How long does my E.Campestratus REALLY have?

Otesha

Arachnopeon
Joined
May 10, 2016
Messages
30
I have posted about this little guy before when I didn't know if he was sick or not, and was met with a LOT of amazing and helpful information, followed by a proper identification on what species he actually is, rather than the G. Pulchripes I believed him to be when buying him.

I have run into another almost depressing snag however. I have no actual clue how much longer I have him for! D: This threat is not as important as most out there, those who require aid in the health of their little 8 legged buddies, but It's been keeping me up for some time. (I get way too attached, way too easily. ._. He's like my little buddy who hates being social, like me!)

Many sites and care sheets, as well as a few words of people on this site as well, say that his breed, the males have a comfortable lifespan of 8 - 10 years. This I hope for. There are Many MANY others however, videos of breeders and what not, who are very dead set in the belief that 3 - 4 years of the most these little dudes will ever see, unless born a lady spider. I guess I'm looking for someone who can confirm that they know for either fact, or have have one, or owns one now, that has lived, or is living past that assumed age range. Someone saying they've had theirs for 7 or so years would even help. He's almost three, is at the point he no longer barrows and instead sits for days in one corner of his tank, other than the occasional walk about. He's back to eating maybe once every one to two months, but hasn't slowed him down yet.

Attached is another picture I took of Mothball (The T in question) tonight in his little happy spot. The light is a temporary one I used so he would actually show up in the picture, since my room lights are broken and it's pretty much perpetually dark in his little area (Along with my other 3 T's). He gets upset if it's on too long, so I made sure to turn it off asap. IMG_3656.JPG
 

Andrea82

Arachnoemperor
Joined
Jan 12, 2016
Messages
3,610
After a male T matures, there really is no telling how long he will live. Some MM die after three months, others (like my P.cambridgei) live a year and a half. As far as I know, it doesn't matter which species it is, when males mature, every day is borrowed time.
There is only the estimated time between birth and maturing that is sometimes species specific. After it matures, nobody knows.
 

Otesha

Arachnopeon
Joined
May 10, 2016
Messages
30
After a male T matures, there really is no telling how long he will live. Some MM die after three months, others (like my P.cambridgei) live a year and a half. As far as I know, it doesn't matter which species it is, when males mature, every day is borrowed time.
There is only the estimated time between birth and maturing that is sometimes species specific. After it matures, nobody knows.
Well that's relatively heartbreaking.. ;__; He's a stubborn fella, so I still have some hope he'll surprise me as he's done many times so far, but I'll steel my nerves in case I wake up one morning and his clock's ticked it's last tock. Thank you!
 

Robyn8

Arachnoknight
Joined
Feb 24, 2016
Messages
195
Mothball is such a cute name :) I hope he will be with you for a long time.
 

Vanessa

Grammostola Groupie
Arachnosupporter
Joined
Mar 12, 2016
Messages
2,356
Have you been looking for a mate for him? Are you interested in doing so? The reason that I'm asking is that I am in Toronto as well and I believe there might be a couple of people with mature females about. This species is extremely difficult to find and I know that a number of people have been looking for them lately.
You might want to take a free ad out on Kijiji and ask if anyone has a female if you wanted to breed him. Just be careful that you screen anyone who replies and ensure that they have done it before. Also, there are experienced breeders at the expos held in the city and people often do breeding attempts at the expo with the help of experienced breeders.
 

Bugmom

Arachnolord
Joined
May 28, 2012
Messages
650
Have you been looking for a mate for him? Are you interested in doing so? The reason that I'm asking is that I am in Toronto as well and I believe there might be a couple of people with mature females about. This species is extremely difficult to find and I know that a number of people have been looking for them lately.
You might want to take a free ad out on Kijiji and ask if anyone has a female if you wanted to breed him. Just be careful that you screen anyone who replies and ensure that they have done it before. Also, there are experienced breeders at the expos held in the city and people often do breeding attempts at the expo with the help of experienced breeders.
Is that a Canadian thing? I got my sling as a freebie. I feel like they're plentiful in the states.
 

