Help Identify Tarantula

Tarantulaszzzz

Arachnopeon
Joined
Mar 1, 2017
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0
Hello Tarantula lovers,
I'm new in tarantula and i love them a lot. Recently got this Bird Eater Tarantula (t. Blondi) but i just wanna make sure if it's. Can u guys help to identify haha 17098188_10208887529445362_6069107934702359723_n.jpg
16996302_10208887493204456_1481974803046352594_n.jpg
 

Oliverhenderson

Arachnopeon
Joined
Dec 26, 2016
Messages
34
that is NOT a t blondi it looks like L parhybana you should also change the setup a fall from that high would kill it
 

Tarantulaszzzz

Arachnopeon
Joined
Mar 1, 2017
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0
that is NOT a t blondi it looks like L parhybana you should also change the setup a fall from that high would kill it
Thanks!... yup i realise its not t blondi :( it looks like L parhybana... just wanna check with you because i know T blondi need higher humidly and temperature does L parhybana too? I might need to change everything! :( 17022027_10208887613287458_5495555649351341299_n.jpg
 

EulersK

Arachnonomicon
Staff member
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Feb 22, 2013
Messages
3,301
You're not going to like what I have to say ;)

1) Yeah, definitely not a T. blondi, and likely not a Theraphosa at all. It does indeed look like an L. parahybana, but identifying a spider from a picture is often difficult. You should actually be hoping for an LP simply because they're bounds easier to keep than any Theraphosa while still keeping the impressive size. In terms of humidity, just overflow the water dish and allow the substrate to dry out completely before overflowing again. That is all.

2) The enclosure will have to go. ExoTerra's aren't great because there's no way for you to raise the substrate due to the doors. I'd try to return it if at all possible - a heavy spider taking a fall like that would be bad news. Not my most exciting video, but here is a guide on how to set up terrestrial enclosures. Remember: no heat mats! If the temperatures are staying above 65F, then you're perfectly fine.

3) Moss is pretty, but I wouldn't have it on every square inch of the enclosure. Just stick it off into the corner if you want some. The point of moss is to help hold moisture, which you just don't need with this species. It can't be comfortable for them to walk on, either.

4) Speaking of... it's a species, not a breed. Dogs have breeds because they're all the same species. A T. blondi and a L. parahybana are literally different animals and therefore different species.

5) How much did you pay for this, if I may ask? If you paid a T. blondi price, you'd better believe I'd be going down to that dealer and throwing a fit. I may not be able to tell you the actual species, but it's certainly not a T. blondi. If you paid much more than $75, then you got ripped off pretty hard.
 
Last edited:

Casey K

Arachnoknight
Joined
Nov 12, 2013
Messages
247
That definitely appears to be L. Parahybana. They reach an impressive size and grow fairly quickly. As stated, they don't need much humidity and climbing a terrarium like the one you have it in could potentially be fatal if the tarantula were to fall. EulersK pretty much gave a complete rundown of care requirements. I agree with everything he stated. I would definitely take his advice. Let us know how it turns out! :)
 

Tarantulaszzzz

Arachnopeon
Joined
Mar 1, 2017
Messages
0
image.jpg
You're not going to like what I have to say ;)

1) Yeah, definitely not a T. blondi, and likely not a Theraphosa at all. It does indeed look like an L. parahybana, but identifying a spider from a picture is often difficult. You should actually be hoping for an LP simply because they're bounds easier to keep than any Theraphosa while still keeping the impressive size. In terms of humidity, just overflow the water dish and allow the substrate to dry out completely before overflowing again. That is all.

2) The enclosure will have to go. ExoTerra's aren't great because there's no way for you to raise the substrate due to the doors. I'd try to return it if at all possible - a heavy spider taking a fall like that would be bad news. Not my most exciting video, but here is a guide on how to set up terrestrial enclosures. Remember: no heat mats! If the temperatures are staying above 65F, then you're perfectly fine.

3) Moss is pretty, but I wouldn't have it on every square inch of the enclosure. Just stick it off into the corner if you want some. The point of moss is to help hold moisture, which you just don't need with this species. It can't be comfortable for them to walk on, either.

4) Speaking of... it's a species, not a breed. Dogs have breeds because they're all the same species. A T. blondi and a L. parahybana are literally different animals and therefore different species.

5) How much did you pay for this, if I may ask? If you paid a T. blondi price, you'd better believe I'd be going down to that dealer and throwing a fit. I may not be able to tell you the actual species, but it's certainly not a T. blondi. If you paid much more than $75, then you got ripped off pretty hard.
Thank a lot for your explanations ... really appreciate and will follow it! But the dealer is actually a Friend of mine (he helping his Friend to sell) maybe he unsure about tarantula. Anyway I will still do my best to raise this beautiful creature up haha..
 

Tarantulaszzzz

Arachnopeon
Joined
Mar 1, 2017
Messages
0
That definitely appears to be L. Parahybana. They reach an impressive size and grow fairly quickly. As stated, they don't need much humidity and climbing a terrarium like the one you have it in could potentially be fatal if the tarantula were to fall. EulersK pretty much gave a complete rundown of care requirements. I agree with everything he stated. I would definitely take his advice. Let us know how it turns out! :)
Thanks for your concern I Guess I will need to find another tank for her/him
 

Tarantulaszzzz

Arachnopeon
Joined
Mar 1, 2017
Messages
0
That definitely appears to be L. Parahybana. They reach an impressive size and grow fairly quickly. As stated, they don't need much humidity and climbing a terrarium like the one you have it in could potentially be fatal if the tarantula were to fall. EulersK pretty much gave a complete rundown of care requirements. I agree with everything he stated. I would definitely take his advice. Let us know how it turns out! :)
I even diy the TOP cover to prevent any accidents. I Guess i need change the whole tank after all haha.
 

