Good beginner species?

Tayrantula

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Apr 8, 2017
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Hey y'all, for the past few months I've been obsessed with tarantulas and gathering all the info I can on them. I really really want one, but don't know which ones would make a good first T. I don't plan to handle my T a lot but I do need it to be docile enough to sit in my hand for a quick photoshoot. :p i also need something cheap and common as I don't have hundreds to spend. I have my eyes on the curly haired tarantula but im not sure yet.
 

WeightedAbyss75

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I'd probably say Grammostola pulchripes or Brachypelma albopilosum (curly hair). My big female pulchripes just died, so sadly I don't have mine anymore. She was great though, big and beautiful. My only qualm is that they can fast for weeks-months without any real warning or cause. I really enjoy my B. albo though. They grow *pretty* fast and eat like horses. Mine has never refused a meal, except before molting. Love their fuzzy, cuddly look they have :D Both are pretty docile and could probably chill on your hand for a few moments, but pics just on the floor or bark would probably be safer ;) IMO, I'd say the curly hair just for their appatite, being always visible/active, and fuzzy appearance. Either way, you may want to buy a juvenile. Both species are pretty slow growing, so getting one about 3" would help it be hardier and less sensetive to care mistakes :D
 

EulersK

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Heads up. You said that you've been interested for months... you may want to know that many tarantulas live for decades. Including B. albopilosum, the curly hair.
 

cold blood

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Grammostola pulchripes or Thrixopelma cyaneolum
Agreed, IMO these are the two best choices...cyaneolum can be difficult to find, but they're worth looking for...unreal calm.

Pulchripes on the other hand are very easy to locate and generally inexpensive...but spectacular ts for beginners...consistent appetites, faster growth than most beginner species and typically very docile and easy to work with and around.
 

KezyGLA

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As @viper69 has posted. The Euathlus sp. red is a fantastic beginner species too.

Although the T. cyaneolum may just be better ;)
 
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viper69

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As @viper69 has posted. The Ruathlus sp. red is a fantastic beginner species too.

Although the T. cyaneolum may just be better ;)
That's what CB says too. I haven't owned one yet, hard to find. You need produce a few sacs w/yours and ship them over here!
 

Kendricks

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Jan 18, 2017
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G. pulchra

- Looks drop dead gorgeous.
- Very forgiving.
- Good eater, doesn't fast for months.
- Out and about a lot.
- Hobby bulldozer.
- Doesn't kick hair like crazy.
- Will probably just endure the abuse of handling instead of acting defensive.
 

KezyGLA

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That's what CB says too. I haven't owned one yet, hard to find. You need produce a few sacs w/yours and ship them over here!
Impossible to find males. Only seen WC females. Thanks to @boina I will have a batch of slings with hopefully some males. I dont believe they have been captive bred in Europe yet. Someone correct me if I'm wrong. Never the less you must get one @viper69 you will fall in love.
 

ronoverdrive

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Personally I like my Euathlus sp. "Tiger" myself. Its a better looking and cheaper cousin to the sp. Red.
 

Arachnophoric

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G. pulchra

- Looks drop dead gorgeous.
- Very forgiving.
- Good eater, doesn't fast for months.
- Out and about a lot.
- Hobby bulldozer.
- Doesn't kick hair like crazy.
- Will probably just endure the abuse of handling instead of acting defensive.
I second this. I have 3 slings that are always out and about, and for the most part have never missed a meal. To boot, they're the only species out of my collection that I've intentionally handled (read - once, to check and make sure the individual was okay) and that was a very calm experience. Though as they get older I'd hesitate to even risk a bite. The fangs on an AF G. pulchra aren't something to play with. @_@

I'd also say Euathles sp. red, if you can find one. Something different from the usual G. rosea/porteri. They're also a smaller species that are incredibly docile in my experience. Very unintimidating for a first-time owner, and rather gorgeous IMHO :)
 

viper69

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Impossible to find males. Only seen WC females. Thanks to @boina I will have a batch of slings with hopefully some males. I dont believe they have been captive bred in Europe yet. Someone correct me if I'm wrong. Never the less you must get one @viper69 you will fall in love.
I have a contact in Europe that may know this. I'll ask on the breeding. I have to say it's pretty odd. We have a defined species that is an excellent T, a true winner, and we never see it. YET on the flip side, we have E sp Reds and Yellows, equally as good, but are not characterized and people have been breeding those instead.

I can only think T cyano's didn't gain traction for some reason OR it's an issue of supply.
 

viper69

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Personally I like my Euathlus sp. "Tiger" myself. Its a better looking and cheaper cousin to the sp. Red.

Better is a subjective and relative terms hahah.

Do you have a better shot, specifically a dorsal shot, that would be nice to see. I don't see these too often.
 

cold blood

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I can only think T cyano's didn't gain traction for some reason OR it's an issue of supply.
I think its both low supply, and selective availability within that specifically low supply.

See, they aren't imported regularly, and when they are, it really seems like they are literally ALL young females. The very first time I ever heard of slings in the hobby anywhere is when @boina bought a gravid female that dropped a sac...and I don't think she realized the rarity of her situation as she said the slings were quickly unloaded cheaply. Those slings are the first I have ever heard of in the hobby....males from that sac will prove to be unbelievably valuable to the hobby. The hobby...beginners in this hobby...need more of these ts available to them.
 
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boina

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No, I didn't realize the rarity of the situation :). But the thing is, no one really wanted the ones I kept for myself until @KezyGLA asked for them. It seems no one really knows about this species and therefore no one wants them except collectors and experts.
 
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