How keep low humidity

erguayabero

Arachnopeon
Joined
Jul 29, 2010
Messages
22
i have a new GBB and I'm asking for some tips about how can i keep low the humidity??
Im thinking in put some coal under the substrate!!
 

MS6582

Arachnopeon
Joined
Nov 12, 2010
Messages
16
I'm just using the coconut fiber substrate but I dried mine for a couple days in the sun til it was dry as could be. I'm careful when filling the dish as to not spill some on the substrate and my humidity is around mid 40's to low 50's... this may work for you too, not sure what the humidty is in your house, mine has been dry lately so that is helping me too. Good luck!
 

Spiral_Stairs

Arachnosquire
Old Timer
Joined
Jan 15, 2004
Messages
79
unless the climate in your room resembles that of a tropical rain forest I wouldn't worry about it. Even then, GBB's are very hardy. Just keep it's water dish filled up (depending on size) and don't mist.
 

JimM

Arachnoangel
Old Timer
Joined
Nov 6, 2003
Messages
873
You don't even need to worry about a water dish, but providing one doesn't hurt.
No worrying about humidity with this species, just don't take steps to bring humidity up.
 

Stan Schultz

Arachnoprince
Old Timer
Joined
Jul 16, 2004
Messages
1,674
i have a new GBB and I'm asking for some tips about how can i keep low the humidity??
Im thinking in put some coal under the substrate!!
All you need do is increase ventilation and use a smaller water dish. (But still keep it full of fresh water.) In a few days the cage should dry out enough that humidity becomes a non-issue.

If the substrate remains damp, it may be too thick. A one inch (2.5 cm) thick layer or only slightly more is just fine. Much more than that is overkill.

Or, if you insist on allowing it to burrow in thick substrate, spread the substrate out on a piece of heavy cloth or canvass someplace in your home overnight or for a day or two until it dries out, then set the cage up again. Keeping the tarantula in a cottage cheese carton or deli cup for an evening will do it no harm. Consider it "camping out."

Beautiful tarantulas, and quite hardy if kept in a desert situation. Enjoy!
 

aquaArachnid

Arachnoknight
Old Timer
Joined
Feb 12, 2008
Messages
280
Have plenty of ventilation. I have 2 species that come from dry climates. I just use an ordinary screen top and they both do just fine.
 

jebbewocky

Arachnoangel
Old Timer
Joined
Oct 1, 2009
Messages
910
All you need do is increase ventilation and use a smaller water dish. (But still keep it full of fresh water.) In a few days the cage should dry out enough that humidity becomes a non-issue.

If the substrate remains damp, it may be too thick. A one inch (2.5 cm) thick layer or only slightly more is just fine. Much more than that is overkill.
Or, if you insist on allowing it to burrow in thick substrate, spread the substrate out on a piece of heavy cloth or canvass someplace in your home overnight or for a day or two until it dries out, then set the cage up again. Keeping the tarantula in a cottage cheese carton or deli cup for an evening will do it no harm. Consider it "camping out."

Beautiful tarantulas, and quite hardy if kept in a desert situation. Enjoy!
Depends on the size of the tank and the size of the spider.:D
You want to give enough to prevent falls.
I always give my T's, even arboreals, nice deep substrate in case they want to burrow. I got a bunch of 10 gallons for free a few months back, so I haver more than enough room to do so.
 

Joelolly

Arachnosquire
Joined
Oct 25, 2010
Messages
62
My gbb is at 1.5". Aren't I supposed to be keeping it at elevated humidity at this size?
 

Stan Schultz

Arachnoprince
Old Timer
Joined
Jul 16, 2004
Messages
1,674
My gbb is at 1.5". Aren't I supposed to be keeping it at elevated humidity at this size?
I presume this is leg span? If so, you're right at the tipping point. You should let the container dry out gradually over the next two or three molts. By the time it has a 2" (5 cm) leg span it should be in an effectively arid cage. No misting. No damp substrate, not even under the water dish.

Install a water dish that's approximately as wide as the tarantula's body length (about half the leg span), and about half that in depth. For most adult tarantulas something about the size and shape of a tuna fish can is good but don't obsess about the exact size. Water dishes for small animal pets from a pet shop will work well.

Place a small rock or chip of slate in the water dish so that a little of it protrudes above water level, but the tarantula still has lots of space to get down to the water level and drink. This is not to prevent the tarantula from drowning, as you might at first expect. It's to help prevent the crickets from drowning! Here's a photo of a bare bones cage for a Mexican redleg, Brachypelma emilia, but it would also work well for a greenbottle blue tarantula, Chromatopelma cyaneopubescens. (Click the thumbnail for a larger version.)



(Uploaded with ImageShack.us)

You can add ornaments and furnishings if you wish as long as they're safe: No sharp points or edges, no toxic substances, nothing that can rot or support mold or fungi if you accidentally get it wet. Ceramic and plastic aquarium ornaments are usually acceptable. Wood is "iffy" because it's porous and because it's notorious for molding in a damp cage. (GBBs require an arid cage so this shouldn't be a problem. I mention this because you might be keeping other tarantulas as well.)

Are you a newbie? Don't be offended. Many of us think of ourselves as being newbies even though we've been keeping tarantulas for decades. But, just in case, you might read http://people.ucalgary.ca/~schultz/stansrant.html.

Enjoy your little 8-legged buddy!
 

Nature81

Arachnopeon
Joined
Nov 20, 2010
Messages
21
This has been a very helpful post thank you. I should be picking my GBB up tomorrow and this was just the information I needed. I've also just got through reading the Tarantula Keepers Guide too so thank you Pikaia.

Zoe

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