Good species for beginners

Charlottesweb17

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Jan 31, 2017
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Hi all!

So as I posted here some time ago I am a newbie and looking for my first T!
I read on a tarantula web that there are 5 good species for beginners. I have narrowed my choice to 3. However, I was recently told by a breeder that one of my choices and first choice, a Pink Zebra Beauty is not really a great choice for beginners either.
My other choices are Honduran Curly Hair and Mexican Red Knee.
I have seen a lot of Chilean and Pink Toed.
Can anyone make a good recommendation?
 

Crowbi

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Oct 31, 2016
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In all honesty, as long as you don't plan on handling your T (or don't care whether you do or not), I'd just pick whatever species you like the most, research it and get that.

This is coming from someone who only started in the hobby in November last year and have 16 spiders now (13 tarantulas, 5 of them are OW Ts).
 

nicodimus22

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My other choices are Honduran Curly Hair and Mexican Red Knee.
Can anyone make a good recommendation?
If at all possible, avoid pet stores. They often house them incorrectly, misidentify them (comes from using common names instead of Genus and Species names) and give you improper advice on care. Also, their selection and prices usually suck.

IMO, the best overall starter Ts would be:

Grammostola pulchripes
Grammostola pulchra
Homoeomma Sp. Red (aka Euathlus Sp. Red)
Brachypelma albopilosum
Brachypelma smithi

If you really want to start with an arboreal species, Avicularia avicularia.

No matter what you get, research the snot out of it beforehand so there are no surprises.
 
Last edited:

EulersK

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First, learn to start using scientific names. Common names leave a lot to be desired, because "Mexican red knee" could be one of no less than five different species. Second, A. seemanni (what I assume you mean by Pink Zebra) is a fine beginner, but it can be a bit of a pet hole. Definitely easy to care for, though.

Take a look at this, see if there's something you like:
 

Kayis

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Sep 26, 2016
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However, I was recently told by a breeder that one of my choices and first choice, a Pink Zebra Beauty is not really a great choice for beginners either.
Pink zebra beauty I believe would be the common name of Eupalaestrus campestratus. If that is the case than whoever told you it's not a good choice for a beginner probably only said that because of availability and slow growth. If those aren't a concern than it's a darn good beginner T.
 

skyvie

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Apr 14, 2014
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Yeah, everybody has given great advice, and there's a definite need to use scientific names to ensure we're discussing the right tarantula..."Pink Zebra Beauty" is usually Eupalaestrus Campestratus, but not always (E. Campestratus is a great beginner choice).

Something that hasn't been mentioned is growth speed. If you get an adult, this doesn't matter as much, but if you get a smaller T, waiting around for it to molt (get bigger) may be a little disappointing. Also, some (like Brachypelma species) like to refuse food frequently. That's also a little disappointing and scary for a new keeper.

Overall, my first pick would be Grammostola pulchripes as the best beginner terrestrial (great appetite, get decent size, grow pretty quick, calm, inexpensive), though the others mentioned are fine.
 

Charlottesweb17

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Jan 31, 2017
Messages
34
If at all possible, avoid pet stores. They often house them incorrectly, misidentify them (comes from using common names instead of Genus and Species names) and give you improper advice on care. Also, their selection and prices usually suck.

IMO, the best overall starter Ts would be:

Grammostola pulchripes
Grammostola pulchra
Homoeomma Sp. Red (aka Euathlus Sp. Red)
Brachypelma albopilosum
Brachypelma smithi

If you really want to start with an arboreal species, Avicularia avicularia.

No matter what you get, research the snot out of it beforehand so there are no surprises.
I have been researching and reading everything possible. They don't sell Ts in pet stores here. Thank you I will look at those species and the B.smithi was in my list of faves already.
 

Kayis

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Sep 26, 2016
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37
In all honesty, as long as you don't plan on handling your T (or don't care whether you do or not), I'd just pick whatever species you like the most, research it and get that.
I wasn't going to really comment on this but i'm really against that idea lol. I understand you're doing well with them but that doesn't mean everyone soaks up the same amount of knowledge as you. Just because he/she won't handle it does not mean they won't make a mistake and not get bit.
 

