Have some questions about pink toes, friends T is not looking so great.

Nioctin

Arachnopeon
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Sep 23, 2020
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Is it normal for pink toe T’s to stay close to the ground? I know they are Aboreal Species, I’ve already figured out a few things that have been wrong just from talking to her about it.It’s a case of her not finding legitimate source of informationDo to Inexperienced handler’s Making videos on YouTube and social media sites, The good news she is eating does it when fed. So off the bat I noticed that the substrate was dry I told her to start dampening the soil on one side of the enclosure opposite of the spider and to dampen it enough so it keeps the bottom layer well and moist and stop using her misting bottle. Unfortunately I’m not as experienced as most, And this is all I can really identify with the limited information, She is also Dipping her crickets in calcium powder is that a thing? I’ve never heard of this, As long as your feeders have a good diet source you don’t need to do this correct?If you guys can think of anything or have any other comments or advice please let me know pictures enclosed below, thank you.

8E014CFB-20C0-4E3F-A9C9-426F5178E69F.jpeg 07A4029E-566F-45F8-8E94-532F8B0798C9.jpeg 9BCE6969-1BC4-4FAC-8B90-55A26E95798B.jpeg


Here is my pink toe enclosure and she’s seems vary happy and healthy, I keep her at a good humidity level and feed her twice a month. she normally doesn’t eat a lot. any comments and and Advice would be most appreciated

C1856B06-7035-44C7-B02A-2872E0F4C8FB.jpeg
 
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Buffalo Ts

Arachnoknight
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Yes it's an arboreal species.

With your friend enclosure, it can't make any webs up top, there aren't any anchor points. Substrate can remain dry with a pink toe. You do however, need to provide a full water dish.

I've attached an image of one of my front opening enclosures. You'll get the idea. Your friend will want to provide more anchor points.

Your friend shouldn't be doing anything to the feeders. Altering the feeders is not necessary with a tarantula, and it may harm the tarantula.

Is there any ventilation with your friend enclosure?

Your enclosure is lacking some webbing points up top, but it looks like your tarantula was still able to build a home. In the future, you'll want to provide a more "functional" environment.
 

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RoachCoach

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I would assume a bit more foliage for cover or climbing. Tell them to invest in a hygrometer if they have any animal that requires anything other than a bone dry enclosure.
Edit: I agree with @Buffalo Ts above comment. More stuff. I just own semi arboreal and fossorial species but the semis will web the crap out of anything that can reach.
 

DomGom TheFather

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Don't fret with humidity. Foliage and anchor points up top. Plenty of ventilation. Don't dust feeders.
Your friend's enclosure is a bit large and I can't tell what's going on up top with ventilation. Steer clear of screen. Cross ventilation is ideal. That pinecone and some of the decor is suspect. I would recommend a rehouse.
There are a ton of threads on here that cover this species and its requirements.
If you're having trouble using the search function, Google it and add Arachnoboards.
 

Nioctin

Arachnopeon
Joined
Sep 23, 2020
Messages
29
Yes it's an arboreal species.

With your friend enclosure, it can't make any webs up top, there aren't any anchor points. Substrate can remain dry with a pink toe. You do however, need to provide a full water dish.

I've attached an image of one of my front opening enclosures. You'll get the idea. Your friend will want to provide more anchor points.

Your friend shouldn't be doing anything to the feeders. Altering the feeders is not necessary with a tarantula, and it may harm the tarantula.

Is there any ventilation with your friend enclosure?

Your enclosure is lacking some webbing points up top, but it looks like your tarantula was still able to build a home. In the future, you'll want to provide a more "functional" environment.
Thank you for the advice I’ll be sure to put more Anchor points plants and other things inside her enclosure for now I’ve just left her alone because she’s webbed up the lid and opening it would cause me to destroy half of it so I’ve been giving her time to web up other places Before I do so LOL I feeder crickets Through the holesAnd they are located everywhere along the sides and top, I think the only ventilation area is up at the top and right where the door opens to my friends enclosure. I didn’t see a water dish either in her enclosure but she said there is one.I did tell her to stop Dipping her crickets and the calcium powder.
 

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Malum Argenteum

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not finding legitimate source of information

That enclosure looks too big, too -- that's a 12 x 12 x 18, right? How large is the spider?
 

