Golden Red Rump

Dementeddoll

Arachnopeon
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image.jpeg Hello everyone, I recently purchased a couple of spiders from a guy who was moving out of state. He was selling all of his collection for 10 bucks with the exoterra enclosures included. Of course I went for the nice one. I got my hands in a juvenile golden red rump. My question is are these spiders rarely active? I notice it just lingers in the same spot and doesn't move unless I move it forcefully. I've never had any other T do this. Earlier I took it out of the enclosure and it seemed healthy cuz it even kicked some of its hairs. Lol, but I kinda noticed the rump area didn't have the usual bald pattern as it normally does when getting ready to molt. It had more of a yellowish/white color. My moms T recently died and I've been doing research on causes of death. The only thing I thought of was a bad molt or nematodes. So I'm kinda paranoid right now wondering if that's a symptom that this juvenile is showing. It ate right away when I first bought it and this was a week ago. The Close up pic is what I'm talking about. Notice how it looks weird. The second pic is when I first got it.
 

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Graves6661

Arachnosquire
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The light coloration is normal. My A. geniculata had a bald patch similar to your Ts. It will darken up and become more bare as it gets closer to molting.

As for whether it is an active tarantula, I am not to familiar with this species. A photo of the whole enclosure might help some of the other members on here give better advice for you.
 

clive 82

Arachnoknight
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View attachment 225542 Hello everyone, I recently purchased a couple of spiders from a guy who was moving out of state. He was selling all of his collection for 10 bucks with the exoterra enclosures included. Of course I went for the nice one. I got my hands in a juvenile golden red rump. My question is are these spiders rarely active? I notice it just lingers in the same spot and doesn't move unless I move it forcefully. I've never had any other T do this. Earlier I took it out of the enclosure and it seemed healthy cuz it even kicked some of its hairs. Lol, but I kinda noticed the rump area didn't have the usual bald pattern as it normally does when getting ready to molt. It had more of a yellowish/white color. My moms T recently died and I've been doing research on causes of death. The only thing I thought of was a bad molt or nematodes. So I'm kinda paranoid right now wondering if that's a symptom that this juvenile is showing. It ate right away when I first bought it and this was a week ago. The Close up pic is what I'm talking about. Notice how it looks weird. The second pic is when I first got it.
They are not an overly active species, the classic pet rock really. Mine doesn't move that much which is fairly normal really. If its eating ok I wouldn't really worry. It looks to be in good health.
 

Dementeddoll

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Thanks I was just making sure. Glad it looks fine. Idk I think my moms tarantula passing just made me paranoid. Haha, it was a rescue though. The people who had it, had it in a small container with potting mix. They claimed they fed it the day before I rescued it but I know it was a lie because the rump was all shriveled and when I brought it home I changed the potting mix with actual coconut fiber. When I put it back in the enclosure it was trying to drink water from the soil until I pushed it towards the water bowl and it stood there drinking for about a hour. Then I put 20 crickets in there which it devoured them in a day and a half. So idk if it passed away just from the previous care it got before I rescued it. I gave it as a gift to my mom for Mother's Day. She was feeding it about 20 crickets a week. It was a big momma. Haha, it molted once in my moms care and she said she just woke up and noticed it still. She waited a day or two and she said no it didn't move and it just turned all white. I thought it was a bad molt but then I read about nematodes and thought maybe that was the cause of death but who knows. Me reading about nematodes just made me paranoid.
 

Trenor

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You have a nice looking Brachypelma albiceps.

Most tarantulas are not very active. Please don't poke or force your T to move. They are ambush predators and survive by not being as overly active. It's kicking hairs at you to make you leave it alone.

Most of my Ts are not very active. The most I see them move is when they are startled and when they are jumping on food. Feed it, give it a dish with clean water, and let it setup a home.
 

Dementeddoll

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Thanks and yeah I try keeping my T's enclosures very neat and clean for the most part as I display them proudly in my room. As far as me forcing it to move I just thought it was weird because all my previous T's I had have always been active so I thought something was wrong with this one. As it is my first time owning this species. It's a juvenile been trying to figure out the sex of it but I can't really tell. So I think I'm just gonna wait until it molts. Hoping it's a female. They get really beautiful once they reach adult hood.
 

Trenor

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No worries. If you have any questions regarding it's or other Ts care feel free to ask. :)
 

Bugmom

Arachnolord
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20 crickets a week is way, way, WAY too much food for any tarantula except the very, very big ones (the goliaths).

Your vagans is fine. Please don't ever feed it that much though. One cricket a week, two at most. Be prepared for it to refuse food for months at a time if in premolt.
 

