Handling?

Vanessa

Grammostola Groupie
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i had been watching youtube videos and reading articles until i found this website. i've found google searches to be very unhelpful.
i have been curious about my setup as i haven't changed that much since i bought him. every site i got to says to set it up differently so i'm not sure what to change or if it's fine. i'm also a bit nervous to move stuff around because he has become very accustomed to it and has built his home already. thoughts? ideas? advice? View attachment 362368
That is not an appropriate setup for this animal at all.

1. Exo Terra front opening enclosures are not appropriate for any terrestrial species. The do not allow for enough substrate to be put in them and they are an extreme fall risk.
2. Aphonopelma seemanni is an obligate burrower (fossorial) who requires several inches deep substrate that is kept moist on the bottom layers.

Handling is the last thing you should be prioritizing at the moment when your animal is living in a deathtrap. You need to basically scrap the entire setup that you have this animal in and start from scratch. You need a deep enclosure that allows for several inches of substrate for this animal to burrow in. You need to make a starter burrow using that hide and place it at an angle in the substrate to help them out and encourage them to burrow underneath. You need a fairly large water dish and you need to pour water into the corners to make the bottom layers of substrate damp while keeping the surface dry and packed down.
 

notactuallyjesus

Arachnopeon
Joined
Oct 8, 2020
Messages
6
That is not an appropriate setup for this animal at all.

1. Exo Terra front opening enclosures are not appropriate for any terrestrial species. The do not allow for enough substrate to be put in them and they are an extreme fall risk.
2. Aphonopelma seemanni is an obligate burrower (fossorial) who requires several inches deep substrate that is kept moist on the bottom layers.

Handling is the last thing you should be prioritizing at the moment when your animal is living in a deathtrap. You need to basically scrap the entire setup that you have this animal in and start from scratch. You need a deep enclosure that allows for several inches of substrate for this animal to burrow in. You need to make a starter burrow using that hide and place it at an angle in the substrate to help them out and encourage them to burrow underneath. You need a fairly large water dish and you need to pour water into the corners to make the bottom layers of substrate damp while keeping the surface dry and packed down.
thank you so much for the advice!!
 

Craig73

Arachnoknight
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Jun 2, 2016
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What @Vanessa said. You can start by checking out husbandry from Tom Moran, he’s highly regarded. It’ll get you a little more familiar with this species. Also the search feature here you can look for husbandry info. Lots of people keep this T, so I’m sure more people will chime in. The important part is figure out the enclosure so it’s not continually being modified as you discover new info....don’t piece mill a fix if it’s not in immediate danger would be my advice.

Edit: fixed link
 

Rigor Mortis

Arachnobaron
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OP it gives me so much hope that you’re taking everyone’s advice to heart. You seem like you really do care about your spider and want to do the best for him. Thank you for that.
 

notactuallyjesus

Arachnopeon
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Oct 8, 2020
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6
OP it gives me so much hope that you’re taking everyone’s advice to heart. You seem like you really do care about your spider and want to do the best for him. Thank you for that.
of course! love the name btw hahaha

What @Vanessa said. You can start by checking out husbandry from Tom Moran, he’s highly regarded. It’ll get you a little more familiar with this species. Also the search feature here you can look for husbandry info. Lots of people keep this T, so I’m sure more people will chime in. The important part is figure out the enclosure so it’s not continually being modified as you discover new info....don’t piece mill a fix if it’s not in immediate danger would be my advice.

Edit: fixed link
this video is SUPER helpful, thanks so much!
 

Vanessa

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Aphonopelma seemanni is a bit of an oddball in the hobby. Most times, people are able to keep entire genera in basically the same fashion, because they have the same needs. This applies to almost all beginner friendly genera, including Brachypelma, Grammostola, Euathlus, Avicularia, and many others.
Being that the Aphonopelma species indigenous to the United States are found far more in the North American hobby, people often believe that all Aphonopelma species have the same requirements. However, Aphonopelma seemanni is different, because they come from a far more tropical environment. Not only are their basic needs far different to those of the more arid Aphonopelma, but their temperament is far different as well. This animal comes with a far more skittish and defensive nature than the other Aphonopelma common to the hobby, like chalcodes, hentzi, and anax.
 

Matt Man

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If there was a list of Aphonopelma and Handling - A seemanni would be probably at the bottom. I don't judge handlers, rarely handle mine and encourage folks not to for all the aforementioned reasons. They are close to the oddest / crankiest of the genus ( I would rate Anax probably crankier). So I would advise as others do here, to treat like a fish (with less upkeep). Lastly I would concur on the habitat comments. Terrestrial / Fossorial Ts need deeper dirt and more floor space, so a habitat with a bigger footprint and lower ceiling will work better. Save that case for your first arboreal.
 

mellow

Arachnobaron
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Apr 16, 2020
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I don't recommend handling, but if you decide to handle your tarantula, handle it really close to the ground, carpet is the best surface to handle them over. 😃
 

zeeman

Arachnosquire
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Messages
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I feel like this conversation is like telling a young adult sex is bad when they come to you for advice on how to safely do it. In similar circumstances before mods delete the comment (please) most every young adult will walk away uninformed about proper safety if and most likely when they ignore the advice of "its better just not too," instead of saying don't, but if you do, keep these things in mind to be as safe as possible.


