HELP My bark scorplings keep dying each year!

Catmann576

Arachnopeon
Joined
Sep 22, 2019
Messages
7
I am a backyard bark scorpion hobbyist who has found great interest in keeping this creatures as pets rather than just killing them on sight. They are so fascinating and I've learned so much but have so much more to learn. Right now I'm going into my 3rd year and have 42 scorpions in 7 tanks of various size. Of those 42 about 12 are very gravid females. In the last 2 years, I separate the mom after she births then after scorplings go through first molt and start leaving her back, I remove the mom. I then have had the babies together in one tank. But in both the past 2 years, all babies have died. In a couple occasions I have had one or 2 in separate tubs but it didn't matter - they died too. I am looking for any advice or help in having this years babies survive. I do this for my own interest and pleasure. I am amazed at how much I get out of having these guys as pets. I would appreciate any advice, tips or pointers. I also don't really know what to feed them so little. I have seen then eat cricket legs and even get their own cricket but sometimes I think those nasty crickets can do more harm to the babies. Please help! The scorpling season is about to start. Thank you!
 

Dr SkyTower

Arachnobaron
Active Member
Joined
Dec 21, 2019
Messages
312
Welcome to the board! That is so cool that you have access to so many fascinating little stingy critters! It is quite strange the babies not surviving... they are arboreal so maybe they're having trouble molting? They need to be on vertical-placed pieces of bark as gravity aids them in molting. It could be a heating issue... I'm sure adults do well at room temps but maybe babies need it a bit more warmer and with a little more humidity? Do they have access to water? It could even be a hydration/dessication issue. They are very delicate and fragile so anything might be killing them. As for feeding them, scorplings will scavenge fresh-killed cut-up pieces of insects/meal worms etc or you can try pinhead crickets/wingless fruit flies
 

Catmann576

Arachnopeon
Joined
Sep 22, 2019
Messages
7
Welcome to the board! That is so cool that you have access to so many fascinating little stingy critters! It is quite strange the babies not surviving... they are arboreal so maybe they're having trouble molting? They need to be on vertical-placed pieces of bark as gravity aids them in molting. It could be a heating issue... I'm sure adults do well at room temps but maybe babies need it a bit more warmer and with a little more humidity? Do they have access to water? It could even be a hydration/dessication issue. They are very delicate and fragile so anything might be killing them. As for feeding them, scorplings will scavenge fresh-killed cut-up pieces of insects/meal worms etc or you can try pinhead crickets/wingless fruit flies
Thank you for the pointers Dr.. It could be a molt issue. After the first molt and they come off Mother's back, I do move them to their own area and I don't remember seeing any evidence of molting after that. I keep wet sponge pieces in their water dish so to limit drowning. This year I'll make sure and put in vertical bark pieces and make sure they get enough food. Here in Az heat is not a problem I keep them in the garage. I'm looking forward to trying again. And thanks again for your response!!
 

Lethal1

Arachnopeon
Joined
Feb 1, 2014
Messages
12
Instead of sponges and a water dish, try putting them in plastic ramekins with pinholes in the lid, use eco earth for bedding and gently mist through the small holes with distilled water once or twice a week. Keep the bedding moist but not soaked. The temp should be about 78 and keep them out of sunlight, i also cut small crickets in half to feed them. Only lost 2 out of a few dozen when I bred them in the past.
 

Catmann576

Arachnopeon
Joined
Sep 22, 2019
Messages
7
Instead of sponges and a water dish, try putting them in plastic ramekins with pinholes in the lid, use eco earth for bedding and gently mist through the small holes with distilled water once or twice a week. Keep the bedding moist but not soaked. The temp should be about 78 and keep them out of sunlight, i also cut small crickets in half to feed them. Only lost 2 out of a few dozen when I bred them in the past.
So eco earth? Where can that be purchased? I used small rocks from my back yard. I didn't pay too much attention to the flooring. And you are saying to keep the scorplings in the plastic ramekins? 1 per ramekin? So keep them separated? I've heard some people keeping them in separate tubs but I have up to 100 at a time! Lol. Maybe not that many this year. I just really want at least 1 to survive - preferably many more than 1. What kind of scorplings did you raise? Thank you for all your tips!!
 

