Haplopelma lividum molting inside the burrow

MasamuneX7

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Yesterday, I woke up to find my H. lividum on her back inside of her burrow. Since she constructed her burrow up against the glass, I can somewhat see her, but it's just an outline as her webs obscure the view. I left for a couple hours and came back and it appeared that she had successfully molted, with the shed skin towards the back of the burrow. I couldn't see her clearly to see the condition she was in, but noticed some slight movement from what appeared to be her fangs. This morning, I went to go check up on her, and from what I can make out, it seems that she's on her back again, and not moving.

A picture really doesn't help since she's barely visible. I can make out the round abdomen, but there don't seem to be any legs on the ground. They appear to be pointed upwards, which tells me she's on her back again.

Is it possible that she died after a disastrous molt?
 

P. Novak

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Yea it could be possible, but she could still be resting. Just in case I wouldnt bother her and just leave her be. If it starts to smell or decompose you know shes dead. I hope she did pull through!
 

Talkenlate04

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I don't think she died, unless those legs you see are curled under her. Are you sure you saw her molt? There was really a shed skin that you could see?
Heck there are are a lot of things that could be happening, but with a burrowing species like that it's better if you just leave her alone. If in a few days she still is like that then maybe you would then dig her up and see what was going on, but only when you were 100% sure something wrong was going on.
 

Cirith Ungol

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When you see the legs curl up you know it's over. But maybe it's just the old exo that has fallen onto its backside?
 

MasamuneX7

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Yea it could be possible, but she could still be resting. Just in case I wouldnt bother her and just leave her be. If it starts to smell or decompose you know shes dead. I hope she did pull through!
How long should I wait? She was finished molting around 22 hours ago, and I could see her moving around last night.
 

Talkenlate04

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How long should I wait? She was finished molting around 22 hours ago, and I could see her moving around last night.
Your going to have to be patient and just wait, days a week maybe more. Unless she does not move from that position that you see her in then maybe in a few days you can dig her up and see whats going on, but doing that now while she is fresh from a molt could be enough stress to kill her no matter what condition she is in.
 

Moltar

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That's crazy cuz my H lividum is molting at this very moment. She's only been in this enclosure for about 40 days so the burrow is only 2-3 inches deep under the driftwood hide. She's in her shallow burrow as well rather then out in the obviously more spacious floor of the tank. I found my girl on her back at 9:00am today and she's still upside down twitching her legs but hasn't yet even popped the carapace. So have hope, maybe they just take a while.

I hope your cobalt makes it through healthy. What's weird is my E. murinus just molted yesterday. Why do they always do this in groups?
 

MasamuneX7

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I don't think she died, unless those legs you see are curled under her. Are you sure you saw her molt? There was really a shed skin that you could see?
Heck there are are a lot of things that could be happening, but with a burrowing species like that it's better if you just leave her alone. If in a few days she still is like that then maybe you would then dig her up and see what was going on, but only when you were 100% sure something wrong was going on.
Yeah, I'm sure she molted. I can see it pressed up against the glass from the viewing hole and another dark shape further away that is her. I can't make out anything but an abdomen and stumps where the legs should be, but they could be pointing upwards. It's very hard to see.

I hope your cobalt makes it through healthy. What's weird is my E. murinus just molted yesterday. Why do they always do this in groups?
Funny, because my H. lividum lives right next door to my E. murinus, separated by a divider in the same tank.

Hmm. It seems like she moved a few millimeters, because she's not in the exact same position she was just a few minutes ago.
 
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Moltar

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Funny, because my H. lividum lives right next door to my E. murinus, separated by a divider in the same tank.

Hmm. It seems like she moved a few millimeters, because she's not in the exact same position she was just a few minutes ago.
Krazy. My E murinus and H lividum are neighbors also. Not sharing a split tank but right next to each other in seperate tupperware style enclosures. Both are recently acquired and not fully settled in yet. They're kept under almost the same conditions and are both just hitting adulthood. I think they'll be best of friends. Maybe i should move them in together?

Movement is good. Can you make out if the old exo is seperate from the body? Is it possible she's already molted completely and you just can't see the exuvium? Often after a molt t's will hang out in weird positions for whatever reason.
 

MasamuneX7

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It seems that she has pulled through. I accidentally bumped into the tank and saw her shuffling around down there. I can see the exuvium up against the glass quite clearly. Now I need to make sure she's got all her legs, and with her almost never coming out of her burrow, it's going to be tough to see her.
 

dianedfisher

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She'll be out for dinner in a week or so. Once you feed her, you probably won't see her again for a while. LOL Now I know why the obligate burrowers are called pet holes (and so do you). I only have three-a H. longipes, a C.fimbriatus and a E. pachypus and I am always happy when I get to see them. :)
 
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