Help with Whip Spider identification

MAD5

Arachnopeon
Joined
Apr 7, 2021
Messages
5
Oi, first post here.
I just adopted a little tailless whip scorpion. Bit of an impulse decision, but i regret nothing.
Thing is, now i'd like to know exactly what she is (from what i could gather, i'm pretty sure she's female). I've looked around but i'm really no expert, and all i could figure out is that she's unlikely to be from the Damon genus. But i could be wrong even about that.

Can anyone here help me pinpoint her exact specie, and if possible, what gives it away?

BB00005.JPG
 

DreadMan

Arachnosquire
Active Member
Joined
Apr 4, 2021
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65
Depends on the size. If shes small to medium size, I would assume shes from the phryrus genus. The coloring leads me the believe she is Phrynus whitei. I zoomed in and saw two red dots at the sides of her eyes, which confirms this theory. Then again, Amblypygi have similar builds to each other, so they can be quite hard to categorize. I recommend keeping her in a semi tropical environment, but Amblypygi are very hardy, so a dry environment shouldn't kill it. If you could send another pic with a some more light that would be great :)
 

MAD5

Arachnopeon
Joined
Apr 7, 2021
Messages
5
Depends on the size. If shes small to medium size, I would assume shes from the phryrus genus. The coloring leads me the believe she is Phrynus whitei. I zoomed in and saw two red dots at the sides of her eyes, which confirms this theory. Then again, Amblypygi have similar builds to each other, so they can be quite hard to categorize. I recommend keeping her in a semi tropical environment, but Amblypygi are very hardy, so a dry environment shouldn't kill it. If you could send another pic with a some more light that would be great :)
She is rather small compared to other Amblypigi i've seen in videos and whatnot, though i have no idea how old she really is (The guy at the store said she was young but in a way that made me feel like he had no idea either :p).

I've been keeping her environment pretty moist, with genrous sprinklings of water twice a day. She seems to have adopted a cozy hiding spot in between 2 small logs, and has been pretty active almost every day once the sun goes down.

Looking up Phrynus, it definitely seems to be in the right ball-park so thanks a lot for that hint. Though now i'm starting to doubt the female theory, as the only metric i've been made aware of to determine sex is the length of the pedipalps compared to the first set of legs, but Phrynus seem to have naturaly shorter ones? Any thoughts there?

BB00006.jpg
 

DreadMan

Arachnosquire
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Yea I used
She is rather small compared to other Amblypigi i've seen in videos and whatnot, though i have no idea how old she really is (The guy at the store said she was young but in a way that made me feel like he had no idea either :p).

I've been keeping her environment pretty moist, with genrous sprinklings of water twice a day. She seems to have adopted a cozy hiding spot in between 2 small logs, and has been pretty active almost every day once the sun goes down.

Looking up Phrynus, it definitely seems to be in the right ball-park so thanks a lot for that hint. Though now i'm starting to doubt the female theory, as the only metric i've been made aware of to determine sex is the length of the pedipalps compared to the first set of legs, but Phrynus seem to have naturaly shorter ones? Any thoughts there?

View attachment 381006
Yea I used to keep Phrynus marginemaculata, and they seem to not grow at all after their first few molts. This is most definitely a Phrynus, meaning that I myself cant sex it. Usually its the pedipalps size that shows off, but for Phrynus thats not a true at all. If you are looking to breed them, I cant help you there. My closest assumptions are that the species is either longipes or whitei, and longipes is cannibalistic, so definitely dont keep them together. Other than that, I think you are all set. It is big enough to to feed it things like wax worms or cockroaches, so try to change up its diet once in a while. I recommend having a little pool of water at the bottom like a pool, because mine used to clean themselves with it. I hope this helps :)
 

MAD5

Arachnopeon
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Apr 7, 2021
Messages
5
Yea I used

Yea I used to keep Phrynus marginemaculata, and they seem to not grow at all after their first few molts. This is most definitely a Phrynus, meaning that I myself cant sex it. Usually its the pedipalps size that shows off, but for Phrynus thats not a true at all. If you are looking to breed them, I cant help you there. My closest assumptions are that the species is either longipes or whitei, and longipes is cannibalistic, so definitely dont keep them together. Other than that, I think you are all set. It is big enough to to feed it things like wax worms or cockroaches, so try to change up its diet once in a while. I recommend having a little pool of water at the bottom like a pool, because mine used to clean themselves with it. I hope this helps :)
Absolutely it does, thanks a lot! Good to know about the cannibalistic thing just in case HAHA. I'll keep up the research but that definitely helps orient it.
 

