golden baboon spiders

gasman

Arachnopeon
Joined
Jun 4, 2003
Messages
1
i was wanting general information all the golden baboon spider i own. i know what to feed and they hes very quick and has a mood problem. so i u have anything else to tell me it would help
 

Neo

Arachnosquire
Old Timer
Joined
May 9, 2003
Messages
145
This is not factual but I base some stuff on them about this. They like moisture but not too much around 80% is great for them. Very aggressive, but I've "tamed" some before. Some grow from medium speed to slow, rarely fast. Venom are said to be around middle but can sometimes be higher. Temperature should be high 70 around 80 since some orginate from Africa.

Once they make aburrow they rarely much, for my experience. Burrowers a lot some terrestrial.
 

Wade

Arachnoking
Old Timer
Joined
Aug 16, 2002
Messages
2,933
Are we talking about Pterinochilus murinus? If so, this could be on the T forum. IME these are very hardy and dry tolerant, but fast and defensive (i.e. "bitey").

Wade
 

RugbyDave

Arachnoprince
Old Timer
Joined
Apr 5, 2003
Messages
1,428
i agree, 80% is WAY to high! Mine stay right at about 60-65%,somtimes rising up to 70%, but never ever above!

and i don't think T's can ever be "tamed" in the general sense -- are you talking about when you handle the T it doesn't rear up or bite? although that goes into my opinions, so we'll just stick to the topic on hand! ;)

i find them more defensive than aggressive though. Their HTF is pretty quick though, somewhere around 10 :)

are you talking about a P.murinus?
peace
dave
 

phoenixxavierre

Arachnoprince
Old Timer
Joined
Oct 9, 2002
Messages
1,293
humidity

Hi all,

While P. murinus is easiest to keep on dry substrate for a couple different reasons, 1) less chance of mites, 2) many wild caughts come in with mites and dry substrate tends to dessicate these mites; I must point out here that their range is vary wide and they inhabit a wide variety of climates. Some are in wet areas, others in dry; most of these places vary in temps, and I would be surprised if there were a place where there was a constant steady temperature all year round. Most (if not all) environments change with the seasons, so usually it's wet and dry in each place at different times of the year (or even within the same month). I have kept P. murinus both ways. They tolerate both conditions, however, as mentioned, wet environments tend to draw mites, especially if leftovers from the theraposid's meal are about.

Thanks, Buspirone, that caresheet IS awesome. I was lucky enough to be given that by a very experienced keeper of Africans. Luc is an awesome guy!! and very knowledgeable!

Best wishes,

Paul
 

defour

Arachnobaron
Old Timer
Joined
May 17, 2003
Messages
347
Originally posted by Neo
This is not factual but I base some stuff on them about this. They like moisture but not too much around 80% is great for them. Very aggressive, but I've "tamed" some before. Some grow from medium speed to slow, rarely fast. Venom are said to be around middle but can sometimes be higher. Temperature should be high 70 around 80 since some orginate from Africa.

Once they make aburrow they rarely much, for my experience. Burrowers a lot some terrestrial.
That's a lot of info for a post that isn't factual. ;)

I'm interested in knowing where the non-African ones come from?

Steve
 

phoenixxavierre

Arachnoprince
Old Timer
Joined
Oct 9, 2002
Messages
1,293
Humidity levels

Hi all,

Humidity levels should not be mistaken with precipitation.

It is quite common for humidity to reach 90% at nighttime in Tanzania. It has been that way for the last month across the entire country. It does lessen during the day, lowering down to 55%-65%, due to the sun dissipating the moisture in the air. About once a month there is a good downpour that lasts a week or so. That's when everything gets drenched. Eastern Africa is not nearly as dry as northern Africa.

In captivity it's fairly easy to raise up humidity in the evening on the inside of a tank. Simply cover nearly the entire top of the lid and condensation will rise. You can use glass, cardboard, books, whatever is easiest for you. During the day, remove the obstacle and the humidity in the air will dissipate (unless of course your ambient humidity is high to begin with). You can find what your ambient humidity is with a humidity guage, or if you're like me and have your windows open all the time, you can look at the humidity level in your particular town/city on any weather website.

Those who prefer to keep their animals bone dry avoid these "complications" altogether. In fact, bone dry is absolutely necessary in some situations (mite infestations).

Best wishes,

Paul
 
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