Nioctin

Arachnopeon
Joined
Sep 23, 2020
Messages
29
Don't fret with humidity. Foliage and anchor points up top. Plenty of ventilation. Don't dust feeders.
Your friend's enclosure is a bit large and I can't tell what's going on up top with ventilation. Steer clear of screen. Cross ventilation is ideal. That pinecone and some of the decor is suspect. I would recommend a rehouse.
There are a ton of threads on here that cover this species and its requirements.
If you're having trouble using the search function, Google it and add Arachnoboards.
I’m not having trouble using the search engine, I was just also looking Chat about it And have a bit of conversation. Sorry to impose.


That enclosure looks too big, too -- that's a 12 x 12 x 18, right? How large is the spider?
She Looks about 4” I haven’t seen the enclosure or the spider in person yet
 

DomGom TheFather

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I’m not having trouble using the search engine, I was just also looking Chat about it And have a bit of conversation. Sorry to impose.
No imposition.
I get it. Talking about spiders is fun.🙂
I was just directing you to information.
 

viper69

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Is it normal for pink toe T’s to stay close to the ground? I know they are Aboreal Species, I’ve already figured out a few things that have been wrong just from talking to her about it.It’s a case of her not finding legitimate source of informationDo to Inexperienced handler’s Making videos on YouTube and social media sites, The good news she is eating does it when fed. So off the bat I noticed that the substrate was dry I told her to start dampening the soil on one side of the enclosure opposite of the spider and to dampen it enough so it keeps the bottom layer well and moist and stop using her misting bottle. Unfortunately I’m not as experienced as most, And this is all I can really identify with the limited information, She is also Dipping her crickets in calcium powder is that a thing? I’ve never heard of this, As long as your feeders have a good diet source you don’t need to do this correct?If you guys can think of anything or have any other comments or advice please let me know pictures enclosed below, thank you.

View attachment 373317 View attachment 373318 View attachment 373319


Here is my pink toe enclosure and she’s seems vary happy and healthy, I keep her at a good humidity level and feed her twice a month. she normally doesn’t eat a lot. any comments and and Advice would be most appreciated

View attachment 373320
Who the HELL dusts their crickets with Ca?????????

That person needs to do damn RESEARCH!

I sense another DEAD AVIC thread coming

Read my link below
 

RoachCoach

Arachnoknight
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Who the HELL dusts their crickets with Ca?????????

That person needs to do damn RESEARCH!

I sense another DEAD AVIC thread coming

Read my link below
Dusting witch calcium, huh?

holy crap I skimmed right over that. They must be a reptile or amphibian owner. Don't supplement T diet with anything other than a variety of insects that are clean. Dusting is for reptiles and amphibians that can convert the calcium with UVB light.
 

Malum Argenteum

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Dusting is for reptiles and amphibians that can convert the calcium with UVB light.
Tangential point, but the reason herps' food is dusted is because many species tend not to get a wide range of necessary vitamins and minerals from commercial insect (and other foods) diets. Not all herps need to synthesize D3 with UVB because their (usually vertebrate) prey contains it, and all can be provided with dietary D3 in captivity.
 
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viper69

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Here’s a nice D review
 

Malum Argenteum

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That review neglects to mention the role of dietary D3.

Here's an abstract of a peer reviewed study that considers the role of dietary D3 in a basking species:

Most (99%+) rodent feeding snakes are kept in captivity without UVB provision, and the incidence of hypocalcimia in those species is virtually nil, since whole rodent prey supplies sufficient D3 (which the rodent also gets from dietary sources).

I guess the only reason I pointed this out in the first place is that if some keepers incorrectly assume that Ts need calcium (etc.) supplements, they might come to think that Ts need UVB, and that could lead to bad outcomes.
 

Smotzer

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Oh jeez, I feel bad for that Avicularia in the hands of the original owner, not sure she should even be keeping based off this (you seem to have more of a right to keep it).. im surprised its not dead yet, that has to be one of the worst avic enclosures. "heres a three sticks, and a terrestrial hide". - Its a shame some people do so little research into keeping an animal.
 

viper69

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That review neglects to mention the role of dietary D3.

Here's an abstract of a peer reviewed study that considers the role of dietary D3 in a basking species:

Most (99%+) rodent feeding snakes are kept in captivity without UVB provision, and the incidence of hypocalcimia in those species is virtually nil, since whole rodent prey supplies sufficient D3 (which the rodent also gets from dietary sources).

I guess the only reason I pointed this out in the first place is that if some keepers incorrectly assume that Ts need calcium (etc.) supplements, they might come to think that Ts need UVB, and that could lead to bad outcomes.
Correct it does not. I didn't feel like spending more time on vit D metabolism in reptiles for a T thread. I assumed people could look that up on PubMed or elsewhere if they were really interested, like I do.
 
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