Handling Heteropteryx dilatata (jungle nymph)

Carthropod

Arachnosquire
Joined
Mar 8, 2020
Messages
133
Hey, im back after around a year with a question,
I am now finally allowed to get more stick insects, and i wanted a big chunky one and in my mind Heteropteryx dilatata (jungle nymph) was the coolest. but i am not sure if i can mentally handle a big agressive green spike slapping bush. or are they really not that aggresive

are there any alternative next to macleay spectres?
 

ColeopteraC

Arachnobaron
Active Member
Joined
Mar 8, 2020
Messages
409
Hey, im back after around a year with a question,
I am now finally allowed to get more stick insects, and i wanted a big chunky one and in my mind Heteropteryx dilatata (jungle nymph) was the coolest. but i am not sure if i can mentally handle a big agressive green spike slapping bush. or are they really not that aggresive

are there any alternative next to macleay spectres?
They aren’t aggressive to the point of being
non-handleable. They can be quite nasty (aren’t an ‘easy handle’ sp. and have drawn blood from me a couple of times) but certainly not to an unbearable extent. I handle mine frequently, be gentle when removing them from the enclosure and most risk is averted.

Alternatives (in terms of size) are plentiful, paracyphocrania major, diapherodes gigantea and some of the bigger Haaniella are interesting.

Also look around the following genera; eurycnema, phobaeticus, nesiophasma or tirachoidea (if you want to get really big).
 

corydalis

Arachnopeon
Joined
Jun 27, 2019
Messages
37
No need to stress yourself over it, you will be fine. I was merely 13 back then, when I received my adult pair of H.dilatata and I could handle the situation without issue. They can be defensive, although in most cases its nothing more than throwing a threat posture, and make hissing sounds(female), if you try to grab them, then it can be an unpleasant experience of course, since they are very able to grab you back with their spiky hind legs.
 

Carthropod

Arachnosquire
Joined
Mar 8, 2020
Messages
133
They aren’t aggressive to the point of being
non-handleable. They can be quite nasty (aren’t an ‘easy handle’ sp. and have drawn blood from me a couple of times) but certainly not to an unbearable extent. I handle mine frequently, be gentle when removing them from the enclosure and most risk is averted.

Alternatives (in terms of size) are plentiful, paracyphocrania major, diapherodes gigantea and some of the bigger Haaniella are interesting.

Also look around the following genera; eurycnema, phobaeticus, nesiophasma or tirachoidea (if you want to get really big).
No need to stress yourself over it, you will be fine. I was merely 13 back then, when I received my adult pair of H.dilatata and I could handle the situation without issue. They can be defensive, although in most cases its nothing more than throwing a threat posture, and make hissing sounds(female), if you try to grab them, then it can be an unpleasant experience of course, since they are very able to grab you back with their spiky hind legs.
bit late response but here i come

i finally after 1 year got my parents to be less strict about stick insects, i already added Sungaya inexpectata to my collection.
(there was a chance my dad was drunk when he said it) but i am allowed to get H.dilatata.
any reccomadations*(excuse my english) for an enclosure? i already decided if i keep that ''nice'' of a species i want ti to be a fully bioactive enclosure(if possible), and i will absolutely do my best as making it as beautifull as possible!
 
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