Help needed with Omothymus Violaceopes

Matt Hemus

Arachnopeon
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Feb 28, 2016
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5
Hi all, my fiancé took a few pics of my female violaceopes this morning before she went to work, anyhow I've noticed she has a cut/sore on her underside. Just wanted to know if she's going to be okay and whether I should do anything to help or leave her to it
TIA
 

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Vanessa

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There is very little that you can do in most cases except keep an eye on it and hopefully it will be gone with the next moult. Usually these types of issues occur where the soft tissue is and not the exoskeleton. There doesn't look like there is any fluids leaking and the spider looks like they are acting pretty normally.
Maybe someone with more experience can offer some advice. Did you take a look through the cyst thread to see if someone has encountered a similar situation?
 

Poec54

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Keep your OV warm & on the moist side, they have no drought tolerance and are have a higher rate of molting fatalities.
 

viper69

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Usually I've seen such trauma on a Ts abdomen. This is a rather unusual position, to me, for such a issue. I would find it unlikely that it's due to some external issue, such as rubbing against something etc.

You will likely have to wait this one out. Plus, given the species, there's little you could do. They aren't exactly slow and docile etc.

Usually these types of issues occur where the soft tissue is and not the exoskeleton.
What do you mean by that? Their entire body is encased in an exoskeleton o_O
 

Vanessa

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What do you mean by that? Their entire body is encased in an exoskeleton o_O
Yes, I might have worded that a bit confusingly - I should have said 'softer' not soft. The abdomen is softer than the harder exoskeleton of the cephalothorax and more delicate to ruptures and injuries. The exoskeleton of the abdomen, compared to all of the legs and cephalothorax, is almost as thin as skin. All you need to do is look at a exuvia to see that there is a difference.
 
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WeightedAbyss75

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Feb 22, 2014
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I see a lot of seriously damaged T's go into a death curl and don't move much. Your T looks amazing, with her spread out on the side of the enclosure. Like most people are going to say, you can't do much. I have no idea what type of ointment or lotion you'd cure a T with (o if that would even work), but that thing would bite you or run across your whole house before you could flip it. At least it seems to be active and is not showing signs of injury. Hopefully it will go after the next molt :D
 

Geoff Armentrout

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Jul 13, 2016
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29
Are we sure it's a sore? I only ask because it is red. I'm leaning more towards parasite or debris trapped in a water droplet (the optimist in me). I have very little experience with injuries and parasites I don't know if the inflicted areas of a T inflame red? Definitely want to see what someone else says with more experience in things like this, very interested.

Geoff
 
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