Otesha

Arachnopeon
Joined
May 10, 2016
Messages
30
It's the same here, hard to find mature specimens, slings can also be rare.
I'm not sure if I really want too.. I've been told he's very uncommon, I had an offer a good few months back someone offering me 100$ for him for their female but Since he was my first, I see him as a beloved pet and not really potential food fodder for hobbyists, the thought of him possibly getting eaten scares me, I can't lie. Unless it was 100000% safe, which I know it never is, I wouldn't be against it. Everyone deserves a bit of nookie in their lives. That, and with my luck, I wouldn't be allowed one sling from his efforts and he wouldn't make it out of it. .__.
 

Otesha

Arachnopeon
Joined
May 10, 2016
Messages
30
Have you been looking for a mate for him? Are you interested in doing so? The reason that I'm asking is that I am in Toronto as well and I believe there might be a couple of people with mature females about. This species is extremely difficult to find and I know that a number of people have been looking for them lately.
You might want to take a free ad out on Kijiji and ask if anyone has a female if you wanted to breed him. Just be careful that you screen anyone who replies and ensure that they have done it before. Also, there are experienced breeders at the expos held in the city and people often do breeding attempts at the expo with the help of experienced breeders.
I had a long talk about it with a friend, and after a bunch more picture taking and voicing worries, fears and concerns, I think I might actually see about giving it a try. My only thing would be I would possibly want him back, or make some form of deal that once the breeding is a success, I trade him for one of his offspring once they've grown to about an inch and a half to two inches, that way he could go to a home and live the rest of his short days getting all the nookie he wants and I can have a small part of his legacy. I don't wish to sell him, he's a beloved pet and passing him off for money doesn't feel right to me, I'd just want what's best for him, and dying alone, never to have acquired the joys of procreating doesn't sound very useful with the remainder of his time.
 

Andrea82

Arachnoemperor
Joined
Jan 12, 2016
Messages
3,610
I had a long talk about it with a friend, and after a bunch more picture taking and voicing worries, fears and concerns, I think I might actually see about giving it a try. My only thing would be I would possibly want him back, or make some form of deal that once the breeding is a success, I trade him for one of his offspring once they've grown to about an inch and a half to two inches, that way he could go to a home and live the rest of his short days getting all the nookie he wants and I can have a small part of his legacy. I don't wish to sell him, he's a beloved pet and passing him off for money doesn't feel right to me, I'd just want what's best for him, and dying alone, never to have acquired the joys of procreating doesn't sound very useful with the remainder of his time.
If you go for breeding, the slings you would get can not grow an inch or two before you have to say goodbye to your MM. Slings of this species grow very slow, that is why it is so hard to find adult spiders. A sling of this species can take 2, 3 years before getting to that size.
Your male will not live that long, sadly.
I understand your concerns, but with the right person, it won't be 'just fodder for hobbyists', which is a...weird way to call them, because hobbyists are actually the ones that care the most for their spiders, as opposed to local pet shops. I don't know where you got this idea, but it is not true.
 

Otesha

Arachnopeon
Joined
May 10, 2016
Messages
30
If you go for breeding, the slings you would get can not grow an inch or two before you have to say goodbye to your MM. Slings of this species grow very slow, that is why it is so hard to find adult spiders. A sling of this species can take 2, 3 years before getting to that size.
Your male will not live that long, sadly.
I understand your concerns, but with the right person, it won't be 'just fodder for hobbyists', which is a...weird way to call them, because hobbyists are actually the ones that care the most for their spiders, as opposed to local pet shops. I don't know where you got this idea, but it is not true.
between here and the many videos I have watched on youtube, most people are very caring towards their spiders, yes, but I've come across a few who've been very...Rude about the whole thing, there are those out there who apparently do it for a lot of money, and all I meant by it was I didn't wish to be tangled up with someone who says one thing, then means another and is looking to make nothing more than a profit off a hard to find breed of spider. It's not a matter of it not being true, it's a matter of it being rare and highly unlikely, but is still a risk. I didn't mean for it to sound as though I meant all breeders treat the males as just fodder. Everyone's had their own personal fears when it come to their first T's. Mothball is my first, All i want is for him, if he goes, to go to someone good. I am no breeder, I know -nothing- of that area of the hobby, but I do know that not everyone is good or honest.
 

