Hello Everyone New Owner (Brazilian Salmon B.E.)

stahly

Arachnopeon
Joined
Nov 13, 2010
Messages
2
We have recently acquired a Brazilian Salmon Birdeater and to be honest have never owned a T. Could Not turn this down and really want to take the best care of it. It might not be the best T to start off with but were in the situation now and need all the advice we can get. This was given to us by a mutual friend that just started down sizing her collection. This T. is 4 years old and has never bit the owner or any handlers. not sure the exact size but is pretty big in my eyes.

I joined this forum to get the most accurate information I could on this species and how to give the best care to my newly acquired T.

This is what the previous owner told us and want to be told other wise or more in depth with this species's best care plan


What knowledge if you can call it that, that was given to us......


1) Feed 1 Pinky to the T. every two weeks

2) always keep a heat lamp (white bulb or clear) on at all times...which i think im finding out is BS. we keep our house right at about 70-72 degrees.

3) they told us to set up our tank ( 30 gallon tank) with sand on the bottom, some greenery and a large shallow water dish with something for her to hide underneath and something for her to climb up on like a small log structure...

4) they explained the molting process and how delicate it can be.

They didn't tell us much of anything else



our worries...............Over heating the T., under or over feeding, and we want our tank set up to be the best it can be for the T.


is an under tank heating pad a good idea?

Do we leave the heat lamp on at all times even at night??


Is there a website with lots of information that is organized that I can read and research for the specific species? PLEASE HELP!



I know alot of you will dismiss me as I am new and probably not following protocol on how to post and what to read first its just I think some of the most basic care information is needed ASAP so we dont kill this thing over night some how



 

Chris_Skeleton

Arachnoprince
Old Timer
Joined
Jan 31, 2010
Messages
1,310
The only thing they told you that was correct was point number 4. The other three were completely off. Go here for a good care sheet:
http://sites.google.com/site/tarantuladb/care-sheets-2/lasiodora-parahybana

To the incorrect points

1. The consensus here is to NOT feed mice or any other vertebrates to tarantulas. There is a theory that the calcium will affect it in a negative way and although not proven, it is better not to risk it.

2. Yes it is BS to have a heat lamp. You can and if you do it needs to have low watts and does not need to be directly above the cage. It can cook the T. Tarantulas will be fine at room temp. If you are comfortable so are they. Your temps should be fine.

3. The only thing wrong with that is the sand. You should use either peat or coconut fiber or a mixture. And the tank should be at LEAST half full with substrate.

Make sure you read that caresheet and do more research.

Also an under the tank heater is also a bad idea, if you use a heat pad, it should be on the side.

Final note: This species is a Lasiodora parahybana

Good luck and welcome.
 
Last edited:

jt39565

Arachnoknight
Joined
Aug 28, 2010
Messages
179
Thats a really good care sheet, and your LP looks good as well. You will get many years enjoyment from it if you follow the care sheet. Enjoy!
 

brian abrams

Arachnosquire
Old Timer
Joined
Sep 12, 2009
Messages
75
Salmon Pink

Not really a beginner T, but still at least a manageable T. Much easier and hardier than let's say, a T Blondi. The true beginner T's are a piece of cake, but the intermediate T's really aren't what you would call difficult. They are fairly skittsh, but not really aggressive. I agree with the previous advice. Crickets and roaches are better feeders than pinkies (though an occasional probably doesn't do any harm). Lose the underpad heater, and overhead heater aren't necessary as long as room temps are over 75 degrees. Too high temps are a much greater danger than too cool. Good luck, and welcome to the hobby. I'm sure you are up to the challenge of an intermediate T as your first.
 

Mattyb

Arachnoking
Old Timer
Joined
Jun 28, 2004
Messages
2,321
No need for a heater. Room temp. is fine. Provide plenty of substrate (dry) and provide a hide and water dish and she will be fine. Congrats on your first T.
 

stahly

Arachnopeon
Joined
Nov 13, 2010
Messages
2
Thank you everyone! we got a thermometer to monitor the heat in the tank, so we can adjust accordingly. I will probably have lots of questions so thank you for the welcome and for the quick advice.

