gut loading locusts

clive 82

Arachnoknight
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Sep 11, 2016
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205
Hi guys,
I read recently that locusts should not be gut loaded because the food they are fed doesn't get djgested & turns almost toxic in the stomach, killing the locust.
This sounds quite weird to me.
Has anyone got any more info on this?
 

viper69

ArachnoGod
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Dec 8, 2006
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11,517
Hi guys,
I read recently that locusts should not be gut loaded because the food they are fed doesn't get djgested & turns almost toxic in the stomach, killing the locust.
This sounds quite weird to me.
Has anyone got any more info on this?
Where did you read this, citation please....

Chameleon owners, like myself, gutload these insects with no issues.
 

EulersK

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Feb 22, 2013
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Okay, hold on a second, let's use our heads here...

A locust eats, and its food becomes toxic in the stomach, leading to death. If this were true, how would this animal survive to reproduce? Locusts are garbage disposals in the wild. They destroy crops, and they're good at it. What you read sound like someone trolling, honestly.
 

Venom1080

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Okay, hold on a second, let's use our heads here...

A locust eats, and its food becomes toxic in the stomach, leading to death. If this were true, how would this animal survive to reproduce? Locusts are garbage disposals in the wild. They destroy crops, and they're good at it. What you read sound like someone trolling, honestly.
i read that they build up a tolerance to pesticides over time, so it doesnt affect them or their predators in the wild very much. but it would sure affect a non native CB tarantula.
 

EulersK

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Pesticide
i read that they build up a tolerance to pesticides over time, so it doesnt affect them or their predators in the wild very much. but it would sure affect a non native CB tarantula.
Where in the original message does the OP mention pesticides? He's talking about the locust's body chemistry turning food into toxins that kill the locust. Unless I'm missing something huge here, we're talking about different things...
 

Venom1080

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Where in the original message does the OP mention pesticides? He's talking about the locust's body chemistry turning food into toxins that kill the locust. Unless I'm missing something huge here, we're talking about different things...
nvrmind, i saw pesticide and thought thats thats what you were talking about.
 

cr4igo

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May 25, 2016
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"Hi guys,
I read recently that locusts should not be gut loaded because the food they are fed doesn't get djgested & turns almost toxic in the stomach, killing the locust"

My 'SUGGESTION' is relevant because locusts are not toxic by any means. The thing that would make them toxic is the food they consume while swarming pesticide sprayed plains or wherever they roam. I'm sure they've developed immunity to the pesticide like most insects--> cockroaches--> do

He is asking why or how they are toxic. I am simply suggesting they are toxic because of the pesticides on what they eat. SO, if a boardmember hand gut feeds a locust... they could potentially be fine for the T if there is no pesticide present.

I had figured this is a DISCUSSION board. I'm not claiming to be right or wrong. Simply having a conversation @viper69
@EulersK
 

viper69

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"Hi guys,
I read recently that locusts should not be gut loaded because the food they are fed doesn't get djgested & turns almost toxic in the stomach, killing the locust"

My 'SUGGESTION' is relevant because locusts are not toxic by any means. The thing that would make them toxic is the food they consume while swarming pesticide sprayed plains or wherever they roam. I'm sure they've developed immunity to the pesticide like most insects--> cockroaches--> do

He is asking why or how they are toxic. I am simply suggesting they are toxic because of the pesticides on what they eat. SO, if a boardmember hand gut feeds a locust... they could potentially be fine for the T if there is no pesticide present.

I had figured this is a DISCUSSION board. I'm not claiming to be right or wrong. Simply having a conversation @viper69
@EulersK
It is a discussion board. But throwing up a link isn't a discussion, nor a suggestion in this case. For TWO different readers, myself and @EulersK both thought your link was at worst supporting his statement, and at best misinformed.

If you had provided the information in Post 10, likely neither of us would have said a thing directed towards you. I know I wouldn't have. That info in 10 is a discussion, not a link w/out any explanation of its relevance.

In the future I suggest you explain the information you are providing to some degree to reduce confusion for the readers here.

Also, in the pet hobby, the term "gut loading" is always associated with feeder insects that are provided food by the owner. Not insects that are feeding in the wild and potentially consuming harmful substances.
 

cr4igo

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Quite the rebuttal... I had figured posting the link and reading OR stimulating the gears in our heads might let the OP or fellow board members come up with the answer. If you watch most threads... and I know you do, any post has several posts following. I'm helping address the issue. You're trying to micromanage | moderate what I'm posting regarding the issue. It seems that most threads end up that way anyhow.
 

cr4igo

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May 25, 2016
Messages
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Hi guys,
I read recently that locusts should not be gut loaded because the food they are fed doesn't get djgested & turns almost toxic in the stomach, killing the locust.
This sounds quite weird to me.
Has anyone got any more info on this?
It could potentially be what they eat! @viper69
 

viper69

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Dec 8, 2006
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Quite the rebuttal... I had figured posting the link and reading OR stimulating the gears in our heads might let the OP or fellow board members come up with the answer. If you watch most threads... and I know you do, any post has several posts following. I'm helping address the issue. You're trying to micromanage | moderate what I'm posting regarding the issue. It seems that most threads end up that way anyhow.
All I wrote is that when one provides so little information, in this case a link, there is a lot of room for confusion. Two different people were confused by your post, that's not a coincidence.

So my concluding point was simply there's a better way, ie more effective manner, to communicate the useful information you had provided later on. If you don't see that, I can't explain it any better.
 

EulersK

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Okay, now I understand where you were coming from @cr4igo. That link with the "Pesticide" caption was entirely left field without any provided context.

So then, yes, a feeder may be toxic to a tarantula... but that goes for all wild caught feeders. If I started feeding my dubia colony vegetables with pesticides geared towards arachnids, the roaches would likely survive and end up killing my spiders. The same would go for a locust, cricket, or pinkie. Which is exactly why wild caught feeders are never advised.
 

Ellenantula

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Sep 14, 2014
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Even with a bearded dragon, I don't 'gut load' anything. I offer any and all feeders their normal diet, on a regular basis, and then feed them to my pets. I have never heard of a feeder being poisoned by a normal diet for its species.
Just offer normal safe foods to your feeders.... and then feed them to your pets. Locusts, grasshoppers, crickets, roaches, mealies, etc.... Feed them a healthy diet and they will nourish your pets.
Maybe I misunderstood something???
 

clive 82

Arachnoknight
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Messages
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Okay, hold on a second, let's use our heads here...

A locust eats, and its food becomes toxic in the stomach, leading to death. If this were true, how would this animal survive to reproduce? Locusts are garbage disposals in the wild. They destroy crops, and they're good at it. What you read sound like someone trolling, honestly.[/QUOT
Exactly what I thought when I read this.
 
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