Grass Spider?

Salt

Arachnopeon
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I found one of these at the train station today. She was a little stressed, but grass spiders probably shouldn't be on train station benches. I relocated her to some grass.

She was incredibly fast, and quite aggressive (I don't think she bit me but the assumed the threat posture on many occasions). What confused me though is that at one point she started jumping, and running sideways?

Are there any crab spiders that can be confused with grass spiders?

Agelenopsis spp.
 

loxoscelesfear

Arachnoprince
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Rabidosa wolf spider. May want to move your post to True spiders & other Arachnids section for more feedback. Many knowledgeable people there.
 

Venom

Arachnoprince
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Definitely a Rabidosa, as an Agelenopsis would have a herringbone patter on the ventral abdomen, rather than a continuation of the dark/ light streak pattern.
 

Salt

Arachnopeon
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I considered Wolf Spider but she had 8 small eyes, not 2 large ones (I can't remember if wolves have 4 eyes underneath the 2 large ones or not?).

---------- Post added at 08:22 PM ---------- Previous post was at 08:18 PM ----------

Oh and also this was in South England, which is probably important.
 

jsloan

Arachnoangel
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From the photo's, the specimen looks to be a R. rabida (Rabid Wolf Spider).
I see only one photo from the OP, and from it I'd say this spider is probably not R. rabida and that R. punctulata is a better possibility. R. rabida has a series of light-colored patches along the edges of the dark central stripe on the top of the abdomen:

http://bugguide.net/node/view/475960/bgimage

R. punctulata has a solid, unbroken dark brown stripe down the center of the abdomen. The OP's spider matches this one:

http://bugguide.net/node/view/353837/bgimage

Here's a good paper that explains the differences between the five Rabidosa species found in NA:

http://www.americanarachnology.org/JoA_free/JoA_v22_n2/JoA_v22_p138.pdf

To the OP: have you got any pictures of the underside of this spider? That would also help with the ID.

The jumping behavior is not unusual for wolfies. I've seen that many times, especially when they're going through grass. You've got a nice spider there.

South England? That's interesting. I didn't know that Rabidosa were found there. I'll have to do some checking for other species.
 
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Salt

Arachnopeon
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Unfortunately this is the only photo I have. I let her go soon after.

It was definitely a female - if that helps.
 

jsloan

Arachnoangel
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Oh and also this was in South England, which is probably important.
Do you mean south England, or south New England? According to the World Spider Catalog, Rabidosa sp are found only in North America. There aren't supposed to be any in England.
 

davisfam

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Thanks OP for a location, it's appreciated although Rabid Wolfiies are not found in England.. Hmm. We'll try to do more research to help out! :)

jsolan; As always, it's hard to ID any species from a photo view.. our guess was not 100% or else we would have stated that in the post. We're still not definite on an ID at the moment because we would need more photo's of the specimen and even then, the ID might not be 100% accurate. We were simply tossing out a suggestion from a quick glance followed up with information for the OP to learn and do research themselves.
 

Salt

Arachnopeon
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England, UK. In East Sussex to be precise.

---------- Post added at 09:24 PM ---------- Previous post was at 09:22 PM ----------

And yeah I've done some research, I suspect it may have been imported. It wasn't in Heathlands (like grass spiders), and it was too big and jumpy. Didn't make sense to be a grass spider.

Thanks guys :) If you have any more suggestions let me know! It's quite interesting stuff :p True Spiders are so much more interesting than Ts
 

jsloan

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England, UK. In East Sussex to be precise. And yeah I've done some research, I suspect it may have been imported. It wasn't in Heathlands (like grass spiders), and it was too big and jumpy. Didn't make sense to be a grass spider.
Maybe it jumped out of someone's pocket? Somewhere in England right now there's a sad spider hobbyist who is missing a wolf spider. :)
 
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Salt

Arachnopeon
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Maybe it jumped out of someone's pocket? Somewhere in England right now there's a sad spider hobbyist who is missing a wolf spider. :)
Well let's hope it was pregnant!

A population of large wolf spiders (other than our tiny 7mm P. amentata and similar species) in Britain could be a good thing. Hopefully they mutate and grow big enough to start eating annoying children.
 

revilo

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Feb 2, 2010
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hi all !

just two minds :
- south england is the "european florida", that means there are a lot of invaders...
- next it seems to me like we have a juvenile here (maybe i'm wrong, but i think so) and juvs are often not "completed" in coloration (sorry don't know wright to explain in english:eek: )

bye, oli
 
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