Great news for New Zealand Latrodectus.

Violet

Arachnosquire
Old Timer
Joined
Aug 18, 2009
Messages
125
“Killing New Zealand's most venomous spider could now earn culprits jail time or a $100,000 fine under changes to the law.”


Read more here.



I think this is fantastic news for New Zealand Invertebrates, particularly L.katipo. It’s just about impossible to police this type crime, but it most certainly raises awareness about the importance of our endangered creepy crawlies. Something I think most pople tend to ignore...

Feel free to add your opinions.
 

groovyspider

Arachnoknight
Joined
Aug 18, 2010
Messages
257
imo it should just about be like that for most critters i understand why people hunt deer its in order to make sure no over populating ok and most people on average probably kill 1-2 deer per season( iam not a hunter most of my hunting is done at the market lol) but say there a colony of spiders/scorps what ever have you one bomb can kill hundreds... if air flow is right thosands and some sp dont have very quick reproductive cycles and little animals have enough predators as is deer only have to watch out for front end of cars, bullets, and what panthers i guess? spiders have to watch out for man,pesticdes,lizards,some scorps,centipedes,birds, ect so they need to spread that law around :D
 

Widowman10

Arachno WIDOW
Old Timer
Joined
Jan 25, 2007
Messages
4,212
interesting, but cool. i wonder if they've researched anything else, or just stuck a fine on squishing a katipo. like: stopping human destruction of areas where they live (which is undoubtedly the absolute biggest concern), researching competing species, stopping or looking into invader/competitor species, etc, etc.

either way, would like to own me one!
 

Vespula

Arachnodemon
Joined
Jul 27, 2010
Messages
707
Woot! Yay, katipo!!! :D

Hopefully people will listen to this law.
 

Violet

Arachnosquire
Old Timer
Joined
Aug 18, 2009
Messages
125
i wonder if they've researched anything else, or just stuck a fine on squishing a katipo.
I think that is what Quentin Duthie of Forest & Bird meant by:

"We agree with the changes, but fear the Government is rearranging deckchairs on the Titanic rather than putting the ship on a course that will avoid wildlife disaster."



I agree with you widowman, I would love to see more of their habitat cordoned off and research done on the effects Steatoda (or other invasive species) could be having on the already fragile population. I feel this law is a step in the right direction.
 
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