Charlottesweb17

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Jan 31, 2017
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Pink zebra beauty I believe would be the common name of Eupalaestrus campestratus. If that is the case than whoever told you it's not a good choice for a beginner probably only said that because of availability and slow growth. If those aren't a concern than it's a darn good beginner T.
The slow growth was not a concern, breeder said they were skittish.
The appealing part was slow growth and how long they live.
Thank you for confirming my top choice. Can't seem to find anyone who sells them.
 

Kayis

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Sep 26, 2016
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Worthless post now, due to fail on my part. Ignore :bag:
 
Last edited:

Andrea82

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If you can find them, E.campestratus (Pink Zebra Beauty) can make for a very good first T. My lady is the calmest of my T's, even surpassing the Euathlus sp. Red, since she doesn't crawl oit of her enclosure and on to me first chance she gets, what the E.sp Red tries every single time.
She has a nice feeding response, likes to redecorate now and then.
I would get a juvie or adult, since they grow fairly slow.
Another thing i've noticed, (but i'm not sure if this is standard for this species, and not just mine being a nutcase) is that she takes her time for molting.
Her last molt lasted (premolt and post molt included) 6 months. But that could have been just my fault though, maybe i fed her too much, which means a longer premolt. @VanessaS might know more about that.
TL;DR
Great beginner, docile but good eaters, fairly active for a Theraphosid :)
 

Vanessa

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Unfortunately, the chances of find an E.campestratus, spiderling or older, or an Euathlus sp. Red anything older than 1/4" spiderling in Canada is slim and none.
That is why I asked about which dealer. No use making suggestions of spiders who are not available in Canada.
 

Vanessa

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I think Anastasia has them up for sale on her website. http://www.net-bug.net/
Edit: she's down to two lol
The poster is in Canada. If you hover over her profile information, next to her posts, you will see that she is in Canada.
Chances of finding any E. campestratus in Canada, any at all, is slim and none.
Your only option is to take out a free Kijiji ad and say that you are looking for one. The last one I saw for sale was a $300 adult female and that was almost a year ago. Dealers have not had spiderlings for a year either.
That is why I asked what dealer the OP was going to order from. It is a waste of time suggesting all these species that she just ain't gonna find in Canada.
 

Tanner Dzula

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Feb 29, 2016
Messages
190
for a first T i would HIGHLY recommend a B. Albopilosum(Honduran Curly Hair)
this was the first T i ever had(also my profile pic)
they are a great species, very mild temperament, very low maintenance, basic Enclosure set ups AND they are very very hard to accidentally kill.

of the species I've owned I'm glad that THIS was my first one.
on top of how easy they are to care for they really are a beautiful species, Having the Long pink hairs in direct contrast with this Almost black Hairs of their body.

plus if you snag female they can live a very long time!
 

clive 82

Arachnoknight
Active Member
Joined
Sep 11, 2016
Messages
205
Hi all!

So as I posted here some time ago I am a newbie and looking for my first T!
I read on a tarantula web that there are 5 good species for beginners. I have narrowed my choice to 3. However, I was recently told by a breeder that one of my choices and first choice, a Pink Zebra Beauty is not really a great choice for beginners either.
My other choices are Honduran Curly Hair and Mexican Red Knee.
I have seen a lot of Chilean and Pink Toed.
Can anyone make a good recommendation?[/Q
If at all possible, avoid pet stores. They often house them incorrectly, misidentify them (comes from using common names instead of Genus and Species names) and give you improper advice on care. Also, their selection and prices usually suck.

IMO, the best overall starter Ts would be:

Grammostola pulchripes
Grammostola pulchra
Homoeomma Sp. Red (aka Euathlus Sp. Red)
Brachypelma albopilosum
Brachypelma smithi

If you really want to start with an arboreal species, Avicularia avicularia.

No matter what you get, research the snot out of it beforehand so there are no surprises.
Couldn't agree more with this list for starter Ts. As mentioned I also tend to avoid pet stores for the same reasons.
 

nicodimus22

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709
She's talking about our links for E. Campestratus since op is from canada
Gotcha. Well, I was just trying to be helpful even though E. camp wasn't one of my suggestions.

Maybe I'm being lazy here, but I never hover over people's avatars. I just address the posts they've made.
 
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