awiec

Arachnoprince
Joined
Feb 13, 2014
Messages
1,329
between here and the many videos I have watched on youtube, most people are very caring towards their spiders, yes, but I've come across a few who've been very...Rude about the whole thing, there are those out there who apparently do it for a lot of money, and all I meant by it was I didn't wish to be tangled up with someone who says one thing, then means another and is looking to make nothing more than a profit off a hard to find breed of spider. It's not a matter of it not being true, it's a matter of it being rare and highly unlikely, but is still a risk. I didn't mean for it to sound as though I meant all breeders treat the males as just fodder. Everyone's had their own personal fears when it come to their first T's. Mothball is my first, All i want is for him, if he goes, to go to someone good. I am no breeder, I know -nothing- of that area of the hobby, but I do know that not everyone is good or honest.
There are all types of people in the hobby but I think the people who you may feel treat their males as "fodder" realize that once a male has matured, all there is left for him to do is breed. I feel that I at least owe it to this animal that I have kept in a little cage for all this time to have a shot to get a shot at his one purpose in life and feel a tinge of sadness for all of those males who don't even get a shot at breeding. My very first tarantula was a male (Bob) and I sent him off to breed which he did get eaten and we weren't sure if his inserts were good but I was content that he at least had his shot. I was surprised a few months later when the guy with the female said that she hid the sac and the slings hatched in cage and that he was coming up to my area to deliver my half of the sac. I have sold most of them off as of this time but I have kept several for myself to carry on the next generation of Bobs. I think you should look around for someone with a female as you can do a 50/50 split, keep some slings as a replacement for Mothball and sell/trade some to cover upkeep on your animals or get some new ones. Especially with slow growing uncommon species, all the males should have a shot so the species can continue to exist in the hobby (I don't think imports will continue to be a common thing).
 

Vanessa

Grammostola Groupie
Arachnosupporter
Joined
Mar 12, 2016
Messages
2,356
I appreciate your concerns and I know that there are many people in this area who have no clue what they're doing and will not be honest with you. There has been a lot of controversy over the years over breeding and people not being honest about their experience level or the results of the breeding. It happens a lot.
I took my male to the last expo and we tried there. I was comfortable with doing that and I took him home with me. That is why I brought it up as an option.
Another route you can take is to contact Amanda at Tarantula Canada and ask if she knows anyone who is reputable. When my male matured, that is the first thing I did.
I understand that there are risks to breeding, but I wouldn't put any of my tarantulas into the hands of someone who is breeding just for kicks and doesn't have a clue what they're doing. My guys matter to me, and where their offspring go matter to me too. I'm not a PetCo who has no problem putting animals into the hands of people who know nothing and are going to end up killing them within a year or two when the novelty wears off.
If you decide not to breed him, that is your choice and it is understandable. Believe me, I am the last person who is going to pressure someone into breeding. Mothball belongs to you and any decision you make is yours alone and should be respected. I only made the suggestion because it doesn't look like anyone will be importing that species any time soon and breeding him might be the only chance to have another couple of that species.
If he were another species, that is more common, I probably never would have even made the suggestion.
 
Last edited:

darkness975

dream reaper
Arachnosupporter +
Joined
Aug 31, 2012
Messages
3,906
Many sites and care sheets, as well as a few words of people on this site as well, say that his breed, the males have a comfortable lifespan of 8 - 10 years.
FYI for future reference - the word "breed" is for dogs. For Tarantulas you want to refer to them as different "species."
 

Otesha

Arachnopeon
Joined
May 10, 2016
Messages
30
FYI for future reference - the word "breed" is for dogs. For Tarantulas you want to refer to them as different "species."
Ahh, thank you for that! I wasn't entirely sure, but I'll use the proper wording from now on! :3
 

