How to prounounce "Theridiidae"?

l.MetalHead.l

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I tried the search function and i found very useful links involving the pronunciation of latin and common species. But none of the links said how to pronounce the "ii" or Theridiidae. If anyone could explain how to pronounce this, I would be a happy panda. Thanks.
 

Arakatac

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Theridiidae

t and h are pronounced separately

i is as in "bit" - the two "i"s get pronounced separately - think of the word "signify" without the "gn" and you get "SI-ify" - accent on the first IH sound

ae is pronounced almost as two separate sounds (ah-ay) but in regular use they get shortened to sound sort of like a long "I" as in "die"

so what you end up with is t-hair-id-IH-ih-die

(lots of "ih"s in this word, aye? ;)
 

KUJordan

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t and h are pronounced separately
-Huh? No the 'T' and the 'h' are NOT pronounced separately. That's wack.

Thare-ih-DEE-ih-DAY.

-or-

Thare-ih-DEE-ih-dee.

the "dae" at the end is debatable...
 

jsloan

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"Spiders of North America" has it as ther-i-DEE-i-dee.
 
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asher

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'-ae' is pronounced '-eye' in Latin and '-i' is pronounced '-ee', so it should be The-ri-DEE-i-die.
 

Terry D

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t and h are pronounced separately

i is as in "bit" - the two "i"s get pronounced separately - think of the word "signify" without the "gn" and you get "SI-ify" - accent on the first IH sound

ae is pronounced almost as two separate sounds (ah-ay) but in regular use they get shortened to sound sort of like a long "I" as in "die"

so what you end up with is t-hair-id-IH-ih-die

(lots of "ih"s in this word, aye? ;)
Whaaat!? So how many tee hairopee hosids are tee hurivin' in your collect? {D
 

spydrhunter1

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-Huh? No the 'T' and the 'h' are NOT pronounced separately. That's wack.

Thare-ih-DEE-ih-DAY.

-or-

Thare-ih-DEE-ih-dee.

the "dae" at the end is debatable...
Jordan has the right pronunciation.....
 

Arakatac

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Well, thank you, all of you Latin scholars!

To the OP, I apologize - I assumed when you asked how to pronounce Theridiidae, you meant that you wanted to know how to pronounce it correctly. Please forgive me.

To the rest of you distinguished linguists, let me give you a little lesson: in Latin "th" is always - always - pronounced like the 'th' in 'thyme,' or 'thomas' - or, more correctly, like the "th" in "hothouse.

And so it is with "ch" and "ph" -
Chromatopelma cyaneopubescens - the ch is pronounced like kh
Aphonopelma eutylenum - the ph is pronounced like p (or p'h)
and
Theridiidae - the th is pronounced like t (or t'h)

Vedi, veni, vinci.
 

Aurelia

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Well, thank you, all of you Latin scholars!

To the OP, I apologize - I assumed when you asked how to pronounce Theridiidae, you meant that you wanted to know how to pronounce it correctly. Please forgive me.

To the rest of you distinguished linguists, let me give you a little lesson: in Latin "th" is always - always - pronounced like the 'th' in 'thyme,' or 'thomas' - or, more correctly, like the "th" in "hothouse.

And so it is with "ch" and "ph" -
Chromatopelma cyaneopubescens - the ch is pronounced like kh
Aphonopelma eutylenum - the ph is pronounced like p (or p'h)
and
Theridiidae - the th is pronounced like t (or t'h)

Vedi, veni, vinci.
Weird, in 4 years of high school Latin, I never learned that, and my Magister was a brilliant linguist and polyglot...
 

The Snark

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When in doubt, check your etymology.
Dictionary pronunsifications:
Theridiid: thuh-rid-ee-id
Theridiidae: ther-ə-ˈdī-ə-ˌdē

Theridiid as personal possessive is sometimes pronounced thuh rid ie-id.

The confusion comes from... this is of Greek origin with Latin suffix
Greek -thērídion, dimunitive of thēríon beast + New Latin -idae -id
Come on folks! Remember your Greek tales of the great beast?
 
