Has anyone done well with Glomeris?

PillipedeBreeder

Arachnopeon
Joined
Sep 11, 2021
Messages
21
Yes, they actually need very well rotted leaf humus or the dirt that live moss creates in their diet right?
Hello,
pustulata don’t.
They are very easy, thriving on normal, decaying leaves, mixed with a lot of calcium, with some moss, lichens and wood (not white rot).
They even have been observed feeding on supplemental foods. Basically they are ridiculously easy, the easiest pillipedes can get.

I actually don’t know a single pillipede which needs the soil mosses create, except maybe Glomeris balcanica, which apparently need moss to breed.
-That being said, it is always good to offer moss!

Best Regards,
PillipedeBreeder
 
Last edited:

Elytra and Antenna

Arachnoking
Arachnosupporter +
Joined
Sep 12, 2002
Messages
2,340
Hello,
pustulata don’t.
They are very easy, thriving on normal, decaying leaves, mixed with a lot of calcium, with some moss, lichens and wood (not white rot).
They even have been observed feeding on supplemental foods. Basically they are ridiculously easy, the easiest pillipedes can get.

I actually don’t know a single pillipede which needs the soil mosses create, except maybe Glomeris balcanica, which apparently need moss to breed.
-That being said, it is always good to offer moss!

Best Regards,
PillipedeBreeder
How many consecutive generations without WC have you had so far?
 

PillipedeBreeder

Arachnopeon
Joined
Sep 11, 2021
Messages
21
Good afternoon,
unfortunately that’s not my own experience, but more or less general consens in european Glomeris breedings.
How many consecutive generations without WC have you had so far?
I will recieve a group of 20 WC pustulata this fall, if there’s interest in that, I can document that (and my other Glomerid breedings) in a thread here.

I have read now that the american breeders struggle a bit with the slow reproduction, in pustulata, I don’t know if it’s a common practice in the USA, but do you hibernate them?
Other Glomerida species require hibernations to breed, maybe it’s possible, that hibernation is not needed for a little bit of reproduction, but for big amounts of eggs to be laid.
That’s just speculation for pillipedes, but atleast an occurrence in some Scarabaeidae.

Best Regards,
PillipedeBreeder
 

Lordosteous

Arachnopeon
Joined
Nov 25, 2020
Messages
13
Really great thread so far, I currently have a small group of g. pustulata courtesy of Orrin. They're doing well for me on rotting leaves and hardwood with extra calcium and some live moss, but no babies yet. I'd love to see your experience documented!
 

Elytra and Antenna

Arachnoking
Arachnosupporter +
Joined
Sep 12, 2002
Messages
2,340
Good afternoon,
unfortunately that’s not my own experience, but more or less general consens in european Glomeris breedings.

I will recieve a group of 20 WC pustulata this fall, if there’s interest in that, I can document that (and my other Glomerid breedings) in a thread here.

I have read now that the american breeders struggle a bit with the slow reproduction, in pustulata, I don’t know if it’s a common practice in the USA, but do you hibernate them?
Other Glomerida species require hibernations to breed, maybe it’s possible, that hibernation is not needed for a little bit of reproduction, but for big amounts of eggs to be laid.
That’s just speculation for pillipedes, but atleast an occurrence in some Scarabaeidae.

Best Regards,
PillipedeBreeder
The first time they had tons of babies and seemed to be so easy but then over 12-18 months they slowly withered away. A lot of things seem so easy to breed for people with consistent wild sources because getting babies from WC females is always easy.
 

Madnesssr

Arachnoknight
Joined
Dec 2, 2019
Messages
238
If someone offers some rare inverts for trade maybe....
If you head that way anytime soon, collect a few for me please, please, please. I wouldn't mind giving them another try now that I have a little more experience with Glomeris.
 
Top