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Chris LXXIX

ArachnoGod
Active Member
Joined
Dec 25, 2014
Messages
5,825
Thanks for your concern I Guess I will need to find another tank for her/him
Buy one without considering height at all, they don't need that, 20/25 cm are more than enough, considering substrate. What's important is the floor space.
 

Jeff23

Arachnolord
Joined
Jul 27, 2016
Messages
621
It you paid extra you should seek a partial refund, but it definitely looks like a beautiful T.

You're not going to like what I have to say ;)

1) Yeah, definitely not a T. blondi, and likely not a Theraphosa at all. It does indeed look like an L. parahybana, but identifying a spider from a picture is often difficult. You should actually be hoping for an LP simply because they're bounds easier to keep than any Theraphosa while still keeping the impressive size. In terms of humidity, just overflow the water dish and allow the substrate to dry out completely before overflowing again. That is all.

2) The enclosure will have to go. ExoTerra's aren't great because there's no way for you to raise the substrate due to the doors. I'd try to return it if at all possible - a heavy spider taking a fall like that would be bad news. Not my most exciting video, but here is a guide on how to set up terrestrial enclosures. Remember: no heat mats! If the temperatures are staying above 65F, then you're perfectly fine.

3) Moss is pretty, but I wouldn't have it on every square inch of the enclosure. Just stick it off into the corner if you want some. The point of moss is to help hold moisture, which you just don't need with this species. It can't be comfortable for them to walk on, either.

4) Speaking of... it's a species, not a breed. Dogs have breeds because they're all the same species. A T. blondi and a L. parahybana are literally different animals and therefore different species.

5) How much did you pay for this, if I may ask? If you paid a T. blondi price, you'd better believe I'd be going down to that dealer and throwing a fit. I may not be able to tell you the actual species, but it's certainly not a T. blondi. If you paid much more than $75, then you got ripped off pretty hard.
I only put a little moss in each of my enclosures but don't use it to hold moisture. Is it actually uncomfortable for the T to walk on? I am wondering if I need to remove mine. I mainly use it to add a few extra web points.
 

Casey K

Arachnoknight
Joined
Nov 12, 2013
Messages
247
Thanks for your concern I Guess I will need to find another tank for her/him
It will be OK. :). There are lots of good folks here on AB that will help guide you in any way they can to ensure your T is as safe and healthy as it could possibly be. :) No question is a dumb question. You learn either way! :)
 

Andrea82

Arachnoemperor
Joined
Jan 12, 2016
Messages
3,675
It you paid extra you should seek a partial refund, but it definitely looks like a beautiful T.


I only put a little moss in each of my enclosures but don't use it to hold moisture. Is it actually uncomfortable for the T to walk on? I am wondering if I need to remove mine. I mainly use it to add a few extra web points.
I have had moss in my E.campestratus' enclosure. She is not a big webber, but she webbed it straight over, and never sits or walks on it.
I think it is maybe too soft to be comfortable for a T. For slings, a little sphagnum moss is okay, they can hide in it. But I don't use it for larger T's.
 

user 666

Arachnobaron
Joined
Jan 27, 2017
Messages
353
I have arboreal enclosures where I use moss in place of a substrate so I have something to anchor the plants in. I also like using it in juvenile enclosures so that they can tunnel underneath and through.
 

EulersK

Arachnonomicon
Staff member
Joined
Feb 22, 2013
Messages
3,301
I have arboreal enclosures where I use moss in place of a substrate so I have something to anchor the plants in. I also like using it in juvenile enclosures so that they can tunnel underneath and through.
Yes, but this is neither an arboreal nor a juvenile.

I use moss in my humid enclosures to help with the moisture, and the tarantulas universally avoid it like the plague. Not that it hurts them, I just think that they don't like walking on ground that moves beneath them.
 

cold blood

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Staff member
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Jan 19, 2014
Messages
12,370
It is indeed too tall, exoi terras are arboreal enclosures...but they can be modified. If laid on its back so the door is at the top (and damming much of the top), then you will be able to add enough sub to make it a proper terrestrial set up.

Climbing wall on the back has no place in a terrestrial enclosure.

I do like the way you have the hide set up.

Keep in mind that this species isn't in the same league size wise as the Theraposa you thought you purchased. It will get big, but it wont get to 10", or even 9"...in fact the large ones are in the 8" range and most don't reach that.
 

Ungoliant

Malleus Aranearum
Staff member
Joined
Mar 7, 2012
Messages
4,058
Thank a lot for your explanations ... really appreciate and will follow it! But the dealer is actually a Friend of mine (he helping his Friend to sell) maybe he unsure about tarantula. Anyway I will still do my best to raise this beautiful creature up haha..
Assuming it was an honest mistake, the reasonable thing for the seller to do would be to refund the difference in price between Theraphosa blondi (what he sold it as) and Lasiodora parahybana (what you actually got).

An alternative might be credit for additional tarantulas or supplies (if you want to continue doing business with him). But honest mistake or not, now you know that his labels aren't reliable, so buyer beware.
 
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