Giant isopods?

roach dude

Arachnobaron
Old Timer
Joined
Jan 5, 2005
Messages
401
Im thinking of making a miniture rainfost and was wondering if their was sucha thing as a large/giant isopod? The things i was thinking about putting in this is some milipedes,cockroaches and anyhting else that isnt carniveroise and would live well with the other insects....:D {D :D
 

P.jasonius

Arachnobaron
Old Timer
Joined
Nov 19, 2006
Messages
423
There is a european spp (terrestrial) that gets close to an inch long, but I gave up looking for a source of them. British species I think. I'll look around and see if I can find the species name, can't remember off the top of my head.
 

Kevin_Davies

Arachnoknight
Old Timer
Joined
Jun 15, 2006
Messages
213
Yeah, theres a species native here that gets around an inch, Sea Slaters, Ligia Oceanica, they live near the sea, Ive found them a few times, I would think theyre common near where I live.
 

P.jasonius

Arachnobaron
Old Timer
Joined
Nov 19, 2006
Messages
423
Those are exactly the ones I was talking about. You beat me to it. I couldn't find anyone that could supply me with any (nudge, nudge, wink, wink):rolleyes:
[edit] ...hint, hint...
 

roach dude

Arachnobaron
Old Timer
Joined
Jan 5, 2005
Messages
401
O yea sea slaters i have caught them befor..very very fast, i was thingy more of ones that would live in darm damp places not near the sea, might just notg et any isopods to go in their!:?
 

Vermis

Arachnoknight
Old Timer
Joined
Dec 11, 2005
Messages
191
You can get isopods up to a foot and a half long. Trouble is, they prefer deep seas to rainforest setups. ;)

Dartfrog sells isopod cultures. Thing is, the biggest species they have only gets to 16mm ('only', compared to some tropical millipedes and roaches), which just about matches the biggest 'wild' woodlice I've seen about here.
Maybe try Trichorhina tomentosa? They're not huge, but they're an attractive colour and I've heard of people keeping them with their roach colonies.
 

Elytra and Antenna

Arachnoking
Old Timer
Joined
Sep 12, 2002
Messages
2,251
There's a native US species that approaches an inch that will probably be available from one or two isopod vendors in the next six months.
 

Kevin_Davies

Arachnoknight
Old Timer
Joined
Jun 15, 2006
Messages
213










Ligia oceanica, these are very impressive for woodlice, much larger than any ive seen before, from the info ive found it states theyre the largest of the oniscid (terrestrial) woodlice.
 

C_Strike

Arachnobaron
Old Timer
Joined
Jun 8, 2005
Messages
445
Hi kevin, i dont spose you fancy sending a few down my way?
Im very interested in these big, native isopods. my problem is getting to th ecoast 'tis a pain atm. hehe
 

Kevin_Davies

Arachnoknight
Old Timer
Joined
Jun 15, 2006
Messages
213
Hi kevin, i dont spose you fancy sending a few down my way?
Im very interested in these big, native isopods. my problem is getting to th ecoast 'tis a pain atm. hehe
i dont see why not, i'll pm you now.
 

bugmankeith

Arachnoking
Old Timer
Joined
Jun 4, 2006
Messages
2,731
Those sea slaters look very similar to an isopod I find in my yard, except your are bigger. Amazing how they both evolved to live in different places.
 

Galapoheros

ArachnoGod
Old Timer
Joined
Jul 4, 2005
Messages
8,991
Those Sea Slaters look very familiar. I see a species of those (pretty sure) running around the docks on S. Padre Island here in Tx. I think they are about an inch long. I caught one a few years back to take a closer look at it. Very fast and alert to being approached, ...hard to catch. I go down there almost every year. I'll try to catch some next time.
 

P.jasonius

Arachnobaron
Old Timer
Joined
Nov 19, 2006
Messages
423
The most successful species of (terrestrial) isopod in N. America is Armadillidium vulgare, and can be found almost anywhere that is moist. The second most is Porcellio scaber. What do these have in common? They were both introduced here from Europe.
Point? It is very possible that the isopods you saw were L. oceania (spelling?), though I haven't heard of them being introduced.
--
Oh, anyone interested should really check out pics of the 'giant isopod' in googles image search. Highly reflective eyes, they look like an evil roly poly.
i want to eat one.
 

Galapoheros

ArachnoGod
Old Timer
Joined
Jul 4, 2005
Messages
8,991
Well I'll try to catch some next time to post so we can check'em out. Whatever they are, I can see how they could very easily hitch a ride on boats from over seas. They move allot like roaches and are wary like most roaches. They were definitely isopods. Looked like giant, inch long sow bugs.
 

Gigas

Arachnoprince
Old Timer
Joined
Apr 6, 2006
Messages
1,977
I'm not sure how well the shore isopods will do away from the sea, obviously there will need to be a salt substitute but i'm not sure how easy it will be to switch their diet.
 

C_Strike

Arachnobaron
Old Timer
Joined
Jun 8, 2005
Messages
445
Well, im hoping that the fact therer isnt much evolutionary changes 'tween the terrestrial ones and aquatic ones *Correct me if im wrong please* they might not find it too intense a change. only one way to find out though ->experimentation!
 

Gigas

Arachnoprince
Old Timer
Joined
Apr 6, 2006
Messages
1,977
That is true, its the only way you will know for sure, but maybe there is a reason you only find them on the seawed and not further up the beach on the grassy areas.
 

roach dude

Arachnobaron
Old Timer
Joined
Jan 5, 2005
Messages
401
That is true, its the only way you will know for sure, but maybe there is a reason you only find them on the seawed and not further up the beach on the grassy areas.
I dont think sea slater only live in seawead, everytime i found them was on big rocks near the sea, dont think i saw any seaweed new anywho..:?
 

Gigas

Arachnoprince
Old Timer
Joined
Apr 6, 2006
Messages
1,977
Sorry I didn't mean seaweed but more vegetation which grows as saltwater as its major water source,
 
Top