Dementeddoll

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Oh, well my moms T was a big girl. It was a full grown Rosie. Idk it looked too big for a Rosie. My mom claimed it ate every single one as I would tell her to feed it only here and there and to remove any uneaten crickets or roaches. Yes, I know they refuse food for months. My red morph hybrid Rosie has been refusing for two months already. I just want it to molt already so it can get its nice red color again as it looks all dull and simple right now.
 

cold blood

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I notice it just lingers in the same spot and doesn't move unless I move it forcefully. I've never had any other T do this.

Earlier I took it out of the enclosure and it seemed healthy cuz it even kicked some of its hairs. Lol, but I kinda noticed the rump area didn't have the usual bald pattern as it normally does when getting ready to molt. It had more of a yellowish/white color.

My moms T recently died and I've been doing research on causes of death. The only thing I thought of was a bad molt or nematodes. So I'm kinda paranoid right now wondering if that's a symptom that this juvenile is showing. It ate right away when I first bought it and this was a week ago. The Close up pic is what I'm talking about. Notice how it looks weird. The second pic is when I first got it.
Never move a t forcefully, that's never a good plan...I mean, if it WAS in poor condition, would this be of help? answer: never! Inactivity is common.

You weren't sure if it was ok, so you took it out? Just think about how little sense that makes. It was flicking because it was disturbed and felt threatened, that's why they use defensive mechanisms like hair flicking. Probably best not to handle this species either, as they're very skittish and love flicking hairs. Ts that aren't handled or messed with, don't get bald spots generally, so bald spots aren't just usual. The color you saw is the normal color of the "skin". when it gets close to molting, then it turns black. The carapace of this species is just that color all the time as well.

Nematodes are pretty rare, if your t isn't/wasn't wild caught and not fed wild caught prey, it almost certainly wasn't nematodes.

Not sure what you mean, it looks like a perfectly normal looking B. albiceps.


I keep mine on soil, its not a problem, in fact, its my preferred substrate.

Thanks I was just making sure. Glad it looks fine. Idk I think my moms tarantula passing just made me paranoid. Haha, it was a rescue though. The people who had it, had it in a small container with potting mix.

Then I put 20 crickets in there which it devoured them in a day and a half. So idk if it passed away just from the previous care it got before I rescued it. I gave it as a gift to my mom for Mother's Day. She was feeding it about 20 crickets a week. It was a big momma. Haha, it molted once in my moms care and she said she just woke up and noticed it still. She waited a day or two and she said no it didn't move and it just turned all white.
What in the world, you put in 20 crickets at once?? Oh my god, never ever ever do that, under any circumstances. Its not a mammal, it doesn't need to be fattened quickly and it doesn't need 5 months of food in one night, that's absolutely crazy. And for a rosie, its about a year plus worth of food, as they have about the lowest food requirements and longest molt cycles in the t world...which means you have many years to fatten them.

The only time a t is "all white" is after molting. In time they harden up, and as they do, they re-gain their color. A rouge cricket could have easily killed a molting t, after a molt a t is just basically a buffet table for feeders. It could have also been what's known as a "wet molt", where the exoskeleton never hardens...very sad, and very rare, but it does happen and if it was white like that for days, its a likely possibility. There's nothing one can do for a wet molt.
 
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cold blood

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My red morph hybrid Rosie has been refusing for two months already. I just want it to molt already so it can get its nice red color again as it looks all dull and simple right now.
Pretty please, clarify this. "Red morph hybrid rosie" makes no sense. Morphs are something in the reptile world, not sure what the implication here is...and hybrids are about the worst thing in, and for the hobby...how do you know its a hybrid?

Adult "rose hairs" molt every 3-6 years, so you could be waiting. 2 months is barely a fast for them...many go a year or more.
 
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Dementeddoll

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Yeah that was my crazy ass mom. Lol, I just gave it that many when I first brought it home with me as it was starved but after that I would only feed it like 2/3 times a week. Idk my mom said she would be feeding it all the time. Like I said though I've never owned such a inactive species so I thought something might have been wrong with it. Now that I know I won't bother handling it either. As far as it being a wet molt idk. My mom told me over the phone she was bummed out. I didn't get a chance to see it.
 

Dementeddoll

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A red morph hybrid is a rose haired T but instead of it having the regular brownish tone to it it's like a reddish color. I bought it off someone like that. They are beautiful but from what I know it's from inner breeding different species.
 

Dementeddoll

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There it is I don't have it from a different angle but you can see the reddish color. And it has the rose hair as well.
 

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cold blood

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Yeah that was my crazy ass mom.

Lol, I just gave it that many when I first brought it home with me as it was starved but after that I would only feed it like 2/3 times a week. Idk my mom said she would be feeding it all the time.
You DID in fact feed 20 at once. Your assessment of needing that was also incorrect. A small abdomen is merely a sign that it molted recently. It can take 6 months to a year to molt again, that's how much time you have to fatten it (a juvenile B.albiceps, that is), there's no hurry.

