I Found 4 Green Anoles.

coldbl00ded

Arachnopeon
Joined
Jan 18, 2022
Messages
45
They are pretty good sized, around 5-6 in each. The biggest one is molting, should I help it?
 

Frogdaddy

Arachnoangel
Active Member
Joined
Nov 13, 2019
Messages
858
Green anoles are going extinct in Florida. Consider yourself lucky.
Yes Green anoles are being out completed by the Bahamian brown anole and Cuban Knight Anole and the native green tree frog is being out competed by the Cuban brown tree frog. Sad.
 

darkness975

Latrodectus
Arachnosupporter +
Joined
Aug 31, 2012
Messages
4,758
Green anoles are going extinct in Florida. Consider yourself lucky.
Yes Green anoles are being out completed by the Bahamian brown anole and Cuban Knight Anole and the native green tree frog is being out competed by the Cuban brown tree frog. Sad.
Is there any chance to reverse that damage? Captive breeding , invasive species culling, etc? Is the issue country wide or only in Florida?

Latrodectus geometricus is out competing the native Latrodectus hesperus in certain areas of California but so far there aren't many that are overly concerned since L. hesperus has such a wide range.

My personal opinion though? I'm concerned.
 

A cave cricket

Arachnoknight
Active Member
Joined
Mar 17, 2022
Messages
181
Mostly in the southern states, it's a big issue, and it's pretty hard to breed them in captivity.
 

jc55

Arachnoknight
Active Member
Joined
Apr 3, 2014
Messages
208
Green anoles are going extinct in Florida. Consider yourself lucky.
They were getting hard to find when i first came to Florida in the late 90's and i think i saw one the last year i was there two years ago.
 

Frogdaddy

Arachnoangel
Active Member
Joined
Nov 13, 2019
Messages
858
Is there any chance to reverse that damage? Captive breeding , invasive species culling, etc? Is the issue country wide or only in Florida?

Latrodectus geometricus is out competing the native Latrodectus hesperus in certain areas of California but so far there aren't many that are overly concerned since L. hesperus has such a wide range.

My personal opinion though? I'm concerned.
Invasive culling might help. The problem with both the anoles and tree frogs is they occupy the same niche and look similar to the endemic species.
Fortunately this particular problem is only in Florida, and really only the Southern half of the state. The Cuban tree frogs and Bahamian anoles can't survive the climate of Northern Florida.
 

darkness975

Latrodectus
Arachnosupporter +
Joined
Aug 31, 2012
Messages
4,758
Invasive culling might help. The problem with both the anoles and tree frogs is they occupy the same niche and look similar to the endemic species.
Fortunately this particular problem is only in Florida, and really only the Southern half of the state. The Cuban tree frogs and Bahamian anoles can't survive the climate of Northern Florida.
That is mildly positive news.
 

Salmonsaladsandwich

Arachnobaron
Active Member
Joined
Jul 28, 2016
Messages
570
Green anoles aren't exactly going extinct in florida. It's true that their populations have been negatively impacted by browns but they're quite capable of coexisting and maintaining sustainable populations. It seems like green anoles are rare, but its partly because brown anoles are better adapted for living near the ground, in open spaces and around buildings so they're much more visible while greens have been pushed to living higher in tree canopies and in dense vegetation where they're harder to see. Since the introduction of brown anoles, greens have actually evolved larger toe pads to adapt to a more fully arboreal lifestyle as browns dominate them on the ground but not so much high in trees. If you leave urban areas and go to a park with lots of natural vegetation the brown anole population is less dense and you'll see more greens as well.

It's a somewhat similar story with cuban and green treefrogs- cubans do severely compete with and prey on greens, but the apparent rarity of greens is partly because they're less conspicuous and hide in trees and thick vegetation while cubans are conspicuous around buildings. I've seen a large, healthy population of green treefrogs breeding in ponds in an suburban area that also has many cuban treefrogs.

The invasive species have definitely had negative impacts on their native counterparts and reduced their populations, but in these particular examples its not really accurate to say that they're driving them extinct when they've been coexisting for decades.
 

Pmurinushmacla

Arachnobaron
Active Member
Joined
Nov 26, 2020
Messages
351
They were getting hard to find when i first came to Florida in the late 90's and i think i saw one the last year i was there two years ago.
Central fl here, I still see them but its one every couple months. Granted Im not looking for them.
 
Top