How often shall i feed my GBB?

Chad Peace

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Ordered a 2.5 inch, female chromatopelma cyaneopubescens for £26 and it will be here tomorrow or the day after, how often shall i feed her? im planning on using mealworms because i dont like the smell of black crickets, This will be my first T.
 
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TownesVanZandt

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They eat for fun! I´m feeding mine several crickets every two weeks, but you can feed one prey item weekly or whatever schedule that works for you. I wouldn´t just feed them mealworms (they´re quite fatty). Crickets or Dubia is a better staple diet, but don´t be afraid to feed worms from time to time.
 

Chad Peace

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They eat for fun! I´m feeding mine several crickets every two weeks, but you can feed one prey item weekly or whatever schedule that works for you. I wouldn´t just feed them mealworms (they´re quite fatty). Crickets or Dubia is a better staple diet, but don´t be afraid to feed worms from time to time.
Ahh okay, i guess i am going to have to get used to that cricket smell
 

TownesVanZandt

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Ahh okay, i guess i am going to have to get used to that cricket smell
If you have a pet store close by, they will probably sell them. I just go every second week to buy the crickets I need. You might also order them online from breeders, but that would probably be a bit expensive only for one T.
 

Nephrite

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One cricket, or mealworms occasionally. Crickets are a good staple diet, mealworms are more of a chocolate to them and just a fatty snack. If you decide to feed mealworms I would just crush the head to prevent them from digging down into the substrate.(That is if he doesn't take the food as soon as it's dropped.) Feedings once a week should suffice since he's pretty much out of the fragile sling stage, and as your first tarantula you want to enjoy for a long while. If he refuses, he's probably in premolt. Also, for the first week, after you've rehoused him, don't be suprised for him refusing food as he's still getting used to his environment.(They're quite good eaters, so this is less common with them.) Welcome to the hobby bud!
 

bryverine

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I usually go once a week or so. My girl has always had a colossal appetite. It's very easy to tell if she's in premolt because of this. :D

I'm not questioning your research here, but would you mind posting a picture of your setup? People generally get pretty poor advise and misinformation for their first tarantula.

If you haven't heard:
  • No heat mats/lamps
  • No misting
  • No cricket gel
  • Use a big water dish with fresh water
Welcome, get ready to start picking out your second (tenth) tarantula soon! ;)
 

Trenor

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I wouldn´t just feed them mealworms (they´re quite fatty).
I am wondering if this is a problem for Ts or if it is a carry over from reptiles like some other beliefs. It seems to me the amount they are fed rather then the fat percentage results in the T having more weight. All my Ts, even the smallest ones, get Dubia roaches. They are just as plump as some (I've seen on here) that were mainly feed meal/super worms. I do tend to feed my slings a lot more then some people on here and they are pretty plump. A few of my jusvies are kinda plump as well. I do feed them slower but larger prey.

I'd be interested in any research you guys may know of on how fatty insects affect T weight. Do they even store weight like reptiles or mammals?
 

Vanessa

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Because GBB's are more skittish, and faster, than a lot of other tarantulas considered good choices for beginners - I would never feed them something that requires you to get your tongs close to them or have the lid off longer than necessary.
I get the cricket in there as quickly as possible and close the lid. My two are fabulous eaters and will come towards the opening as opposed to away from it like almost everyone else. They are always hungry and very enthusiastic about it. And did I mention that they are fast?
Please have a catch cup ready at all times. Please have all drains plugged as well. Take every precaution with this species because they are very fast and skittish. I have never seen any defensive behaviour from mine, though. They are not usually defensive.
 

EulersK

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I have never seen any defensive behaviour from mine, though. They are not usually defensive.
I couldn't agree more with them being fast and always hungry. The only time that I know mine is in premolt is when she's not eating. As for defense, though, mine readily kicks hair. The setae are harmless, they don't affect me even a little, but still. She's trying :p
 

bryverine

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I am wondering if this is a problem for Ts or if it is a carry over from reptiles like some other beliefs. It seems to me the amount they are fed rather then the fat percentage results in the T having more weight.
I think that someone should measure the protein and fats in the different feeders.
After that, tarantula poo can be analyzed for residuals. That would be super interesting. :astonished:

All my Ts, even the smallest ones, get Dubia roaches. They are just as plump as some (I've seen on here) that were mainly feed meal/super worms. I do tend to feed my slings a lot more then some people on here and they are pretty plump. A few of my jusvies are kinda plump as well. I do feed them slower but larger prey.
Certainly some of the fattest Ts I've seen. ;)

I'd be interested in any research you guys may know of on how fatty insects affect T weight. Do they even store weight like reptiles or mammals?
They remind be of camels. :embarrassed:
 

mistertim

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I couldn't agree more with them being fast and always hungry. The only time that I know mine is in premolt is when she's not eating. As for defense, though, mine readily kicks hair. The setae are harmless, they don't affect me even a little, but still. She's trying :p
Yeah my GBB kicks hairs like its going out of style. But yeah, they are super fast when they want to be...gotta be prepared for it just in case. Their feeding response is pretty amazing. Mine has literally caught crickets I dropped in before they landed.
 

