Handling hot scorps

Bry

Arachnodemon
Old Timer
Joined
Mar 22, 2003
Messages
773
Okay, I know the subject is a bit misleading, but, I didn't mean handling them directly. I've noticed quite a few of you keep rather hot sp. of scorps, i.e. Parabuthus sp., Androctonus sp., etc. I've heard scorps move very quickly when they intend to sting somebody. If anything, what do you guys do differently when working around them in their cage as opposed to working around Hadogenes, Hadrurus, or Pandinus sp.? Do you house them any differently with safety in mind? I was thinking about the differences in care between hot snakes and non-vens. In working with venomous snakes, responsible keepers have more secure caging, separate rooms for hots, use tools such as hooks, tubes, tongs as much as necessary, among other things. Also, when working with them, the handlers are far more careful than when it comes to handling rat snakes with an attitude. So, I was wondering, because there are a few species quite capable of sending you to the big sleep.

Bry
 

CID143ti

Arachnoknight
Old Timer
Joined
May 3, 2003
Messages
261
I use 12” forceps when I have to enter their cage. They work great for picking up small things such as food remains. I use a spray bottle to mist cages and top off water bowls. Just try to minimize your contact with the scorpions; hot or not.

W. Smith
 

Bry

Arachnodemon
Old Timer
Joined
Mar 22, 2003
Messages
773
Do these 12" forceps come with rubber tips? Where do you get these? What about the Parabuthus sp.? These don't need to come into contact with you in order to envenomate you. Do you wear goggles around them or something?

Bry
 

CID143ti

Arachnoknight
Old Timer
Joined
May 3, 2003
Messages
261
Mine didn’t, but I put some air tubing for fish tanks on the tips. You can order them from some of the larger invert and herp suppliers. You can also find them at a medical supply store but they won’t have the rubber tips.

I’ve been advised to use goggles when working with them but I usually don’t. I guess that is a little irresponsible...and I don’t recommend doing this. I usually stay at least an arm length away or look through the side of the container if I have to do any maintenance work. I think envenomed usually refers to the injection of venom or poison. I’m not sure if there is another term for being sprayed by venom. I believe you have to worry about two different reactions depending on the method the toxin is delivered. Recently, scientists have been doing studies on Parabuthus toxin and discovered that Parabuthus, and other scorpions, have two types of toxin. Just a thought, but maybe the toxin being delivered varies with the method of delivery in Parabuthus. Hopefully some of the more experienced and knowledgeable members will have some more information on this subject…I think I just confused myself.

Hope this helps,

W. Smith
 

skinheaddave

SkorpionSkin
Arachnosupporter +
Joined
Aug 15, 2002
Messages
4,342
I fundementaly deal with all my scorpions the same way. Keep my hands away, use instruments to handle them and never ever make a move until I know where they are. That being said, there are a few deviations from that protocol:

- I wear goggles (okay, sometimes just my glasses) with my Parabuthis and nothing else
- I handle my Opisthacanthus with my hands. I am always handling them to show people etc. and I figure it doesn't make sense to hold them one minute and cower at the end of my 18" forceps the next. This is the only species I handle this way.

As for actual handling methods, cupping them works well. If you have to "tail" them, I like tweezers with airline tubing for the small stuff and forceps dipped in "Plastidip" for the big stuff. I NEVER tail anything with my hands.

Cheers,
Dave

P.S. Almost forgot. If my hands are shakey or I am tired or distracted, I don't even think of opening a hot enclosure. I sometimes will play with the milder stuff, but I still like to give the whole lot a miss if I am not able to react quickly and precisely.
 
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