Otesha

Arachnopeon
Joined
May 10, 2016
Messages
30
I appreciate your concerns and I know that there are many people in this area who have no clue what they're doing and will not be honest with you. There has been a lot of controversy over the years over breeding and people not being honest about their experience level or the results of the breeding. It happens a lot.
I took my male to the last expo and we tried there. I was comfortable with doing that and I took him home with me. That is why I brought it up as an option.
Another route you can take is to contact Amanda at Tarantula Canada and ask if she knows anyone who is reputable. When my male matured, that is the first thing I did.
I understand that there are risks to breeding, but I wouldn't put any of my tarantulas into the hands of someone who is breeding just for kicks and doesn't have a clue what they're doing. My guys matter to me, and where their offspring go matter to me too. I'm not a PetCo who has no problem putting animals into the hands of people who know nothing and are going to end up killing them within a year or two when the novelty wears off.
If you decide not to breed him, that is your choice and it is understandable. Believe me, I am the last person who is going to pressure someone into breeding. Mothball belongs to you and any decision you make is yours alone and should be respected. I only made the suggestion because it doesn't look like anyone will be importing that species any time soon and breeding him might be the only chance to have another couple of that species.
If he were another species, that is more common, I probably never would have even made the suggestion.
I thank you very much for understanding, and as you and others who commented in this thread has mentioned, you're all right. It's my choice, but I believe it would be better for him to at least hopefully secure a legacy before he passes on. I wasn't able to make it to the last Expo that came to toronto due to being in the States to visit the husband, but I'm going to make a strong effort to be at the next one and see what I can do about helping him create another generation of baby mothballs. IF he gets eaten.. well.. I'll probably cry like a fool, but it's not as though it's something he wouldn't want. He would be perfectly willing to risk it all to mate, so least I can do is offer him that chance. Even if I get but one of his offspring from the ordeal, I'll feel more contented. It would be something to talk about with some people face to afce for sure, bring him with me so they can get a good look at him to make sure he's nourished enough to perform well. He's currently making another sperm web right now, so I believe the sooner the better. I appreciate all of the help you and others have given me, I REALLY do. All of this is a LOT better than sitting around upset and not knowing how long he has, but instead to try and make his last while the best it can be. By getting Spider Nookie. XD
 

Otesha

Arachnopeon
Joined
May 10, 2016
Messages
30
There are all types of people in the hobby but I think the people who you may feel treat their males as "fodder" realize that once a male has matured, all there is left for him to do is breed. I feel that I at least owe it to this animal that I have kept in a little cage for all this time to have a shot to get a shot at his one purpose in life and feel a tinge of sadness for all of those males who don't even get a shot at breeding. My very first tarantula was a male (Bob) and I sent him off to breed which he did get eaten and we weren't sure if his inserts were good but I was content that he at least had his shot. I was surprised a few months later when the guy with the female said that she hid the sac and the slings hatched in cage and that he was coming up to my area to deliver my half of the sac. I have sold most of them off as of this time but I have kept several for myself to carry on the next generation of Bobs. I think you should look around for someone with a female as you can do a 50/50 split, keep some slings as a replacement for Mothball and sell/trade some to cover upkeep on your animals or get some new ones. Especially with slow growing uncommon species, all the males should have a shot so the species can continue to exist in the hobby (I don't think imports will continue to be a common thing).
To say goodbye to Mothball would be pretty hard, but for the benefit of him being able to help secure more of his kind for future hobbyists and others to enjoy, I think I would be able to part with him. No guarantees I won't be emotional over it though! He's such a good little guy and has taught me so much. As for a 50/50, whoever I found to offer a female would probably be happy enough to hear that they would benefit from the deal much more, seeing as even if some of them don't survive, out of 50, that's still quite a bit of spiders, and I'm horrible at selling anything, even my own artwork, so I wouldn't be able to take half. Let alone my husband wasn't happy about me having 4 to begin with! It would be something else to discuss as well with the owner of the female to work something out. I'll be happy if I can raise even one or two of his offspring to maturity. It's a lot to think about, but the sooner the better is all i can say I suppose. Thank you very much for your advice and help, I appreciate it!
 

Andrea82

Arachnoemperor
Joined
Jan 12, 2016
Messages
3,610
I think you won't have trouble selling the slings, seeing as they're not readily available. You could also keep two or three (the more you keep, the bigger the chance you have of getting a female, which would be great, especially if you grow attached, females can live up to 15/20 years :) ), and sell the rest to another breeder or keeper.

Loved, liked, agreed, awarded your posts, but since we're allowed only one rating, I chose loved ;)
 

Otesha

Arachnopeon
Joined
May 10, 2016
Messages
30
I think you won't have trouble selling the slings, seeing as they're not readily available. You could also keep two or three (the more you keep, the bigger the chance you have of getting a female, which would be great, especially if you grow attached, females can live up to 15/20 years :) ), and sell the rest to another breeder or keeper.

Loved, liked, agreed, awarded your posts, but since we're allowed only one rating, I chose loved ;)
You've been such an amazing help, I'm really grateful. Gonna do that follow thing and if ya ever need anythin, just holler! <3
 
Top