine) if this is your first T your pink toe might be intimidating because avics are crazy fast and will run quickly there are handling tips on this board though as well
 

Mark weller

Arachnopeon
Joined
Dec 12, 2016
Messages
6
Yeah I have to agree, under floor heating is a big no no, I have just rehoused my pink toe. And yes you can put plants in with them. I spray the pots every few days and this keeps humidity up. Also keep on dry substrate and just mist the enclosure every few days. As for handling, they can be quite skittish and will run, and jump so be careful as they are really fragile.
 

Ghost56

Arachnobaron
Joined
Aug 28, 2016
Messages
443
Yeah I have to agree, under floor heating is a big no no, I have just rehoused my pink toe. And yes you can put plants in with them. I spray the pots every few days and this keeps humidity up. Also keep on dry substrate and just mist the enclosure every few days. As for handling, they can be quite skittish and will run, and jump so be careful as they are really fragile.
This threads almost 6 years old
 

Andrea82

Arachnoemperor
Joined
Jan 12, 2016
Messages
3,612
Yeah I have to agree, under floor heating is a big no no, I have just rehoused my pink toe. And yes you can put plants in with them. I spray the pots every few days and this keeps humidity up. Also keep on dry substrate and just mist the enclosure every few days. As for handling, they can be quite skittish and will run, and jump so be careful as they are really fragile.
I'm pretty sure the OP won't read your comment anymore ;).
New members have all threads marked as unread, and often don't notice the date of the post . Eaiest way to fix this is to hit 'mark all forums as read', and from then on you only get the trending topics ;)
 
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