grass

edgeofthefreak

Arachno-titled!
Joined
Apr 2, 2012
Messages
496
Heh, lately I've been playing a lot of "what can live in this?" and thought recently of grass. Not a lot of grass, but some in a small terrarium, maybe by a window sill. There's an alright chance that once it's established and living off natural light, that I could move it into the ground-level of an arboreal terrarium... or something. But mostly I like having jars of living things all around me. :)

Why I was thinking of grass: it can be cut to size, or height rather, so it wouldn't be too tall for any terrarium. Also, years of stomping on it in city parks has shown it can be resilient. It may need lots of light, but I'd like to hope there are a few arachnids that tolerate (or even enjoy) it. Aren't there a couple of diurnal species out there? :)
 

poisoned

Arachnodemon
Joined
Apr 17, 2012
Messages
690
Heh, lately I've been playing a lot of "what can live in this?" and thought recently of grass. Not a lot of grass, but some in a small terrarium, maybe by a window sill. There's an alright chance that once it's established and living off natural light, that I could move it into the ground-level of an arboreal terrarium... or something. But mostly I like having jars of living things all around me. :)

Why I was thinking of grass: it can be cut to size, or height rather, so it wouldn't be too tall for any terrarium. Also, years of stomping on it in city parks has shown it can be resilient. It may need lots of light, but I'd like to hope there are a few arachnids that tolerate (or even enjoy) it. Aren't there a couple of diurnal species out there? :)
I don't think there are any diurnal species, but there are diurnal specimens :)

I'm not saying you shouldn't do it, I'm just a bit sceptic :) Actually, I think that you should go for it! :)
For species, I'd look for non-desert webers or arboreal webers. H. incei or C. fasciatum would make use of it. Even better would be a H. incei communal.
 

The Snark

Dumpster Fire of the Gods
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7,988
Considering there are around 3,500 species of grass, the odds are pretty good you will find one compatible for all uses and occasions.
 

josh_r

Arachnoprince
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Jan 18, 2008
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1,131
Grass needs a lot of light to grow. Ts hate light
Not all species need a lot of light to grow and I am sure that having a lot of light on a T´s enclosure isn´t going to send it into a meltdown. T´s habitats are exposed to extreme amounts of light every day in the wild. If they can handle the rays of the sun, I am sure they can handle the light output of a fluorescent light or LED´s. Besides, that is what providing hides and proper substrate depths for burrowing is for :)
 

poisoned

Arachnodemon
Joined
Apr 17, 2012
Messages
690
Not all species need a lot of light to grow and I am sure that having a lot of light on a T´s enclosure isn´t going to send it into a meltdown. T´s habitats are exposed to extreme amounts of light every day in the wild. If they can handle the rays of the sun, I am sure they can handle the light output of a fluorescent light or LED´s. Besides, that is what providing hides and proper substrate depths for burrowing is for :)
They usually have option to escape the light. Not so much in enclosure.
 

The Snark

Dumpster Fire of the Gods
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There are a number of grasses that grow under rainforest canopy. That is, damp and no direct sunlight. Unfortunately, the general rule is the less light, the larger the grass blades are. As example we have a zero sunlight grass that is very attractive but it grows in clumps with up to 10 inch blades.
 

Roktman

Arachnopeon
Joined
Apr 29, 2013
Messages
22
If you're talking about turfgrass, the fescues are more of a low light level plant. They still need light but can tolerate moderate to dappled heavy shade. On the other hand if you have a decent light I would recommend the ryes. The thing with them is that they are "one seed, one plant" and won't take over the floor space like bluegrass etc... I think it might look nice with a little tuft here and there.

My turfgrass management certification finally becomes useful... LOL :wink:
 

The Snark

Dumpster Fire of the Gods
Old Timer
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7,988
How about dichondra? Grows in shade, very short and decorative.
 

Roktman

Arachnopeon
Joined
Apr 29, 2013
Messages
22
Dichondra is nice and small, but it spreads by its creeping stems so you would continually have to prune it back to keep it from taking over, unless that's what you want. ;-) Try looking for something that's clumping, and it will stay in bounds longer.
You could also look for websites that carry or specialize in rock garden plants. These would naturally remain small and tidy over a longer period if time. My fab place for plants like these are http://siskiyourareplantnursery.com/ . I have no financial stake in this place other than being a happy customer. Just my 2 cents.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk 2
 

josh_r

Arachnoprince
Old Timer
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Jan 18, 2008
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They usually have option to escape the light. Not so much in enclosure.
So you're telling me that T's don't burrow and hide in captivity???

As for the grass, you may want to go to your local nurseries and talk to them about different grass species available that are short and tolerate lower light levels. It is a good start. If that doesn't work, there are plenty of online nurseries.... Unfortunately, grass is not often used in the planted vivarium, so not too many people have much experience with it.
If you can't find something that is small, you could always try a slightly larger species and provide it low levels of nutrients to stunt its growth.
 

Pandinus97

Arachnopeon
Joined
Oct 17, 2013
Messages
36
The thing that could be done with the grass in the vivarium is letting it grow out before putting the
T in the enclosure, that way it can create its own tunnels or hides within the grasses. Again if the
grass is high enough a dim light may work for the T.
 
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