Good centipede for a beginner?

Ratmosphere

Arachnoking
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This is what I came up with. I will add cork bark once I get more from the next reptile expo.

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Thoughts?
 

LawnShrimp

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Depending on how long the centipede is, add more substrate. Neither angulata nor polymorpha are climbers and don't get massive, so a little more sub for burrowing would be nice. Regardless of species/size, those fake plants are an easy way to climb out. Plastic plants are more for aesthetics than function; you may see it as decoration, the centipede sees it as an escape route.

Some dead yellow moss on the substrate might be nice for it to hide under and the cork flat you mentioned would be perfect. Otherwise, a good setup!
 

LawnShrimp

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Thanks! I'll remove the plants and add more substrate.
Be careful though. I left a the lid to a mutilans cup open and the little bugger used its maxilipeds as climbing claws to get to the top and crawled through a millimeters-wide gap. Fortunately I saw the whole whole thing and was able to catch it, and compressed the sub to a level that the 'pede couldn't climb.
 
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Ratmosphere

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FullSizeRender-7.jpg

Luckily I got the one with a tighter fitting lid that locks nicely. The others at Walmart were so flimsy I was surprised. This was the firmest one! Do you think it will be alright?
 

LawnShrimp

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Unless you really want to add more, that is a good sub depth. (I misunderestimated how large the container was; with a hand for reference it's a little easier to judge.) I think either species would be happy there.
 

Depro900

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For pedes there's no better enclosures than large plastic tubs. No silicone corners for them to climb up and certified in a massive variety of sizes to suit every pede throughout the life of it.
What if you want something a little more 'eye pleasing' than a plastic tub. Couldn't a tall glass enclosure with a secure lid work? There must be other options o_O
 

JDS123

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Speaking about size watch this video. I mean... how much chubby and huge that frog is? So compare that wonderful Asian 'pede... impressive, what can I say.

Bro lol, so many emotions lol. Crazy, sad, gross, cool, I like frogs so yeah lol.
 

Chris LXXIX

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What if you want something a little more 'eye pleasing' than a plastic tub. Couldn't a tall glass enclosure with a secure lid work? There must be other options o_O
Well they aren't that crappy to see, ah ah, certain models aren't bad at all :)

You can use glass enclosures as well, no matter. I know 'pede keepers that here in Italy keeps those buggers into glass ones... just pay attention to silicone in the corners.
 

JDS123

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I think the lids are the biggest concern. Some seal up real good and solid, others seem like they do, but if you wiggle your finger around an edge you can bush right through. Glass enclosures are tough because the typical screen tops they make have little voids in the corners, you can customize them. I say do glass, fix the lid for maximum security, and make the glass enclosure at least 2 times as tall as the pedes will grow in length. Most show tanks are taller.
 

JDS123

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I think the lids are the biggest concern. Some seal up real good and solid, others seem like they do, but if you wiggle your finger around an edge you can bush right through. Glass enclosures are tough because the typical screen tops they make have little voids in the corners, you can customize them. I say do glass, fix the lid for maximum security, and make the glass enclosure at least 2 times as tall as the pedes will grow in length. Most show tanks are taller.
That's just my opinion as I do not keep centipedes yet, only hav kept many Ts and millipedes.
 

Ratmosphere

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Does Scolopendra angulata venom pose a threat to a small dog if it gets bit?
 

LawnShrimp

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Does Scolopendra angulata venom pose a threat to a small dog if it gets bit?
angulata do not seem like escape-prone 'pedes. Fossorial species like that just poke their antennae or terminals out every now and then. In my own experience, burrowers like Rhysida and my unidentified often flee or remain still even if an opportunity presents itself, but when he smells fresh air, my bluelegged subspinipes can rear up on his terminals and penultimate legs to a truly fearsome height.

I doubt if angulata could damage a dog of any size.
 
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