Grasshoppers and Locusts

bugmankeith

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Are Grasshoppers and Locusts the same thing? Everytime I hear Locust on tv I see the swarms of flying insects destroying crops. Or mabye Locust is a term for the flying Grasshoppers when they swarm?
 

lucanidae

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There is no morphological difference, it is just two different common names for the same suborder.
 

AviculariaLover

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I learned about this in my insect bio class last semester, here is what I remember: "locust" is a migratory phase that occurs when grasshopper populations get too high. When a certian population density is reached, the up and coming nymphs, when they reach their adult stage, take on the "locust" form and start to swarm. They might look very different, but are the same species. And wikipedia has just confirmed that my memory serves me correctly.
 

Mr. Mordax

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The key part is that they look very different -- same species, two distinct morphs. The migratory (swarming) morph is built more for flying. I'd suggest checking out that wikipedia article for some more info.

But only locusts have the two distinct morphs. Your random grasshopper can't necessarily swarm the same way a true locust can.
 

moose35

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when grasshopper populations become overcrowded they actually morph into the locust form..it has something with the hairs on them touching each other.
i'll try to find a source.

tom

here..."""Research at Cambridge University has identified the swarming behaviour is a response to overcrowding. The trigger is increased tactile stimulation of the hind legs. Several contacts per minute over a four hour period are sufficient to induce transformation to the swarming variety""""
 

bugmankeith

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So, if someone caught some adult grasshoppers, and kept them together in a jar with food for a day (or mabye no food), when they were re-released they would show the "swarming behavior"?
 

HepCatMoe

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So, if someone caught some adult grasshoppers, and kept them together in a jar with food for a day (or mabye no food), when they were re-released they would show the "swarming behavior"?
no. i used to do this all the time when i was a kid. maybe i just had the wrong species of hopper but they never changed morphologically.

or at least i never noticed. but hey i was just a little kid catchin bugs in a jar.
 

AviculariaLover

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The change can't happen when they're adults. It happens when the young hoppers turn to the adult form, the current conditions tell them which form to make the final molt into.

And yeah, it only happens with certain species.
 

ballpython2

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buyin these online

does anyone know where i can buy grasshoppers online to use for breeder feeders for my tarantulas?
 

Digby Rigby

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Locusts or grasshopers?

Locusts are in the family or order of short horned grasshoppers. They ar differentiated from grasshoppers based on their breeding strategies. When kept under the right conditions they can be kept in the swarming phase indefinitely. They make excellent feeders and are relished by many species although some species of geckos seem to not like them, possibly due to the awkward shape of the rear legs. They have an excellent calcium to phosphorous ratio. They are an excellent staple diet.

Digby Rigby balboa28279@mypacks.net
 
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