If our house temperature fluctuates, whats the best way to keep the tank at a very reasonable temp for the T? our house is old and sometimes feels like its 90 degrees or sometimes it feels like its 60 degrees. im just still really freaked out about keeping the tank the right temp for the T.


just dont want to cook it, or freeze it.
 

briarpatch10

Arachnosquire
Joined
Jun 21, 2010
Messages
67
if the temp drops to 60 I would and do use a heat source. I keep my kids between 72-75 year round
 

Musicwolf

Arachnoknight
Joined
Jul 2, 2010
Messages
283
The only thing I'd add is to be careful when handling the tarantula - - I notice in the picture that's it's riding on the back of someone's shoulders. If it were to get spooked and suddenly fall - - it would likely be fatal from that height. Just be cautious and realize that a fall from a foot or more could seriously injure it.

Enjoy it though - - she looks like a beauty!
 

forrestpengra

Arachnodemon
Old Timer
Joined
Oct 11, 2009
Messages
732
If you're going to heat it I would use heat tape across the back or one side (not the bottom), and put it on a thermostat. As well to keep some of the heat and moisture in you can put plastic wrap over 2/3 to 3/4 of the cage, just make sure there is some air flow.

I would be careful handling her. I have one that same size and she's evil and will chase my tongs when I am doing cage maintainence.
 

Tessa

Arachnopeon
Joined
Nov 16, 2010
Messages
6
Update on our (my and "stahly"'s) new child, Lucy: we have her tank at room temp for now. Its at an even 72 degrees. Shes been pretty active. Shes also starting to get very small bald spots on her rear so molting will be here before we know it! I definitely am concerned about changing her environment becuase she's been living in the same situation for four years now. We now have ger in a 10 gallon tank but want a larger one because she is a very active lady, and we know floor space is more important than height with this gentle giant. I realize thqt the pet store owners putting her on me at that height in the pic is VERY dangerous and I ensure everyone it will not happen again, because in all honesty, I want her to grow old with us. She seems to be adapting well. She drinks her water when she's thirsty and crawls all over whenever she can. I know to clean her water dish daily and to ensure she has clean water. My main concerns are whether it will be too stressful on her to completely change her living environment and how to keep ot humid enough for her -- and misting???-- all responses are appreciated!
 

Musicwolf

Arachnoknight
Joined
Jul 2, 2010
Messages
283
Shes been pretty active. Shes also starting to get very small bald spots on her rear so molting will be here before we know it!
Unless those bald spots are turning black, it's not actually an indication of an impending molt - - it just means that she got ticked off at something or stressed out and decided to kick some of her urticating hairs at it. The reason people think that it means an impending molt is because it "usually" takes time to create big bald spots (multiple kickings) so a molt often happens a short while later. However, it's possible for her to get bald spots two days after a molt if she's upset at something. Anyway, she may have a while yet before she molts - I say that because you said she's been pretty active. Mine shut down all activity and basically didn't move for about two weeks before it molted (though mine is still a sling).

I definitely am concerned about changing her environment becuase she's been living in the same situation for four years now. We now have ger in a 10 gallon tank but want a larger one because she is a very active lady, and we know floor space is more important than height with this gentle giant. My main concerns are whether it will be too stressful on her to completely change her living environment and how to keep ot humid enough for her -- and misting???-- all responses are appreciated!
Since she's active and probably not in pre-molt - - this is actually a great time to go ahead and upgrade her environment. It may add some stress to her life for a bit, but it shouldn't take very long for her to settle in to new digs.

As for humidity - - misting doesn't do much but provide a VERY short term spike. Just give her a nice size water dish and then increasae the humidity (if you find that you need to) by covering some of the ventilation (I'm assuming you have a screen top of some sort on the aquarium) with plastic or plastic wrap.
 

Tessa

Arachnopeon
Joined
Nov 16, 2010
Messages
6
Thanks!
Other questions:
Should I clean the cage after every feeding?
I was told by another pet store(not the one we bought her from) that they don't need to burrow and some sites say they do and others say they dont...does she?
How long do you wait before you take out an old molt? Some videos i watched, they do it right away, and some websites say to leave her alone for at least a few days.
Will she spin a web when she molts?

@musicwolf: i assumed thats what the spots were from because the pet store we got her from said she was getting ready. I cant say shes been super active, but she moves...like walks around and she always gets on her rock when dora comes on...coincidence or something more? I honestly thought she would just sit on her rock forever lol.
Every time I look in there shes in a different place.


