How do i stop crickets eating eachother?

Chad Peace

Arachnosquire
Joined
Jul 5, 2016
Messages
88
I bought crickets from the pet store to feed my 2 Ts and they just end up eating eachother, is there a way to prevent this?
 

magicmed

Arachnobaron
Joined
Jun 4, 2016
Messages
403
Yup just feed them. Foods gotta eat. As @cold blood said a couple pieces of kibble and maybe a carrot slice for water and you're gold
 

cold blood

Moderator
Staff member
Joined
Jan 19, 2014
Messages
11,872
Yup just feed them. Foods gotta eat. As @cold blood said a couple pieces of kibble and maybe a carrot slice for water and you're gold
I actually keep a 2 liter bottle cap (filled with rocks) with water in with my crickets. Whenever I first get them, you should see them pile in to get drinks. I've literally never had a single one drown.
 

Aquarimax

Arachnoprince
Joined
Mar 1, 2014
Messages
1,057
As others have said, both food and hydration are needed to keep cricket cannibalism down.

That said, crickets will still cannibalize to some extent, even with all the food and water they need.

I have been breeding crickets for a while, and they inevitably nibble on each other a bit. I still produce plenty of crickets to feed my pets, as long as I keep the crickets well fed and hydrated.
 

JumpingSpiderLady

Arachnobaron
Joined
Jul 29, 2016
Messages
342
Don't use those gel foods. They're junk. Went into the pet store two weeks after buying 40 or so crickets and the cashier remembered me. He was shocked mine were still alive and I didn't need more. I told him, "You just gotta feed 'em actual food!" I give mine fish food and carrots. Mist the side of thier home once or twice a day for them to drink.
 

Ceymann

Arachnosquire
Joined
Jul 3, 2016
Messages
124
I have been using fish food, Apple slices and ground up rolled oats
with good success.
 

cold blood

Moderator
Staff member
Joined
Jan 19, 2014
Messages
11,872
Don't use those gel foods. They're junk. Went into the pet store two weeks after buying 40 or so crickets and the cashier remembered me. He was shocked mine were still alive and I didn't need more. I told him, "You just gotta feed 'em actual food!" I give mine fish food and carrots. Mist the side of thier home once or twice a day for them to drink.
With as dirty as they are, misting isn't an avenue I'd ever go down with crickets....I use water, most simply use lettuce.
 

cold blood

Moderator
Staff member
Joined
Jan 19, 2014
Messages
11,872
Op, proper "cover" is also a good preventative measure, if you don't, put in an egg carton or two.
 

raisinjelly

Arachnoknight
Joined
Oct 24, 2014
Messages
207
In addition to keeping them well fed, give them as much room to get away from each other as you possibly can. Crickets in the wild are solitary animals, so being kept so crowded together is unnatural for them and probably why they die off if you so much as glance at them. Also, go through the cage each day to remove garbage like dead crickets and molts.

Good food, space, ventilation, and hygiene will do a lot for extending crickets' lives
 

sschind

Arachnobaron
Old Timer
Joined
May 27, 2005
Messages
344
I don't know about the gel food as I never used it (way too expensive) but I use the water gel quite a bit. Buy it in bulk and its cheap and goes a long way. I've found its much easier to control the humidity in the cages than simply throwing in wet veggies. I have a dish of water gel and most of the food I use is a dry concoction of my own making. Most of my veggies and stuff like that goes to my roaches anyway.
 

sschind

Arachnobaron
Old Timer
Joined
May 27, 2005
Messages
344
As others have said, both food and hydration are needed to keep cricket cannibalism down.

That said, crickets will still cannibalize to some extent, even with all the food and water they need.

I have been breeding crickets for a while, and they inevitably nibble on each other a bit. I still produce plenty of crickets to feed my pets, as long as I keep the crickets well fed and hydrated.
I've given up on breeding crickets. I have no problem getting them to breed and getting thousands of pin heads, and once they have molted 3 times or so they are very hardy but I lose about 95% of them in the first 2 molts so its not worth it. Care to share anytips on how you get them past the first 2 molts. I'm guessing my problem is a combination of temperature and humidity.
 

Chris LXXIX

ArachnoGod
Active Member
Joined
Dec 25, 2014
Messages
5,689
What work for me is this: I keep crickets, from medium to adults (the little and the millimeter ones are separate from those) into a XL KK, no substrate at all, those egg stuff for hide (that I change every week btw) and for food/water only fresh, well cleaned carrots and that cricket only fodder which I honestly I haven't a clue about the exact, proper, English name. Nothing else, loss to minimum.
 

Aquarimax

Arachnoprince
Joined
Mar 1, 2014
Messages
1,057
I've given up on breeding crickets. I have no problem getting them to breed and getting thousands of pin heads, and once they have molted 3 times or so they are very hardy but I lose about 95% of them in the first 2 molts so its not worth it. Care to share anytips on how you get them past the first 2 molts. I'm guessing my problem is a combination of temperature and humidity.
I would be happy to share how I do it, hopefully something will help. I keep my cricket bin warm with a nocturnal reptile light, wattage varies with the season from 75-150. The hotspot (where I keep the eggcrate) gets up to the 90s F in the summer, mid 80s in winter. The cool side gets down to the mid 70s in the winter, and is usually 78-82 F in the summer. (I use a temp gun to check temps).

I live in a fairly dry climate, and my cricket bin is well ventilated. I make no particular effort to monitor or regulate humidity in the container as a whole. I am sure the water crystals, as well as daily misting of the coco fiber in the laying and hatching containers, contribute to the humidity.

The nursery chamber within the main bin is kept on the cool side of the bin. As for the adults, I always provide water crystals. The staple food is the chick grower pellets I use for our chickens. I supplement with Omega One fish food pellets, and frequent bits of various fruits and vegetables.

For shelter, I provide paper towel tubes, ripped into approximately 2 inch lengths and crushed so that they are mostly flat.

I have to make sure that there aren't too many older crickets in the nursery chamber, or they'll start attacking the tiny juveniles.

Every week or so, (usually when I notice a lot of hatchlings) switch the laying container into the nursery bin, and dump out the older coconut fiber from the nursery container and put a container of fresh coco fiber back into the main bin as a laying container.

I haven't noticed an age at which hatchlings die off. There just seem to be plenty of them all the time, unless my light bulb fails, or if I forget to switch laying substrate into the nursery chamber. Those have been the only setbacks I've experienced. Is there anything I am doing that seems radically different from what you are doing? Hopefully I haven't missed anything.
 
Top