A shriveled abdomen on the other hand is an indicator of dehydration...ts that recently molted, being much thinner, can be at a slightly higher risk of dehydration for people not providing a water dish.

Your mom may very well had a mis-lableled LP, especially considering you say it was very large...a rosie generally tops at 5 to 6" tops, anything exceeding that is a rarity.

A red morph hybrid is a rose haired T but instead of it having the regular brownish tone to it it's like a reddish color. I bought it off someone like that. They are beautiful but from what I know it's from inner breeding different species.
Ahhh, you have been mis informed. Rosie, or rose hair, is actually a generic common name that refers broadly to many similar Chilean species, the 2 most popular are rosea and porteri. Rosea being the red color form (not morph, as morphs are not the same) and the more drab, brown/copper one is the porteri, which is also the most common "version".

Cross breeding is bad in and for the hobby, literally about the worst thing. If someone is claiming such things, avoid them like the plague and NEVER, under any circumstances, buy ANYTHING from such a person. These aren't breeds like dogs, these are individual species in a hobby that is reliant on captive breeding. If we can't keep species separated/pure, we lose them forever, as there is no going back once frankenspiders are created...to breed hybrids is to help destroy the hobby and everything good breeders have built over the years.

This is a porteri.

 
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Dementeddoll

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Definitely understandable. Yeah the guy who sold me the Chaco gold knee was trying to make me take a different species male to breed with my female I said no. Wtf, haha. He's like you could sell them. I was like no thank you. I just simply like owning different specimens not making some jacked up ones. Besides I'll leave the breeding for more experienced owners. I keep mine as pets not for breeding or mating.
 

Dementeddoll

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As far as this Rosie I own it seems to be on the aggressive side so I never handle her only when I changing the su rate and cleaning their tanks.
 

cold blood

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As far as this Rosie I own it seems to be on the aggressive side so I never handle her only when I changing the su rate and cleaning their tanks.
That's good...yeah, they are notoriously moody.:)

Substrate never just has to be changed, it never goes bad (and its not reason to handle, most just move the t into a deli cup, then back). The porteri I posted the pic of is on decade old substrate. The only reasons to change substrate is if you have some sort of catastrophe, like a bug infestation. Its as easy as picking out boli as needed, they're not dirty animals like us warm bloods.
 

Dementeddoll

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Idk, I clean it once I kinda smell it funky but I think it's because of the crickets cuz they stink. Lol, yeah I put it in a container then move it back. Yeah she rarely lets me handle her so I don't bother. The one that is very docile is my Chaco gold knee. I had a versicolor pink toe but I sold it because at the time I had lost my job and needed the money. But damn I miss that one. It was beautiful. Would post pics of it but I got a different phone now so I don't have the pics in this phone. I'm actually trying to get my hands on a Mexican red knee, Brazilian black, and a cobalt blue. Those are the only other ones that catch my attention. Had a Brazilian black when I was 8 so I want one again. Oh and another one I'd like to own but they are too damn pricey are the sapphire ornamentals. Lol, other than that I'll be good. Not too crazy about spiders like most in here. I in general just rescue all kinds of animals. Raised hummingbirds, squirrels, opossums, Eagles, etc...then I release them.
 

cold blood

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Idk, I clean it once I kinda smell it funky but I think it's because of the crickets cuz they stink. Lol, yeah I put it in a container then move it back. Yeah she rarely lets me handle her so I don't bother. The one that is very docile is my Chaco gold knee. I had a versicolor pink toe but I sold it because at the time I had lost my job and needed the money. But damn I miss that one. It was beautiful. Would post pics of it but I got a different phone now so I don't have the pics in this phone. I'm actually trying to get my hands on a Mexican red knee, Brazilian black, and a cobalt blue. Those are the only other ones that catch my attention. Had a Brazilian black when I was 8 so I want one again. Oh and another one I'd like to own but they are too damn pricey are the sapphire ornamentals. Lol, other than that I'll be good. Not too crazy about spiders like most in here. I in general just rescue all kinds of animals. Raised hummingbirds, squirrels, opossums, Eagles, etc...then I release them.
Replacing sub is actually disruptive to the spider. Not a huge deal, but why force re-acclimation on them. Something is a miss, there shouldn't be any funky smells. Sounds like dead crickets hidden in the enclosure. There is huge benefits to just feeding one feeder at once and feeding a little less often.

The sapphire, which is Poecilotheria metallica is an advanced genus..very fast with medically significant venom. Same for H. lividium (cobalt blue)...but livivium is also fossorial, which means it lives underground, so you just don't see them. They're also exceptionally ornery, and prone to multiple bites at ones...advanced species as well.

B. smithi is wonderful and something you should definitely consider (same for pulchra).
 
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