Hapolopus sp Columbia large/small

AmberDawnDays

Arachnoknight
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Nov 24, 2016
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I never knew until today that there was a Hapolopus sp Columbia large & small. I was only aware of the dwarf species that some refer to as "pumpkin patch," but I guess this common name is used for both large & small? I have no clue. I hate common names. They confuse me. Anyways, today at an expo I saw Hapolopus sp Columbia spiderlings for sale under the name pumpkin patch. No scientific name was listed and nothing about large or small. The Hapolopus sp. Columbia has been on my want list so I picked 2 of them up. I kept browsing and came across a person who asked me if my pumpkin patch spiderlings were the large or small ones and I had no clue. So I went back and asked the guy I bought them from and he said they were the large version, so not the ones I wanted. Oh well.

So I'm wondering what is the difference between the two other than size?
 

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Tanner Dzula

Arachnoknight
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Feb 29, 2016
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usually, people refer to the Large as Pumpkin patch, and the small as Munpkin patch. but even then, not everybody does. unfortunately this is the trouble with relying on the Common names.

i had a similar issue with a Local shop who had three completely different looking Slings labeled as "african Baboon - Fast" and nothing else, not even half a common name to go with it. yet all three were 3 different prices, and because their "spider guy" was not in that day, the guy couldn't give me much more info. but he did suggest that they were "easy" to care for normally.

i haven't had a (small) myself, but we do have a Large and they are pretty great T's. ours is pretty skittish and can be somewhat fast at times, but other wise pretty docile.
they are great eaters and Amazing webbers. ill post a pick of ours right before the most recent rehousing this week, she was in a normal KK and literally filled that thing with webbing very quickly.
 

Tanner Dzula

Arachnoknight
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Feb 29, 2016
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heres mine, the last time we saw her before holeing her self up before this last molt:
Screen Shot 2017-05-13 at 1.14.44 PM.png

here she is standing in place of the Silk plant that USED to be there, before you took it, and most of the substrate that was there, and proptly bulldozed it all over into her water bowl and then made her hide there. Great little builders and awesome webbers.
and she's only about 3" in this pic.
 

nicodimus22

Arachnomancer
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he said they were the large version, so not the ones I wanted. Oh well.
AFAIK, it's not much of a difference in size...the small maxes out around 2 inches and the large at 3-3.5 inches. Both pretty small Ts relative to others in the hobby.
 

viper69

ArachnoGod
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Dec 8, 2006
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11,508
I never knew until today that there was a Hapolopus sp Columbia large & small. I was only aware of the dwarf species that some refer to as "pumpkin patch," but I guess this common name is used for both large & small? I have no clue. I hate common names. They confuse me. Anyways, today at an expo I saw Hapolopus sp Columbia spiderlings for sale under the name pumpkin patch. No scientific name was listed and nothing about large or small. The Hapolopus sp. Columbia has been on my want list so I picked 2 of them up. I kept browsing and came across a person who asked me if my pumpkin patch spiderlings were the large or small ones and I had no clue. So I went back and asked the guy I bought them from and he said they were the large version, so not the ones I wanted. Oh well.

So I'm wondering what is the difference between the two other than size?
There is also a third one, people call the Lemon Patch. It's the smallest if I recall, scientific name Hapalopus triseriatus.

The other 2 aren't scientifically characterized yet to the best of my knowledge.

I've owned both species and they are both sweet. No difference between the two other than size IME. Also, you can tell them apart from the dorsal pattern on the abdomen. Large has the anterior orange patches connected by the thin orange line down the middle, and Small, they are not connected.

Here's my AF Large, RIP
 

viper69

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AmberDawnDays

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There is really good ventral pics of all 4 species in the link below, post 75.
Hapalopus sp "Columbia" lg or Grosa (pumpkin patch), Hapalopus sp "Columbia" small or Klein (munchkin patch), Hapalopus triseriatus (lemon patch) both lowland and highland versions.
http://arachnoboards.com/threads/least-scary-vs-most-scary.261388/page-4
Thanks for the link and all the great info. I never knew there were 2 variations and there are 3.

@viper69 Thanks for all the great info. So is the large variation still considered a dwarf species?
 

AmberDawnDays

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Nov 24, 2016
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The two little bitty Hapolopus sp. Columbia large slings have both been bulldozing their substrate in their teeny little condiment cup enclosures. It's quite adorable.
 

viper69

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Thanks for the link and all the great info. I never knew there were 2 variations and there are 3.

@viper69 Thanks for all the great info. So is the large variation still considered a dwarf species?

Dwarf is really a relative term, like sling and juvi.

Compared to other normal sized Ts it is often referred to as a dwarf, but when you throw in some of the smaller species, some people call the large form a semi-dwarf. It's subjective.
 

Jason B

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Sep 10, 2016
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I really love my large sling. He recently molted and I currently don't have a feeder of the right size and I'm not a fan of crickets so i was feeding him half of a meal work cut in half. After the molt I was hoping I could get him on to pre-killed dubia nymphs but he didn't he wasn't going for them so I switched back to a meal worm. When I dropped it into his condiment cup it stuck to the side and I was like i've seen him drag them to his burrow so he should be able to move it if he wants to. Woke up the next morning to see him just eating it where it landed.
 
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