Collin Clary

Arachnobaron
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Jul 3, 2011
Messages
435
It's definitely a Phrynus species but I'm not familiar enough with the genus to identify it beyond that.
 

Sarkhan42

Arachnoangel
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Dec 29, 2015
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789
This is a Phrynus cf whitei from Nicaragua, at adult size or close to adult size. I'd wager this is a female but if you post a ventral shot I can give you a more confident sexing. Keep quite humid, with some wide vertical space to climb- I use Styrofoam boards, but some people like cork bark or cork board.
 

MAD5

Arachnopeon
Joined
Apr 7, 2021
Messages
5
This is a Phrynus cf whitei from Nicaragua, at adult size or close to adult size. I'd wager this is a female but if you post a ventral shot I can give you a more confident sexing. Keep quite humid, with some wide vertical space to climb- I use Styrofoam boards, but some people like cork bark or cork board.
I like the confidence of that answer.
Was a weird photoshoot, but i managed to get a clear shot of the belly between my fingers. Didn't really know what to look for though, so i don't know if it'll be enough?
Which brings me to a question, if you don't mind: What are the telling sings for sexing?

BB00007.jpg
 

Sarkhan42

Arachnoangel
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Definitely looks female to me. I actually just answered the same question here!: https://arachnoboards.com/threads/amblypygid-id.344377/#post-3169531

I do have some follow up now though- the photo is grainy and its rather late here, but I swear I can see some circular shapes in the opaque membranes between tergites. I'd go ahead and take a closer look in person to confirm. Given she's wild caught, there's a decent chance she may pop eggs for you. I actually just had a wild caught female on eggs have her babies myself.
 

DreadMan

Arachnosquire
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This is a Phrynus cf whitei from Nicaragua, at adult size or close to adult size. I'd wager this is a female but if you post a ventral shot I can give you a more confident sexing. Keep quite humid, with some wide vertical space to climb- I use Styrofoam boards, but some people like cork bark or cork board.
Would whitei become cannibalistic?
 

Sarkhan42

Arachnoangel
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Would whitei become cannibalistic?
Currently from what we know- yes, I wouldn’t suggest keeping more than a sexed pair together for breeding.

I’m however hoping to maybe experiment a bit myself to see how true that is, as I’ve seen some signs that might suggest otherwise.
 

MAD5

Arachnopeon
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Apr 7, 2021
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Definitely looks female to me. I actually just answered the same question here!: https://arachnoboards.com/threads/amblypygid-id.344377/#post-3169531

I do have some follow up now though- the photo is grainy and its rather late here, but I swear I can see some circular shapes in the opaque membranes between tergites. I'd go ahead and take a closer look in person to confirm. Given she's wild caught, there's a decent chance she may pop eggs for you. I actually just had a wild caught female on eggs have her babies myself.
All the thanks, mate. I think i see the difference from the picture in the other thread. Few other creatures have been quite as exciting to learn about, for me!
I'll keep an eye out for babies, just in case.
 

Albireo Wulfbooper

Arachnodemon
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All amblypygi will cannibalize if they are hungry and/or feel like it. Some are somewhat more territorial than others. Few species in the hobby are even vaguely willing to cohabitate outside of temporary breeding situations.

Phrynus will appreciate a moist environment, and don't need a great deal of airflow. They are generally unlikely to use a water dish, but of course there can be exceptions. Mine will sometimes drink drips off the wall in the winter when the substrate dries out faster. Dessication is the biggest risk to these, as well as live prey running loose while they're moulting. Keep the environment simple with a nice tall cork or styrofoam board to climb and moult off of. Enjoy your lovely beast!
 

DreadMan

Arachnosquire
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Joined
Apr 4, 2021
Messages
65
All amblypygi will cannibalize if they are hungry and/or feel like it. Some are somewhat more territorial than others. Few species in the hobby are even vaguely willing to cohabitate outside of temporary breeding situations.

Phrynus will appreciate a moist environment, and don't need a great deal of airflow. They are generally unlikely to use a water dish, but of course there can be exceptions. Mine will sometimes drink drips off the wall in the winter when the substrate dries out faster. Dessication is the biggest risk to these, as well as live prey running loose while they're moulting. Keep the environment simple with a nice tall cork or styrofoam board to climb and moult off of. Enjoy your lovely beast!
Yea but some are social. Phrynus marginemaculatus wont eat each other unless totally starving.
 

Albireo Wulfbooper

Arachnodemon
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770
Yea but some are social. Phrynus marginemaculatus wont eat each other unless totally starving.
That's why I said "few species in the hobby" and not "no species". Even those will cannibalize occasionally, though it's considerably less common.
 
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