Help with crickets?

Cranker

Arachnopeon
Joined
Feb 16, 2010
Messages
7
Hey everyone, I have a bit of a problem, so I figured I'd ask the bug people. Haha. Anyways, I have a couple of tarantulas and reptiles, so of course I feed them crickets. Now a few weeks ago, those little things kept escaping. So I ended up putting them in the sink (incase they got out, I could wash them down the drain) so then I got a cricket complaint from my apparently complex saying they were everywhere. But no one shares ac/heating vents, we all have our own. So unless they walk out of my front door, down the halls, and into other peoples houses, I see no way it could have been a problem. But now I've been thinking. (this is where you guys come in). Is it even slightly possible that the crickets I washed down the drain got into other peoples houses through the through the drain lines? Or would they drown or something. I guess I don't really know how tough these things are. Any suggestions?


Thanks.
 

catfishrod69

Arachnoemperor
Joined
Oct 1, 2010
Messages
4,402
it seems like crickets drown very easy....and its very possible that they are going out the door and down the hall....whenever i have some escape, i find them in the craziest places
 

Midknight xrs

Arachnosquire
Old Timer
Joined
May 25, 2010
Messages
132
flushing them down the drain will do just that. every apartment (i assume an apartment) has it's own set of drains that only allow it to drain to the sewer, not someone else's apartment. Now if your direct neighbors are having crickets show up, then those may be the escape's but there is still a possibility that that will travel further.

This could be a good time for investment in roaches, maybe lateralis or dubia. i had crickets for a few weeks, they escaped or just died and said ok, raoch time. and neither of those species from my readings will infest.
 

ZergFront

Arachnoprince
Old Timer
Joined
May 2, 2009
Messages
1,959
I'd be surprised if they were re-emerging from a used sink. I've had adult crickets drown in a milk cap of water.

However, some could have gotten out when the cage was open; likely with your back turned. I still find an occasional cricket in our bathroom once in a while I can't explain. They can get under the door crack.
 

Vfox

Arachnobaron
Old Timer
Joined
Sep 1, 2007
Messages
530
I hate crickets so much, I keep quite a few spp of roaches now, much much better. As for the escapees, they are sneaky but short lived. they could be wild crickets though, it is the time of year that critters start heading indoors afterall.
 

v1641

Arachnopeon
Joined
Nov 21, 2010
Messages
4
The crickets seem to be very interesting insects. It is very difficult to manage and keep them. First reason is that they are waiting for a chance to escape. So keeping them from moving out is a big problem. Keeping them in a sink is not a good idea. They may get out of the sink and can go everywhere. But there is no chance that they will go through the drain. It could be a nuisance to people who don’t like such insects.
 

Galapoheros

ArachnoGod
Old Timer
Joined
Jul 4, 2005
Messages
8,991
Drains are required to have "pea traps" that hold water that keeps really nice smell from coming up, they won't get past those, it's "u" shaped and always full of water. They may wash down alive but wouldn't be able to go through one on the way up. My feeders are dubias, hisser nymphs and Surinam roaches, but crickets are really good feeders imo. I'm going to get some tomorrow and raise some again. I'm not going to use egg crates this time, but curled bark from my wood pile. I liked raising them but I had the luxury of putting them in another room where I couldn't hear them. How are they getting out? They can't climb smooth mailing tape, you can put it around the inside. Is the container not tall enough ...lid is too loose?
 

paassatt

Arachnoangel
Joined
Nov 19, 2010
Messages
887
I'd be surprised if they were re-emerging from a used sink. QUOTE]

One time while doing some cricket critter keeper maintenance, one jumped out towards freedom but ended up in the bathroom sink. Rather than risk putting him back with his friends and eventually feeding him to my T (possibly picked up something nasty up from being in the sink) I casually brushed him in the drain and ran some water for a few seconds for good measure. The next morning I went into the bathroom to find the cricket sitting in the sink, calm as could be. Needless to say, I was quite amazed.
 

roony2111

Arachnopeon
Joined
Apr 13, 2011
Messages
1
Try this measure

Hey Cranker.Crickets are part of the family Gryllidae. These are insects that are partially related to grasshoppers. These have a close affinity with katydids or bush crickets.I can suggest you one measure that Crickets are usually active at night (nocturnal), prefer shelter in cracks and crevices and invade homes seeking moisture. An occasional cricket or two in the home usually presents no serious problem. They are seldom serious pests in the home.When i was cleaning my surplus pumps ,Crickets were found which i had controlled it by using the measure that i suggest you.
 

Vfox

Arachnobaron
Old Timer
Joined
Sep 1, 2007
Messages
530
Hey Cranker.Crickets are part of the family Gryllidae. These are insects that are partially related to grasshoppers. These have a close affinity with katydids or bush crickets.I can suggest you one measure that Crickets are usually active at night (nocturnal), prefer shelter in cracks and crevices and invade homes seeking moisture. An occasional cricket or two in the home usually presents no serious problem. They are seldom serious pests in the home.When i was cleaning my surplus pumps ,Crickets were found which i had controlled it by using the measure that i suggest you.

This is the second time you've posted this exact thing. You're not really telling us any "measure" to fix escape problems and just seemingly whoring that link. Be more specific if you actually have a real suggestion.
 

llamastick

Arachnoknight
Joined
Jan 8, 2011
Messages
155
Obvious spambot is obvious.

Anyway, you should consider roaches. I've found that crickets only live for three things: escaping, drowning themselves in condensation, and eating each other.
 
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