Thanks everyone for helping us out!
I put some pics of her up on my gallery!
Her tank will be changing soon!


Oh and how can I acquire a different substrate????
 

Chris_Skeleton

Arachnoprince
Old Timer
Joined
Jan 31, 2010
Messages
1,310
Thanks!
Other questions:
Should I clean the cage after every feeding?

I was told by another pet store(not the one we bought her from) that they don't need to burrow and some sites say they do and others say they dont...does she?

How long do you wait before you take out an old molt?

Will she spin a web when she molts?

Oh and how can I acquire a different substrate????
1. You shouldn't clean the cage after feeding, just remove the bolus (uneaten part) after it's done eating.

2. Most likely it won't, this species is known to just sit out in the open. However, if you put it in a 10 gallon, you will need to fill it to at least half with substrate to reduce the risk of a fall if she climbs, and this will provide her with substrate if she wants to burrow.

3. You should wait a week or so, and then remove it. The same timeframe you wait before you feed it.

4. Yes it will most likely lay down a web, or molt mat, for it to molt on.

5. You can get more substrate at a gardening center (no fertilizers) or from the petstore. Just use peat or cocnut fiber though, or a mix of the two.
 

Tessa

Arachnopeon
Joined
Nov 16, 2010
Messages
6
Okay so just out of curiosity, if she doesn't eat her pinkie, can we feed it to a friend's snake? I don't want to like let it go outside if she doesn't eat it because I'm afraid of mice and I don't want any chances of the thing getting back in the house! They have a ball python. Probably about 2ft long, a little over..
 

Musicwolf

Arachnoknight
Joined
Jul 2, 2010
Messages
283
That size ball python would probably LOVE a pinkie . . . . then you can start feeding her crickets or roaches :D
 

KoriTamashii

Arachnobaron
Old Timer
Joined
Nov 21, 2009
Messages
420
Okay so just out of curiosity, if she doesn't eat her pinkie, can we feed it to a friend's snake? I don't want to like let it go outside if she doesn't eat it because I'm afraid of mice and I don't want any chances of the thing getting back in the house! They have a ball python. Probably about 2ft long, a little over..
Plus if it IS a pinkie, it will just die if you leave it outside.

Feed to snake! :D
 

Chris_Skeleton

Arachnoprince
Old Timer
Joined
Jan 31, 2010
Messages
1,310
Okay so just out of curiosity, if she doesn't eat her pinkie, can we feed it to a friend's snake? I don't want to like let it go outside if she doesn't eat it because I'm afraid of mice and I don't want any chances of the thing getting back in the house! They have a ball python. Probably about 2ft long, a little over..
Tarantulas do not need mice or any other vertebrate for that matter, it is frowned upon here. There is a chance it could cause complications for your T when it molts. It hasn't been proven, but why risk it? Just go ahead and give all the ones you have to your friend for their snake and stick to crickets and roaches for your T. Two or three large crickets or roaches a week will be fine for it. There is no need to feed it a mouse.
 

jebbewocky

Arachnoangel
Old Timer
Joined
Oct 1, 2009
Messages
910
Some good reference materials:
First

Reference Guide

Some other suggestions:
1.) For an LP that size, I wouldn't bother with crickets or mealworms. Bigger prey items are better, like B.dubia, or B.discoidalis. Those are both roach species. I can suggest a few good vendors if you like. If you aren't comfortable with roaches, then stick with crickets.
2.) The 30 gallon is fine, provided it has sufficient substrate so as not to constitute a falling hazard. I wouldn't use the 10 personally--as it grows that will (IMO) be rather cramped. A 20 would be ideal, but 30 is just fine.
I'd use the 10 gallon to keep feeders in.
3.) Burrowing: It may, it may not. Depends on what it wants to do. Either way, you'll need to provide enough dirt for it to be safe from falls, which will be enough to burrow in. If it wants to, it will, if not, it won't. Just be sure to provide it a big enough hide.
4.) IMO, this is the perfect beginner species. Beginners tend to provide too large of a tank, and overfeed. Both are harder to do with an LP. Further, LP are tempermental enough to be interesting, but not defensive or quick enough to be intimidating.

Welcome to the boards, and welcome to the hobby.
 
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