How far up north?

Kenny

Arachnoknight
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Hi

Just had a thought.

I 've read/heard somewhere that one can find T's as far up as southern Ohio.:)

Is there any thruth in this?

What spieces would that be in that case , if so?

Kenny
 

Joy

Priestess of Pulchra-tude
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Originally posted by Kenny
Hi

Just had a thought.

I 've read/heard somewhere that one can find T's as far up as southern Ohio.:)

Is there any thruth in this?

What spieces would that be in that case , if so?

Kenny
I have heard they're found as far north as Kentucky, which would amount to about the same thing. The species in question would be Aphonopelma hentzi or similar.

Joy
 

superbug

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i've actually heard that there are a couple of species that are as far north as canada. i read it somewhere, but i have no idea exactly where they'd be.:confused:
 
T

Tarantula

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There is no truth to that at all. THere is no way a tarantula would survive a Southern Canadian winter. Not even in warmer places like Vancouver.
 

Wade

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There aren't supposed to be any native US T's east of the Mississippi river, which is going to rule out Ohio, I'm afraid.

Wade
 

Tarantula Lover

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hey

does anyone have a map of where T's are located in general? Are there any t's in MI at all? if so where? Thanks!

James
 

jezzy607

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From what I have read, the furthest north, a tarantula occurs on this continent is southern missouri, but rarely are they ever found(Aphonopelma sp. prob. hentzi). Last I heard someone, I don't remember their name, was working on the occurence of Aphonopelma hentzi in the state of MO through the university of MO, I think they were a Phd student. I wish I could remember where I found this info!
 

Mojo Jojo

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http://www.conservation.state.mo.us/nathis/arthopo/mospider/kinds.htm#anchor817168

It says that the Missouri River is what presumably prevents tarantulas from moving any further north in Missouri. Kansas City, Missouri is south of the Missouri River. And Kansas City is in the northern half of the state. But I guess many people still consider it to be Central Missouri. It is also is on the very west most border of the state.

I never saw one in the 26 years that I lived out there. But my mother told me that she has seen them a few different times. I've known others from that area who have claimed to have seen it too.

Jon

PS
Check out that website. It has some really good photos of spiders as well as some really good info on other MO wildlife stuff.
 

Spydra

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Wade said:
There aren't supposed to be any native US T's east of the Mississippi river, which is going to rule out Ohio, I'm afraid.

Wade

Actually, the Purse-web spider (Atypus affinis)

This spider belongs to the same suborder (Orthognatha) as tarantulas, funnel web spiders and trap-door spiders. Just one genus belonging to the family Atypidae is found in Britain, and it is represented by this species alone . The name of the suborder Orthognatha means ‘straight jawed’. This name refers to the chelicerae , a pair of appendages on the ‘head’ of the spider which are used to kill prey. In this suborder, the chelicerae project forwards from the carapace .


Renee
 

Spydra

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Wade said:
There aren't supposed to be any native US T's east of the Mississippi river, which is going to rule out Ohio, I'm afraid.

Wade

Actually, the Purse-web spider (Atypus affinis) is native to Ohio

This spider belongs to the same suborder (Orthognatha) as tarantulas, funnel web spiders and trap-door spiders. Just one genus belonging to the family Atypidae is found in Britain, and it is represented by this species alone . The name of the suborder Orthognatha means ‘straight jawed’. This name refers to the chelicerae , a pair of appendages on the ‘head’ of the spider which are used to kill prey. In this suborder, the chelicerae project forwards from the carapace .


Renee
 

Wade

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Sure, but it's not a tarantula, at least not defined by most people. The American Arachnological Society as well as most researchers, authors, and hobbyists, (not to mention the moderators of this site) consider the common name "tarantula" to refer to the family Theraphosidae exclusively. In the US anyway

Of course, the very name originates with a wolf spider...

Wade
 

WithCerberus

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Atypus affinus is a european species. We only have one species of Atypus in the US, Atypus snetsingeri. It is only found in Pennsylvania. The rest of our pursewebs are in the genus Sphodros. Sphodros niger can be found in Ohio, Michigan, and southern canada. It has been collected numerous times from Ontario. It has even been found on an island in Lake Erie, Ohio. You can also find several species of trapdoor spiders in ohio (Antrodiaetus unicolor and robustus). So plenty (hard to find :) ) of T-like spiders, but no Ts.

Bobby
 
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Greg Wolfe

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How far...

There are no native tarantulas east of the Mississippi River. Don't let anyone tell you otherwise.
As far as "north", the most northern species of tarantula in the U.S. is the "Colorado Brown", an Aphonopelma burrowing species that lives in southern Colorado, extreme southern Kansas and Missouri.
Greg
 

Garrick

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Rick West is cited as knowing of of Aphonopelma species native to 40 degrees L in California. . . that'd be north of Sacremento, as far north as Boulder in Colorado.

-Garrick

eight

Greg Wolfe said:
There are no native tarantulas east of the Mississippi River. Don't let anyone tell you otherwise.
As far as "north", the most northern species of tarantula in the U.S. is the "Colorado Brown", an Aphonopelma burrowing species that lives in southern Colorado, extreme southern Kansas and Missouri.
Greg
 

Vash71

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Oct 3, 2016
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Hi

Just had a thought.

I 've read/heard somewhere that one can find T's as far up as southern Ohio.:)

Is there any thruth in this?

What spieces would that be in that case , if so?

Kenny
Actually, with shipping and widespread development, just about anything is possible. And factor in the "animal abandonment, weather changes. What is is th b. Vagans that is now found in Florida, with a failed attempt at eradication. I think we're eventually going to have a need to redefine "native species".
In my profession they have found proven populations have move. This movement is from fleas to ticks, bed bugs, even wildlife.
 

mack1855

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as far north as Boulder in
Never heard any confirmed sightings that far north in Colorado.
If there is documented proof of A.chalcodes in Boulder,it was probably a released pet store/
collector release.I seriously doubt that it was a naturally occurring animal.
Having said that,there have been reports of them moving northward,and showing up in the
Colorado Springs area.For reference,thats 60 miles south of Denver.
Globel warming or climate change,you decide.
 
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