Housing a Mexican Red Knee

semsan

Arachnopeon
Joined
Sep 20, 2022
Messages
5
I am planning on housing a Mexican Red Knee soon. Those who own them, how do you have them set up>? Tank size, type of substrate, temp, and humidity.
 

NMTs

Arachno-afflicted
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Jan 22, 2022
Messages
737
I am planning on housing a Mexican Red Knee soon. Those who own them, how do you have them set up>? Tank size, type of substrate, temp, and humidity.
Welcome to the boards!

Do you know the scientific name of the specimen you'll be receiving? Brachypelma smithi, B. hamorri, or something else? It doesn't make a huge difference because they all have similar requirements, but it'll help you find the info you need if you can search by the correct name. Also, are you getting a spiderling, or a larger specimen (juvenile or adult)? Do you have any experience keeping tarantulas, or will this be your first one?

Enclosure size depends on how big the T is going to be.
Substrate is easy - use coco fiber or top soil (without any additives like fertilizer), or a mix. Reptisoil or similar is OK, but is an unnecessary expense.
Temp and humidity - room temp (70-ish degrees F) is fine, no supplemental heat needed. Humidity isn't something you need to be tracking, just add water to the substrate occasionally so there's a moist corner in the enclosure, and keep a full water dish. That's it.

If this is your first, check this out for many good links and useful info:
 

viper69

ArachnoGod
Old Timer
Joined
Dec 8, 2006
Messages
16,312
I am planning on housing a Mexican Red Knee soon. Those who own them, how do you have them set up>? Tank size, type of substrate, temp, and humidity.
What has your research on the forum told you?
 

semsan

Arachnopeon
Joined
Sep 20, 2022
Messages
5
Welcome to the boards!

Do you know the scientific name of the specimen you'll be receiving? Brachypelma smithi, B. hamorri, or something else? It doesn't make a huge difference because they all have similar requirements, but it'll help you find the info you need if you can search by the correct name. Also, are you getting a spiderling, or a larger specimen (juvenile or adult)? Do you have any experience keeping tarantulas, or will this be your first one?

Enclosure size depends on how big the T is going to be.
Substrate is easy - use coco fiber or top soil (without any additives like fertilizer), or a mix. Reptisoil or similar is OK, but is an unnecessary expense.
Temp and humidity - room temp (70-ish degrees F) is fine, no supplemental heat needed. Humidity isn't something you need to be tracking, just add water to the substrate occasionally so there's a moist corner in the enclosure, and keep a full water dish. That's it.

If this is your first, check this out for many good links and useful info:
Hi, I'm planning on Brachypelma smithi. Should I add any decorations to the enclosure, or live plants native to Mexico? I know they like having a hide,
Also, how often is occasionally for watering the substrate? I don't want to drown it.
Also, this would be my first tarantula, I've been interested in them for a bit and have finally decided I want to house one, and I'm doing the research right now, and I'm planning on doing research for a month before I get it. I want to try and get a juvenile, but an adult is OK too. Sorry if these questions are dumb.
.
 

NMTs

Arachno-afflicted
Arachnosupporter +
Joined
Jan 22, 2022
Messages
737
Hi, I'm planning on Brachypelma smithi. Should I add any decorations to the enclosure, or live plants native to Mexico? I know they like having a hide,
Also, how often is occasionally for watering the substrate? I don't want to drown it.
Also, this would be my first tarantula, I've been interested in them for a bit and have finally decided I want to house one, and I'm doing the research right now, and I'm planning on doing research for a month before I get it. I want to try and get a juvenile, but an adult is OK too. Sorry if these questions are dumb.
.
You can add decorations as long as they aren't heavy - nothing like big rocks or ceramics that could shift and squish the T if it digs under it. Live plants are best avoided because you end up sacrificing the needs of the T for the plants or vice versa. Fake plants are fine and look nice. Water the substrate when the top 1-2" are dry, which depending on how quickly it evaporates, may be every one or two weeks. Don't do it on a schedule, just do it as needed so it doesn't get swampy.

Also, can't stress this enough - if you haven't read through this thread and the links within it, you need to do so. Great info for everyone, not just beginners (but especially beginners):
 

Matt Man

Arachnoprince
Active Member
Joined
Jul 4, 2017
Messages
1,545
no live native plants. The moisture requirement to support live plants will most likely be too high for a T. It can be done, but is best left for people with experience. Make sure the hide can't crush them and make sure there isn't so much tank space it provides a fall risk. Done.
Some form of hide / burrow, dirt, water dish.Anything else is for your pleasure, not theirs
 

semsan

Arachnopeon
Joined
Sep 20, 2022
Messages
5
no live native plants. The moisture requirement to support live plants will most likely be too high for a T. It can be done, but is best left for people with experience. Make sure the hide can't crush them and make sure there isn't so much tank space it provides a fall risk. Done.
Some form of hide / burrow, dirt, water dish.Anything else is for your pleasure, not theirs
Ooh, okay. That makes sense! Thank you
 

semsan

Arachnopeon
Joined
Sep 20, 2022
Messages
5
You can add decorations as long as they aren't heavy - nothing like big rocks or ceramics that could shift and squish the T if it digs under it. Live plants are best avoided because you end up sacrificing the needs of the T for the plants or vice versa. Fake plants are fine and look nice. Water the substrate when the top 1-2" are dry, which depending on how quickly it evaporates, may be every one or two weeks. Don't do it on a schedule, just do it as needed so it doesn't get swampy.

Also, can't stress this enough - if you haven't read through this thread and the links within it, you need to do so. Great info for everyone, not just beginners (but especially beginners):
Thank you for the links to information, I'll look at them. : )
 

DustyD

Arachnosquire
Arachnosupporter
Joined
Apr 4, 2021
Messages
102
Cork bark is good. Light and natural looking although not native to its natural habitat. I like that you are asking questions BEFORE you acquired a T, but as everyone else has stated, do a lot of research on your own.
 

joossa

Arachnobaron
Joined
Nov 21, 2020
Messages
316
I use critter keepers, fake plants, and either resin or cork hides for most my Brachypelma and similar. I wet a corner of the sub once every 2 or 3 weeks.

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