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billopelma

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Well, thank you, all of you Latin scholars!
One thing some people just don't seem to get is that these are scientific names, not Latin names. Obviously there is a relationship there, but not all the sames 'rules'...

Bill
 

The Snark

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One thing some people just don't seem to get is that these are scientific names, not Latin names. Obviously there is a relationship there, but not all the sames 'rules'...

Bill
Very true. Even in the highest scientific circles, the great polyglot shall tosseth the occasional ringer.
:eek:(I kind of like grafting a Latin (scientific) tail on a mythological monster.) :eek:
 
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cacoseraph

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scientific names are worse than any single language... cuz pronunciation goes with the languages of origin, even with species names made from personal names. it's almost pure memorization



functionally though, almost everyone i have met in real life just sort of muddles through. we spell things sometimes, even =P

the biggest trip i have noticed? it seems like ppl in the USA that live far enough away from me to have accents sorta trend towards having different common pronunciations for some words. i haven't talked to near enough foreigners to know for sure, but it does kinda seem that way. would be fun to research if anyone was a linguist or whatever
 

Bill S

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One thing some people just don't seem to get is that these are scientific names, not Latin names. Obviously there is a relationship there, but not all the sames 'rules'...

Bill
The Latin portions of the scientific names do follow Latin rules. The exceptions to those rules occur when non-Latin names (smithi, Kukulcania) are introduced, and even those are to some extent governed by Latin rules.

The whole point of using Latin as the primary basis of scientific names was so that there would be a single international standard that all scientists could pronounce correctly. Obviously, this has not been 100% successful. I guess that's to be expected in a world where multilingualism is an anomaly and even literacy is fading. People just find excuses to not know or use the standard rules.
 

The Snark

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appellation
late 15c., "action of appealing" (to a higher authority), from O.Fr. appellation (13c.), from L. appellationem (nom. appellatio), noun of action from appellare (see appeal). Meaning "designation, name given to a person, thing, or class" is from mid-15c., from a sense also found in M.Fr. appeler

We need to keep in mind however, that a PhD has license to create her/his own name. This naming is supposed to follow certain conventions, but as the PhD is the authority, isn't always obliged to.


"How absolute the knave is! We must speak by the card else equivocation will undo us!" Hamlet
 

Bill S

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We need to keep in mind however, that a PhD has license to create her/his own name. This naming is supposed to follow certain conventions, but as the PhD is the authority, isn't always obliged to.
Not completely sure I'm following you here. Did you mean the person describing the species? If so, there's no requirement at all for that person to be a PhD. However, whether PhD or otherwise, there are conventions that must be followed. The person writing the description does have an obligation to follow them - no individual has the authority to disregard the naming conventions. The choice of names, though, is largely up to the person doing the description and does not have to be drawn from Latin sources. It is common for geographical place names to be used, and species can be named after people - and these names are rarely in Latin. Some taxonomists have found inspiration in other sources as well, such as from mythologies of different cultures. However, these non-Latin names must be integrated into the system using standards of Latin grammar.
 

The Snark

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Not completely sure I'm following you here. Did you mean the person describing the species? If so, there's no requirement at all for that person to be a PhD. However, whether PhD or otherwise, there are conventions that must be followed. The person writing the description does have an obligation to follow them - no individual has the authority to disregard the naming conventions. The choice of names, though, is largely up to the person doing the description and does not have to be drawn from Latin sources. It is common for geographical place names to be used, and species can be named after people - and these names are rarely in Latin. Some taxonomists have found inspiration in other sources as well, such as from mythologies of different cultures. However, these non-Latin names must be integrated into the system using standards of Latin grammar.
Exactly. Theridiidae, a pseudo-scientific polyglot. Definitions are much more rigidly controlled. The PhD simply has the added authority to add to or modify a convention, provided it fits within the greater framework.
As in that noble stellar body, 3834 Zappafrank, following a defined convention. Call it what you will, the discoverer cannot rewrite the laws of astrophysics in describing it's properties.
 
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Michiel

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I tried the search function and i found very useful links involving the pronunciation of latin and common species. But none of the links said how to pronounce the "ii" or Theridiidae. If anyone could explain how to pronounce this, I would be a happy panda. Thanks.

The-rye-di-die
 
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