How can I tell if a male is penultimate

Jacobchinarian

Arachnoknight
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Aug 2, 2010
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So my supposed to be female theraphosa burgundy who after viewing the epiandrouse fusillea, spelling? I determined was male just molted. It is about 8-9 inches but I haven't measured it because it's still so fragile from the molt. So anyway I think he might be penultimate. Is there any way to tell.
 

Falk

Arachnodemon
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May 28, 2009
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look for the embolus at the end of the pedipalps
 

Mack&Cass

Arachnoprince
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Oct 14, 2007
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Penultimate means the molt before maturity. If you're wondering if he's had is ultimate molt, or is mature, then check for emboli at the end of his palps.

Cass
 

Mack&Cass

Arachnoprince
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I remember reading that males have a set amount of molts before maturity, but there's no chart or anything that states how many for each species. There are no physical signs of a male being penultimate, it's pretty much just guessing based on size. I've never had any Theraphosa so I'm not sure what their average size before maturity is, so maybe someone with more experience with that particular species will chime in.

Cass
 

Falk

Arachnodemon
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Ok sorry:eek: never heard pinultimate before and i thought you mean it was adult.
 

matthias

Arachnobaron
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Ok thanks but how can I tell if he is Penultimate.
It is not always easy, I've thought my burgandy was penultimate for three molts be fore he matured.

Some times if the species develop hooks you can see a little notch in the leg where the apophysis will develop.
I know with A. versicolors the males have a "little blue dot" just above the epigastric fold. Other than that it is a guess and a bit of luck.
 

Scourge

Arachnoknight
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Jan 3, 2005
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You can make a fair guess by the size or age of the spider. Also in some species by colouration, for instance Pamphobeteus and Xenesthis males become much more colourful. But in most species the easiest way to tell is to look at the end of the palps. Most penultimate males will start to show some swelling where the emboli are developing, and the end of the palps will become more pear shaped.
 
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