Humor me...Most dangerous T?

Scorpionking20

Arachnoknight
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May 31, 2010
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Yes, we all know Ts are individuals and there are OBTs that think they are G pulchipes and G pulchripes that think they are OBTs.

My question is this...between willingness to bite, venom potency and volume, speed, "jumping" ability, fang size, and defensiveness/aggressiveness (Again...this is not a thread to discuss semantics) what would you classify as "The Most Dangerous Tarantula"?
 

RoseT

Arachnosquire
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Sep 20, 2010
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I would assume the spider nick named " Orange Bitey Thing" would be a good candidate, at least on my list its number 1.
 

KvMccur

Arachnopeon
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Dec 4, 2010
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The most dangerous tarantula has not been found yet, but forget about speed an jumping, it is all about the venom. Following that standard, the Brazillian Wondering Spider and the Australian Funnel Web should be taken into account. Aggressiveness aside, the Black Widow, Hobo, African 6 eyed Crab Spider and brown recluse are painfull, to most, deadly to some, and are not considered aggresive. In tarantulas, it is currently the Indian, Australian and Asian species, which have potent venom and are aggressive. Do not touch your asian teritorials or Indian/Asian tree climbers.
 

Scorpionking20

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The most dangerous tarantula has not been found yet, but forget about speed an jumping, it is all about the venom. Following that standard, the Brazillian Wondering Spider and the Australian Funnel Web should be taken into account. Aggressiveness aside, the Black Widow, Hobo, African 6 eyed Crab Spider and brown recluse are painfull, to most, deadly to some, and are not considered aggresive. In tarantulas, it is currently the Indian, Australian and Asian species, which have potent venom and are aggressive. Do not touch your asian teritorials or Indian/Asian tree climbers.
You may have misunderstood...I was only talking Tarantulas, rather than spiders in general. Also, I would consider speed pretty important to a "most dangerous" list. A slower moving T with higher venom potency wouldn't have the same chance to bite you as a faster T with the same venom potency; hence, it would be more dangerous. I was also inquiring about which species could pose the most threat to a human...The gist of your' argument was "old world Ts are more aggressive and have more potent venom." I think a lot of people already know that.

However, if your' opinion is that speed has nothing to do with it, then ok! I did ask for everybody's opinions. ;)
 

dannyboypede

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Aug 22, 2010
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I would consider pokies to be the most dangerous...which is why I shy away from them. Rob's "Clover," a 10" P. ornata, is a spider I would not want to get bitten by. The fang spread has got to be an inch, the fangs have got to be close to an inch, pokies basically teleport, and the venom sent even Rob to the hospital. I have also heard stories of pokies showing genuine aggression, and leaving their enclosures to come for their owners. I don't know if these stories are true, but they get big and mean with very potent venom.

In response to the speed relevance argument, we aren't talking about the deadliest spider, but the most dangerous T. If there was a T that had venom that could put you in a coma, yet never bit and moved slower than an earthworm, I would not consider it dangerous. A T with that same venom that can move faster than the human eye can register, would be dangerous.

--Dan
 

AgentD006las

Arach-how about..NO
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I would consider pokies to be the most dangerous...which is why I shy away from them. Rob's "Clover," a 10" P. ornata, is a spider I would not want to get bitten by. The fang spread has got to be an inch, the fangs have got to be close to an inch, pokies basically teleport, and the venom sent even Rob to the hospital. I have also heard stories of pokies showing genuine aggression, and leaving their enclosures to come for their owners. I don't know if these stories are true, but they get big and mean with very potent venom.

In response to the speed relevance argument, we aren't talking about the deadliest spider, but the most dangerous T. If there was a T that had venom that could put you in a coma, yet never bit and moved slower than an earthworm, I would not consider it dangerous. A T with that same venom that can move faster than the human eye can register, would be dangerous.

--Dan
When rob got bit he had his hand between a male and female mating. He said she was going for the male. The rest of what you heard about them coming out of there enclosures to come for there owners is hear say.
 

Kris-wIth-a-K

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I'd pin an S. Calceatum against an OBT any day.. When I think of dangerous it'scertainly not so much size as it is speed and venom potency..

+1 for S. Calceatum IMO
 

KvMccur

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Correct, speed has absolutley nothing to do with it. You will never be faster than a determined spider, so simply focus on venom. The slowest such animals are the most dangerous, that is why they can be slow. A fast spider with minimal venom can not be compared to a slow spider with significant venom.
 

Kris-wIth-a-K

Arachnoprince
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Correct, speed has absolutley nothing to do with it. You will never be faster than a determined spider, so simply focus on venom. The slowest such animals are the most dangerous, that is why they can be slow. A fast spider with minimal venom can not be compared to a slow spider with significant venom.