GordoOldman

Arachnopeon
Active Member
Joined
May 4, 2020
Messages
39
Good advice already offered. The scorplings need surprising amounts of water compared to adults. High humidity is required for their ability to successfully go through ecdysis.
Eco earth is one option, pet stores (or online shopping) will carry it or similiar coco coir pressed brick.
Good luck on your next litters!
 

Lethal1

Arachnopeon
Joined
Feb 1, 2014
Messages
12
So eco earth? Where can that be purchased? I used small rocks from my back yard. I didn't pay too much attention to the flooring. And you are saying to keep the scorplings in the plastic ramekins? 1 per ramekin? So keep them separated? I've heard some people keeping them in separate tubs but I have up to 100 at a time! Lol. Maybe not that many this year. I just really want at least 1 to survive - preferably many more than 1. What kind of scorplings did you raise? Thank you for all your tips!!
Eco Earth is available at most pet stores. I recommend against yard rocks as the potential for pathogens is high. Yes, separate ramekins as they will cannibalize each other (a sleeve of 100 and a sleeve of lids is like $5) I have raised C. Gracilis, A. australis, R. Junceus, L. Quinquestriatus, P Transvaalicus and T. Stigmurus. In the past.
 

radjess331

Arachnosquire
Old Timer
Joined
Oct 26, 2007
Messages
57
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You can cut cholla wood in halves to give the babies a place to shed and hide. Just gotta maintain humidity for the shed too.
 

Catmann576

Arachnopeon
Joined
Sep 22, 2019
Messages
7
Good advice already offered. The scorplings need surprising amounts of water compared to adults. High humidity is required for their ability to successfully go through ecdysis.
Eco earth is one option, pet stores (or online shopping) will carry it or similiar coco coir pressed brick.
Good luck on your next litters!
I'm guessing the babies will start end of June and with all of the great info all of the Arachnoboard members have given me, I'm going to do my best to be prepared. Off to Petsmart for eco earth to start. Another member suggested separation with ramekins so need to find those too! I'll keep you all posted on this years babies!!
 

Catmann576

Arachnopeon
Joined
Sep 22, 2019
Messages
7
Eco Earth is available at most pet stores. I recommend against yard rocks as the potential for pathogens is high. Yes, separate ramekins as they will cannibalize each other (a sleeve of 100 and a sleeve of lids is like $5) I have raised C. Gracilis, A. australis, R. Junceus, L. Quinquestriatus, P Transvaalicus and T. Stigmurus. In the past.
Ok next question where do I purchase the ramekins.? Last year I kept all of them together in a large Tupperware bin but this year I want to do everything I can to get the babies to survive. Eco earth, ramekins, more moisture and more attention to their food. So they don't go for each other. Thanks to all of you for sharing your experience and tips with me. 3rd year's the charm. People look at me oddly when I share my hobby but to me they are so fascinating and it hurts any of them die. I'll keep you posted 🦂
 

Catmann576

Arachnopeon
Joined
Sep 22, 2019
Messages
7
Eco Earth is available at most pet stores. I recommend against yard rocks as the potential for pathogens is high. Yes, separate ramekins as they will cannibalize each other (a sleeve of 100 and a sleeve of lids is like $5) I have raised C. Gracilis, A. australis, R. Junceus, L. Quinquestriatus, P Transvaalicus and T. Stigmurus. In the past.
Ok next question where do I purchase the ramekins.? Last year I kept all of them together in a large Tupperware bin but this year I want to do everything I can to get the babies to survive. Eco earth, ramekins, more moisture and more attention to their food. So they don't go for each other. Thanks to all of you for sharing your experience and tips with me. 3rd year's the charm. People look at me oddly when I share my hobby but to me they are so fascinating and it hurts any of them die. I'll keep you posted 🦂
 

Lethal1

Arachnopeon
Joined
Feb 1, 2014
Messages
12
Ok next question where do I purchase the ramekins.? Last year I kept all of them together in a large Tupperware bin but this year I want to do everything I can to get the babies to survive. Eco earth, ramekins, more moisture and more attention to their food. So they don't go for each other. Thanks to all of you for sharing your experience and tips with me. 3rd year's the charm. People look at me oddly when I share my hobby but to me they are so fascinating and it hurts any of them die. I'll keep you posted 🦂
 
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