Has anyone ever seen this?

AnimalMother

Arachnopeon
Joined
Sep 29, 2005
Messages
28
I dont have a photo so I cant show you, but from time to time I have noticed this happening to some of my tarantulas. It does not happen often, maybe it happens once a year to one of them, but I have noticed it at least 2 other times before.

I came home to see my Redknee climbing on the walls, and it was bleeding out of its fangs. It wasnt much, but it was like a glob of blood that was roughly the same size as its fangs. Eventually it stopped, but it scared me, like it always does.

I have seen this on 2 other Tarantulas of mine over a span of 4 years. Each Time it freaked me out, I thought they might die, but each time they pulled through. The bleeding stopped, and My redknee looks fine to me. I am just wondering, has anyone seen this before, is this natural? Sorry I have no picture. thanks for your help my fellow crazies
 

Masurai

Arachnobaron
Old Timer
Joined
Apr 21, 2007
Messages
311
I dont have a photo so I cant show you, but from time to time I have noticed this happening to some of my tarantulas. It does not happen often, maybe it happens once a year to one of them, but I have noticed it at least 2 other times before.

I came home to see my Redknee climbing on the walls, and it was bleeding out of its fangs. It wasnt much, but it was like a glob of blood that was roughly the same size as its fangs. Eventually it stopped, but it scared me, like it always does.

I have seen this on 2 other Tarantulas of mine over a span of 4 years. Each Time it freaked me out, I thought they might die, but each time they pulled through. The bleeding stopped, and My redknee looks fine to me. I am just wondering, has anyone seen this before, is this natural? Sorry I have no picture. thanks for your help my fellow crazies
Are you sure it wasn't just venom
 

Talkenlate04

ArachnoGod
Old Timer
Joined
Feb 13, 2006
Messages
8,662
To the best of my knowledge T's don’t ever just sit there and pump out venom. They will however produce clear drops of fluid, that seem to be residual from eating and or grooming. I have seen it more after a good grooming. I have actually seen them drip out 3-4 full big drops before continuing on their way like nothing ever happened.
I don't think you have anything to worry about though.
 

cacoseraph

ArachnoGod
Old Timer
Joined
Jan 5, 2005
Messages
8,328
could you elaborate on the bleeding? how much fluid are we talking here? could you characterize the fluid?
 

verry_sweet

Arachnobaron
Old Timer
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Jul 22, 2006
Messages
569
I have also seen it a number of time. No clue as to why they do it but here is a pic of my baby G. aureostriata doing it. Sorry about the pic quality it was taken thru a not so clear Tupperware container.



Steph
 

Sheazy

Arachnoknight
Old Timer
Joined
Apr 19, 2007
Messages
155
There is a paragraph in the Tarantula keepers guide about T's having to regulate and excrete salts from their bodies (usually after meals), this leaves a blob, like people mention right under the fangs and usually dries to leave a white chalky powder or residue. From what I have read and heard, this is perfectly normal. I have pics of mine doing it here:

http://www.arachnoboards.com/ab/showthread.php?t=93671&page=2

I will find the paragraph in the TKG and post it when I get off work for ya. I know you said you thought it was blood, so did what your talking about have a color to it, or was it clear?
 

Bobert

Arachnopeon
Joined
Jun 5, 2007
Messages
11
There is a paragraph in the Tarantula keepers guide about T's having to regulate and excrete salts from their bodies (usually after meals), this leaves a blob, like people mention right under the fangs and usually dries to leave a white chalky powder or residue. From what I have read and heard, this is perfectly normal. I have pics of mine doing it here:

http://www.arachnoboards.com/ab/showthread.php?t=93671&page=2

I will find the paragraph in the TKG and post it when I get off work for ya. I know you said you thought it was blood, so did what your talking about have a color to it, or was it clear?
That would make sense, I witnessed my B Auratum doing that while attached to the viv wall shortly after a meal... Was curious too!
 

Parahybana3590

Arachnoknight
Old Timer
Joined
Jan 23, 2006
Messages
162
A few of my t's have done it from time to time (that I've seen), it's nothing to worry about.
 

sammyp

Arachnosquire
Old Timer
Joined
Apr 17, 2006
Messages
146
I have also seen it a number of time. No clue as to why they do it but here is a pic of my baby G. aureostriata doing it. Sorry about the pic quality it was taken thru a not so clear Tupperware container.



Steph
They're just so darn cute when they get to that 'bubble-blowing' stage...:D
 

M.F.Bagaturov

Arachnoprince
Old Timer
Joined
Jun 20, 2004
Messages
1,005
Hello!
I think it is enough said in other threads thaht it is just a water surplus which tarantula "drools" out from it's mouth.
 

JMoran1097

Arachnoangel
Old Timer
Joined
May 14, 2007
Messages
924
exactly. i highly doubt it's any sort of bodily fluid. to my best judgment, it's normally excess water.
 

Sheazy

Arachnoknight
Old Timer
Joined
Apr 19, 2007
Messages
155
Here you go...

Alright, I forgot yesterday since I was playing with my new slings, but here it is. I will just start where I think it is relevant.

Again, this is taken directly from the Tarantula Keeper's Guide as written by Stanley and Marguerite Schultz. If this in any way violates the rules please let me know and I will delete the following excerpt.

"Most arthropods posses coxal glands that are direct homologues of more primitive excretory organs called nephridia, found in less advanced invertebrates. Tarantula's are no exception, they have two pairs located in the prosoma and emptying through pores along the posterior (rear) sides of the bases of the animals' first and third coxae, whence the name. For many years arachnologists have fretted about their purpose. Many held the opinion that they had no purpose, being vestiges of the more promitive nephridia that were no longer required. Other experts are not so certain. (Nephridia are discussed again in page 46.)

Recently, however, Butt and Taylor (1991) have determined that coxal glands do have a function. It seems that they secrete a salt solution that passes along the fold in the pleural membranes between coxae and the sternum, toward the mouth. This fluid seems to have at least two purposes. First, it serves to maintain the fluidity of the food solution that the tarantula must drink, much like our saliva. Second, it may help to maintain the tarantula's salt balance by loading extra salt into the discarded food pellet. In a weird sort of way, the spider salivates through its armpits!

The final, well blended pellet that remains after a meal is composed largely of the preys indigestible body parts (e.g., it's exoskeleton), the last few products of digestion that the tarantula couldn't extract, and excess salts. In the hobby these are sometimes termed the tarantula's spit ball, the professional arachnologist refers to it as the food bolus."



Hope that helps with anyone who is wondering. :D

Shawn
 

AnimalMother

Arachnopeon
Joined
Sep 29, 2005
Messages
28
Those pictures you both posted were exactly what I have seen. Hes doing fine, and I am now not worried, thank you all for your responses.
 

Sheazy

Arachnoknight
Old Timer
Joined
Apr 19, 2007
Messages
155
Glad it helped. I was worried too when I first saw that.
 
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