The human relfex is pretty quick and has saved me and am sure a few others from a bite or 2.
 

dannyboypede

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Aug 22, 2010
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When rob got bit he had his hand between a male and female mating. He said she was going for the male. The rest of what you heard about them coming out of there enclosures to come for there owners is hear say.
I didn't mean that that is what happened to rob, I just meant in general. I personally don't believe those stories because I don't believe tarantulas are aggressive. I was just acknowledging the fact that these stories exist.

Again, if a T is slow yet has potent venom, I wouldn't worry as much about it as a T that is fast and has potent venom. I can get away from a slow T, but a pokie, not likely. What makes a T dangerous is the potency of it's venom and it's willingness to bite. A slow docile T with potent venom is potentially dangerous.
Just my .02,
Dan
 

dianedfisher

Arachnobaron
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Harpactira lightfooti is supposed to have "medically" significant venom and is a fairly defensive/aggressive African tarantula. I'm extra careful with any of my African tarantulas and have a healthy respect for them. I own many of the African and Asian species available to the U.S. market and in the past 4 years the only 2 tarantulas who have ever expressed aggression to me are: Pterinochilus murinus and Selenocosmia dichromata. Both of these will not hesitate to strike at me without provocation during feeding. Diane
 

JimM

Arachnoangel
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The most dangerous thing is a complacent human. THAT is the cause of just about every single tarantula bit that occurs.
 

Poxicator

Arachnobaron
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s. calceatum
There's your answer.

Probably the most potent venom, definitely very fast and in the wild is known to hunt you down on disturbance.

There hasnt, to the best of my knowledge, been an extensive comparison of tarantula venom. There has been studies of individuals and the compounds within the venom. Most studies are based on the beneficial affects of the venom which includes Psalmopeous, currently being explored as aid for erectile dysfunction.
 

AgentD006las

Arach-how about..NO
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Correct, speed has absolutley nothing to do with it. You will never be faster than a determined spider, so simply focus on venom. The slowest such animals are the most dangerous, that is why they can be slow. A fast spider with minimal venom can not be compared to a slow spider with significant venom.
I dont know of any slow moving Ts that have potent venom.
You may want to base what you say on facts.
"The slowest such animals are the most dangerous, that is why they can be slow." This doesnt apply to tarantulas. The few tarantulas that could be considered dangerous at all are very defensive and have potent venom.

"Correct, speed has absolutley nothing to do with it."
It has alot to do with it. The split second it takes to move your hand away if your dumb enough to put your hand in a enclosure to suprise your T.

I chose S. caceatum because its venom is known to be the most toxic to people. There venom can cause a cardiac arrhythmia. They are one of the medicaly significant tarantula bites. They are also very defensive and fast!

Read post 9

http://www.reptileforums.co.uk/forums/dwa-species/499254-tarantula-venom.html
 

dannyboypede

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Aug 22, 2010
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142
I dont know of any slow moving Ts that have potent venom.
You may want to base what you say on facts.
"The slowest such animals are the most dangerous, that is why they can be slow." This doesnt apply to tarantulas. The few tarantulas that could be considered dangerous at all are very defensive and have potent venom.

"Correct, speed has absolutley nothing to do with it."
It has alot to do with it. The split second it takes to move your hand away if your dumb enough to put your hand in a enclosure to suprise your T.

I chose S. caceatum because its venom is known to be the most toxic to people. There venom can cause a cardiac arrhythmia. They are one of the medicaly significant tarantula bites. They are also very defensive and fast!

Read post 9

http://www.reptileforums.co.uk/forums/dwa-species/499254-tarantula-venom.html
+1 because my message is not too short
--Dan
 

killy

Arachnoknight
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May 20, 2009
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I have also heard stories of pokies showing genuine aggression, and leaving their enclosures to come for their owners. I don't know if these stories are true, but they get big and mean with very potent venom.--Dan
If these are the criteria, then my B vagans, who apparently was orphaned at a young age and raised by a pokie, is the most dangerous T in my household.

Fortunately I cannot comment on the potency of his venom ... yet.
 

Scorpionking20

Arachnoknight
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May 31, 2010
Messages
158
Seems there is a consensous for S cal being the "Most Dangerous Tarantula" to keep as a pet. Thanks for posting that link. I'd read that story before, but it's such an interesting read. Seems they are...how should I phrase it to not hurt people's feelings...actively defensive.

I have yet to get an H mac or S cal. I do own 3 pokies, and REALLY enjoy them. They don't seem to be OBT like with threats, but they seem to stand their ground if they don't run away at first.
 

BigJ999

Arachnoknight
Joined
Sep 1, 2010
Messages
188
Phlogius crassipes although i rarely hear of bites from this species of T. I have read about that their venom is potent enough to kill a dog or cat within 20 or 30 minutes. And make a person voimit for a couple of hour's at least
 
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