Ceymann

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I think that someone should measure the protein and fats in the different feeders.
After that, tarantula poo can be analyzed for residuals. That would be super interesting. :astonished:
There would be a heck of a lot of variables that would need to eliminated from said experience, some of which may not even be possible to eliminate. Would be interesting though, measuring what goes in/out, what macro and micro nutrients are utilized most by the T's. Certainly would give us a much better understanding of T nutrition. would certainly give us a much better idea on what foods we should be using to gut load prey items.
I could really see this type of info being helpful to breeders by enabling them to provide top tier nutrition for females, possible resulting in more successful sacs and better yields.
 

Trenor

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I think that someone should measure the protein and fats in the different feeders.
After that, tarantula poo can be analyzed for residuals. That would be super interesting. :astonished:
There would be a lot of other factors in place trying to go that route.

I think it would be easier to get two groups of tarantulas from the same sack and feed one the fatty worms by weight and the second group the same weight of roaches/crickets. You'd have to take into account exoskeleton because some prey have more then others. Keeping track of how they eat and with refusals etc. Then see if the ones fed the fatty worms resulted in fatter/more unhealthy Ts or reduced growth rates etc.

Certainly some of the fattest Ts I've seen. ;)
It is hard not to give them food too when I'm feeding my slings. Even if it's just a small roach like I'm giving the slings. :p

With my adults, I have been a lot better about heavy feeding. A few fat juvies are getting reduced food for a while to try and size them down some. The slings though get all they want/will eat. Keep in mind I am using a good micro lens that gets a lot closer so their plumpness shows up a lot more prominent. At least that is what I choose to believe. :D

There would be a heck of a lot of variables that would need to eliminated from said experience, some of which may not even be possible to eliminate. Would be interesting though, measuring what goes in/out, what macro and micro nutrients are utilized most by the T's. Certainly would give us a much better understanding of T nutrition. would certainly give us a much better idea on what foods we should be using to gut load prey items.
I could really see this type of info being helpful to breeders by enabling them to provide top tier nutrition for females, possible resulting in more successful sacs and better yields.
Like you stated, these types of studies are hard because they have a lot of variables and outside influences that can effect the results. It would be as hard to track down for Ts as it has been for humans and there are a lot more studies for humans then there ever will be for Ts.
 

Vanessa

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Tarantulas don't suffer the same conditions as mammals when it comes to high protein, high fat, diets. They don't process or store those nutrient by-products the same way as warm blooded organisms do.
If you have a tarantula with a large abdomen - they will be prone to more injuries than their slimmer counterparts. They have a higher chance of abdomen rupture or rubbing type injuries. Those are all external factors, though. As far as internally 'unhealthy' tarantulas, in the same way that mammals are 'unhealthy', you would not encounter the same results. They are not affected the same way as mammals.
 

Ellenantula

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I feed my GBB weekly as an adult. Since mine is quick to grab prey (and has webbed the mess out of her digs) mealworms are fine occasionally (meaning mealies have no chance to burrow on her webbing and no tong feeding is required). But as a staple diet, my AF GBB mostly gets B lats (and occasionally crickets).
 

cold blood

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I wouldn´t just feed them mealworms (they´re quite fatty). Crickets or Dubia is a better staple diet, but don´t be afraid to feed worms from time to time.
Mealworms are just fine as a staple part of the diet...I don't get all the anti-mealworm bias on these boards.
 

Trenor

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Tarantulas don't suffer the same conditions as mammals when it comes to high protein, high fat, diets. They don't process or store those nutrient by-products the same way as warm blooded organisms do.
If you have a tarantula with a large abdomen - they will be prone to more injuries than their slimmer counterparts. They have a higher chance of abdomen rupture or rubbing type injuries. Those are all external factors, though. As far as internally 'unhealthy' tarantulas, in the same way that mammals are 'unhealthy', you would not encounter the same results. They are not affected the same way as mammals.
That's was what I was thinking as well. A lot of the prey nutrition sheets for the prey we use are geared more towards reptiles then tarantulas. My bearded dragon has a lot more stringent nutrition requirements then any of my other pets.
 

cold blood

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I think that someone should measure the protein and fats in the different feeders.
After that, tarantula poo can be analyzed for residuals. That would be super interesting. :astonished:
This has been done, I've seen it posted over and over again over the years.
 
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