How do you feel about species that do lots of webbing?

How do you feel about species that do lots of webbing?


  • Total voters
    50

basin79

ArachnoGod
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Sep 14, 2013
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Absolutely love it. My Chilobrachys Fimbriatus has webbed her enclosure up like crazy. It looks amazing.
 

Bugmom

Arachnolord
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May 28, 2012
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Webbing is one of the best things about owning some tarantula species.
 

chanda

Arachnoking
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Jun 27, 2010
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It's really fun to watch them transform their enclosures! I love the heavy webbers - even if they are a bit hard to see sometimes. At least the webbing gives you something to look at - as opposed to some of the pet holes that spend all their time in a burrow!
 

Bread

Arachnopeon
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May 11, 2016
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I love lots of web, I also noticed that a thin layer of web from my C.darlingi is LOADS stronger than that from my GBB.
 

EulersK

Arachnonomicon
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Feb 22, 2013
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When did this...

... become more beautiful than this?

All tarantulas are beautiful. Stop web shaming today. #FangedBeauties
 

Ungoliant

Malleus Aranearum
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I started with true spiders that live in webs, so I am fond of tarantulas that web, even if you don't always get to see them. It's neat to see how they modify their enclosures over time.
 

viper69

ArachnoGod
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I started with true spiders that live in webs, so I am fond of tarantulas that web, even if you don't always get to see them. It's neat to see how they modify their enclosures over time.
That's exactly why I like Ts that web. I observe my webbers and incei does the most changes to webbing pattern for what I own. They are way overlooked as a species. GBBs are heavy, thick webbers, but my GBBs never made something like my incei do.
 

Ungoliant

Malleus Aranearum
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That's exactly why I like Ts that web. I observe my webbers and incei does the most changes to webbing pattern for what I own. They are way overlooked as a species. GBBs are heavy, thick webbers, but my GBBs never made something like my incei do.
I will probably get some of those incei one day. (For webbers, I currently have two Avicularia avicularia, one 2.25" Chromatopelma cyaneopubescens, and one 2" Dolichothele diamantinensis.)
 

viper69

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I will probably get some of those incei one day. (For webbers, I currently have two Avicularia avicularia, one 2.25" Chromatopelma cyaneopubescens, and one 2" Dolichothele diamantinensis.)
Get Cold Bloods N. incei Gold, I have 2 of his Golds, 3 normals, they are great! Great eaters, they do not disappoint in any way IMO.
 

Jeff23

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Jul 27, 2016
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My psalm pulchers are going crazy with web. And it is hilarious when they know I am opening the lid; They simply turn around and look down into the cup hoping I don't see their fat butts sticking out of the web tubes.
 

nicodimus22

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I may be in the minority here, but I don't prefer lots of webbing. I can try to explain my line of thinking on the subject...I view tarantulas to be almost in the same vein as tropical fish, in the sense that the primary reason to have them isn't to pet them, but rather to see them in all their beautiful shapes and colors. My goal with them is not to build a large collection, but eventually to have several large display Ts (probably all NW terrestrials) that will be in glass aquariums throughout my house so I can enjoy looking at them easily. Some species are described as 'ghosts' or 'pet holes' and that's just not what I'm after. Some of them are very beautiful indeed, but if they're hidden by web most of the time, I would enjoy owning them a lot less. That's just me, though.
 

Ungoliant

Malleus Aranearum
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I may be in the minority here, but I don't prefer lots of webbing. . . . Some of them are very beautiful indeed, but if they're hidden by web most of the time, I would enjoy owning them a lot less. That's just me, though.
Luckily for us, there is a tarantula to suit almost every taste: webbers, burrowers, arboreals, terrestrials that sit out in the open, large, small, defensive, docile, fast, slow....
 

Spidermolt

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May 29, 2015
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No mater what type of T you may have no Sp. is no more interesting and as artistic as a webber. :D
 

Jeff23

Arachnolord
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Jul 27, 2016
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I may be in the minority here, but I don't prefer lots of webbing. I can try to explain my line of thinking on the subject...I view tarantulas to be almost in the same vein as tropical fish, in the sense that the primary reason to have them isn't to pet them, but rather to see them in all their beautiful shapes and colors. My goal with them is not to build a large collection, but eventually to have several large display Ts (probably all NW terrestrials) that will be in glass aquariums throughout my house so I can enjoy looking at them easily. Some species are described as 'ghosts' or 'pet holes' and that's just not what I'm after. Some of them are very beautiful indeed, but if they're hidden by web most of the time, I would enjoy owning them a lot less. That's just me, though.
I wouldn't necessarily exclude any tarantula that has a lot of web in that case.

My C. cyaneopubescens (GBB) slings are always out in the open in full view though they web up every thing in their path. They never move far even when they detect my presence.

For arboreal T's, my Psalm Pulcher slings are always sitting at the top of their arboreal spiral web right under the lid. They will partially hide if you open the container. They will go down into the nest if startled in a higher degree. From my understanding they become even less skittish after they become adults. Mine are close to juvenile stage. They are actually more viewable than my Avic's though their web is a lot thicker.

If you want less web, P. bromelicola might be a good choice as an arboreal T. My slings produce a lot less web than an Avic (so far) and are not very skittish. I open the lid and they will sometimes be right near the lip. They have never tried to escape but don't go into a defense posture either. But mine haven't molted yet so I don't know if they web up more for that process.

EDIT* Someone who owns adults in these can provide better opinions for adult sized T's.
 
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