I am Rehabilitating a Bat- Open Discussion

wickee

Arachnopeon
Joined
Apr 14, 2021
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10
Visual acuity varies from species to species. Some are able to detect colors and light intensity, some can see in the UV spectrum and they use vision while mating. But in overall eye function their eyesight is significantly less than a human's.
As for being "in all intents and purposes blind" referring to the bats I was watching at night. Do your own test. Le Mans speedway. You are in a Formula 1 up around 100 mph snaking through the turns and curves, the track is unlit and the car has no lights.
Nifty web site about bats: https://www.doi.gov/blog/13-facts-about-bats
not trying to argue the point but there is no "overall". Observational data is not scientific and is considered anecdotal and not really relevant. Trying to determine the acuity of any animals vision or reliance by observation would call for the operation of that animals brain. Owls can fly around the speedway with absolutely no light and it would be primarily from their vision so the lack of light is irrelevant in how the rods/cones and physiology of the eye integrates into the animals brain. I understand that there are many variations of vision in bats but there is no science to support the "overall" statement. In some cases that may be true and in some cases it may not.

Every "scientific" publication that says they are blind or lack good visual acuity can be matched by one that says they aren't. I was simply trying to point out that Bats are not blind at all and may CAN see as well or better than humans. There are probably many that can't as well just like with birds. It's those coin phrases that further misinformation that I get concerned about because the goal should always be to educate and education should always defer to science first and anecdotal experiences last.

I'm a big fan of bats and they are an animal with a great deal of misinformation around them especially the issues surrounding their sight.
 

The Snark

Dumpster Fire of the Gods
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Aug 8, 2005
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9,390
@wickee You failed to understand my point. Even with visual acuity of an eagle, under near or complete darkness, at those speeds and chasing highly maneuverable flying prey, vision is of little use to any animal. In all intents and purposes, blind as far as catching bugs goes. As an added bonus, echo location offers a capabilities vision doesn't have; the doppler effect coupled to a sophisticated neural network in the bats brain - essentially a powerful computer, that tells the animal the precise speed and trajectory of it's prey., plus the vertical, longitudinal and lateral axes as the prey alters directions. Far more accurate and informative than eyesight which only relates if an object is approaching or receding, and stereoscopic vision giving an approximation of the speed.
 

Craig73

Arachnodemon
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Jun 2, 2016
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768
If I missed it, apologies…do you rehabilitate them in something like a parrot cage? Is it challenging to get them back into their temp home after being flight tested/excersied? And lastly, do they get reintroduced at a particular place or does it matter?

I‘ve never seen one in real life or read up on them, so the primary thing I remember from childhood is they are small and can carry rabies.

My mind keeps thinking it’s hanging upside down in the closet between the dress shirts and casual wear.
 

Royalty

Arachnoknight
Joined
Mar 11, 2020
Messages
237
If I missed it, apologies…do you rehabilitate them in something like a parrot cage? Is it challenging to get them back into their temp home after being flight tested/excersied? And lastly, do they get reintroduced at a particular place or does it matter?

I‘ve never seen one in real life or read up on them, so the primary thing I remember from childhood is they are small and can carry rabies.

My mind keeps thinking it’s hanging upside down in the closet between the dress shirts and casual wear.
A cage would not be a good idea. They can fit through very small cracks (the ones I have)

They do not forget how to fly and reintegrate themselves well. There is a colony in my building.

They do have specific care for rehab small pup tents and fleece is good. I am using a glass terrarium but it is altered. Rubbing against glass sides is not good for them.
They can carry rabies. Where I live it is very uncommon and I have not heard of any reports about it here specifically.
 

Royalty

Arachnoknight
Joined
Mar 11, 2020
Messages
237
to science first and anecdotal experiences last.

I'm a big fan of bats and they are an animal with a great deal of misinformation around them especially the issues surrounding their sight.
They definitely can see. The ones I have dealt with have watched my hands and follow it around and look up at my face.
 

jc55

Arachnosquire
Active Member
Joined
Apr 3, 2014
Messages
136
Aw, lil sky puppies are the best. You're a good bean, caring for them. Do you collect samples for researchers studying and tracking white nose syndrome?
I believe that white nose syndrome is what took out the bats in New York state by the foothills of the Adirondack mountains.
 

JasperTheSpooder

Arachnopeon
Active Member
Joined
Jan 12, 2022
Messages
30
Let me just say, I'm so unhappy that because of COVID, they're getting such a bad reputation, as these horrific carriers of viruses and dirty animals in general. Thank you for caring about them so much!
 

mickiem

Arachnoprince
Active Member
Joined
Jul 23, 2016
Messages
1,603
In the US you have to have a permit to rehab or keep bats. I went through all the classes then decided I just didn't have time to make it happen. Sad - I love to watch them.
 

mickiem

Arachnoprince
Active Member
Joined
Jul 23, 2016
Messages
1,603
In the US you have to have a permit to rehab or keep bats. I went through all the classes then decided I just didn't have time to make it happen. Sad - I love to watch them.
 
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