If there were to be a sticky or there was to be advice given, it should list the risks and if you still wish to handle, these are the things to do to maximize the safety of the animal and the owner. This way people who won't heed part A can read part B and increase their chance the experience will be positive for them and not negative for them or the T.

Plenty of people handle their T' s and do so responsibly. I dont but others do and they have no issues. Instead of listing everything as no, list the absolute no's like handling an OWs, risks of handling anything and safe practices if you choose to handle.

In the end that will save more T's than just saying no.
 

Salmonsaladsandwich

Arachnobaron
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Jul 28, 2016
Messages
498
If you don't want to have to use a completely different enclosure, you could probably make the exo terra tank better by putting it on the floor (to eliminate fall risk) and add a sheet of plastic behind the doors or build some kind of embankment out of bark or other decorations so you can add more substrate.
 

Hakuna

Arachnopeon
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Apr 20, 2020
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41
There is no benefit to holding a tarantula. You can not train them. There is no emotional attachment from them and they do no desire cuddling...not necessary. The only thing you’re doing is risking it escaping or dropping it.
 

Matt Man

Arachnobaron
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I feel like this conversation is like telling a young adult sex is bad when they come to you for advice on how to safely do it. In similar circumstances before mods delete the comment (please) most every young adult will walk away uninformed about proper safety if and most likely when they ignore the advice of "its better just not too," instead of saying don't, but if you do, keep these things in mind to be as safe as possible.


If there were to be a sticky or there was to be advice given, it should list the risks and if you still wish to handle, these are the things to do to maximize the safety of the animal and the owner. This way people who won't heed part A can read part B and increase their chance the experience will be positive for them and not negative for them or the T.

Plenty of people handle their T' s and do so responsibly. I dont but others do and they have no issues. Instead of listing everything as no, list the absolute no's like handling an OWs, risks of handling anything and safe practices if you choose to handle.

In the end that will save more T's than just saying no.
I share this opinion
people are going to do it, all we can do is
A) Discourage them from Doing So
B) Give them the proper info so that if they do, we reduce T Mortality
 

SquidStina

Arachnopeon
Joined
Dec 11, 2017
Messages
26
If you really want to handle a spider I would recommend getting a jumping spider. They seem to be alright with handling, and don't carry as much risk regarding falls and injuries. Tarantulas as pets are more like.. leggy land fish. Just for watching. :)
 

spideyspinneret78

Arachnobaron
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I wouldn't do it. Tarantulas are not social creatures, do not form bonds with humans, and view us as potential predators. Being taken out of their territory and held by an animal hundreds of times their size is stressful. Even though they are tough creatures, they are still quite fragile and vulnerable to falls and accidental injuries when a human uses too much strength. They are still wild animals...so if they feel threatened they may bite or kick urticating hairs to defend themselves. All things considered, it's just not worth it for you or your pet. You'll get plenty of satisfaction from watching their behavior inside their enclosure.
 

Paul Bisacca

Arachnopeon
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Joined
Apr 17, 2020
Messages
27
That is not an appropriate setup for this animal at all.

1. Exo Terra front opening enclosures are not appropriate for any terrestrial species. The do not allow for enough substrate to be put in them and they are an extreme fall risk.
2. Aphonopelma seemanni is an obligate burrower (fossorial) who requires several inches deep substrate that is kept moist on the bottom layers.

Handling is the last thing you should be prioritizing at the moment when your animal is living in a deathtrap. You need to basically scrap the entire setup that you have this animal in and start from scratch. You need a deep enclosure that allows for several inches of substrate for this animal to burrow in. You need to make a starter burrow using that hide and place it at an angle in the substrate to help them out and encourage them to burrow underneath. You need a fairly large water dish and you need to pour water into the corners to make the bottom layers of substrate damp while keeping the surface dry and packed down.
ExoTerra - you can add as much substrate as needed and just use the top, these posts about Exo are nonsense.
 

Salmonsaladsandwich

Arachnobaron
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Jul 28, 2016
Messages
498
ExoTerra - you can add as much substrate as needed and just use the top, these posts about Exo are nonsense.
I assume you mean turning the tank on its side and have the door face up?

Not sure why people are disagreeing with you. Sounds like a great setup.
 

vicareux

Arachnosquire
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Mar 14, 2020
Messages
75
I assume you mean turning the tank on its side and have the door face up?

Not sure why people are disagreeing with you. Sounds like a great setup.
Yep,there is even a thread here on arachnoboards that gives a nice guide how to do so
 

Paul Bisacca

Arachnopeon
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Joined
Apr 17, 2020
Messages
27
And?

Leave it, it is is fine. These "experts" will flame you on this site, but if it is working don't fix it.
 
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