Getting Started

Xenon Leah M

Arachnopeon
Joined
Feb 10, 2017
Messages
2
I would like to know what species of tarantula would make the best first pet. Also, any tips on getting things ready, like housing and basic keeping, would be helpful. So, please let me know what your thoughts and advice are.
 

EulersK

Arachnonomicon
Staff member
Joined
Feb 22, 2013
Messages
3,290
Great beginner species were already suggested above, so here's some more info.

Terrestrial setup:


Substrate (the dirt):


Tools you'll need:


Molting, and what is expected of you:


And finally, scientific names so you can actually talk to us about what you have:


Much more efficient than us regurgitating information every time these questions are asked :D If you have questions after all of that, by all means post in here.
 

Chris LXXIX

ArachnoGod
Active Member
Joined
Dec 25, 2014
Messages
5,689
Great beginner species were already suggested above, so here's some more info.

Terrestrial setup:


Substrate (the dirt):


Tools you'll need:


Molting, and what is expected of you:


And finally, scientific names so you can actually talk to us about what you have:


Much more efficient than us regurgitating information every time these questions are asked :D If you have questions after all of that, by all means post in here.
You are "burrowing" your YT takeover that not even Al Capone when he decided to took Chicago. Bravo :)
 

petkokc

Arachnosquire
Joined
Apr 13, 2015
Messages
79
I already shamelessly self-promote my video yesterday...can't do it 2 days in a row D:
 

EulersK

Arachnonomicon
Staff member
Joined
Feb 22, 2013
Messages
3,290
I already shamelessly self-promote my video yesterday...can't do it 2 days in a row D:
Better to direct newbies to proper T videos rather than the terrible advice ones. Fine then, I'll do it for you :D

If you choose to get an arboreal T:


Eating issues:


Nonsense you'll hear as "advice":
 

Moakmeister

Arachnolord
Joined
Oct 6, 2016
Messages
632
Get a Grammostola pulchripes.
"I'll look into that species. Do you have any other sugges-"
"Shhhh.... G r a m m o s t o l a p u l c h r i p e s"
 

Arachnomaniac19

Arachnolord
Joined
Aug 23, 2014
Messages
654
If you tell us what qualities in a spider you're looking for, this will help narrow your search down quite a bit.
 

Moakmeister

Arachnolord
Joined
Oct 6, 2016
Messages
632
Yeah but all jokes aside, what kind of tarantula were you looking for? One that'll get big, or one that stays on the smaller side? What color sounds the best?
 

Xenon Leah M

Arachnopeon
Joined
Feb 10, 2017
Messages
2
Thanks, guys. I'm looking for a spider that can be handled, requires low humidity, and is fairly hardy overall. Slow but active is good, too.
 

Chris LXXIX

ArachnoGod
Active Member
Joined
Dec 25, 2014
Messages
5,689
I'm looking for a spider that can be handled
Doesn't exist one. Remember, "everyone" handled everything out there, someone can even handle a S.calceatum or a S.aruana. But overall, at the end of the day, doesn't exist a "particular" Theraphosidae that "can be handled". Not even the most benign ones. They don't need that.
 

EulersK

Arachnonomicon
Staff member
Joined
Feb 22, 2013
Messages
3,290
Aphonopelma chalcodes. As always :rolleyes: Bone dry substrate, fairly docile (but don't make handling a routine), and the definition of hardy. Oh, and adult females go for $50-$75. You live in Arizona? You could find one for free outside if you looked hard enough. The common name is literally Tuscon Blonde.

 

Ungoliant

Malleus Aranearum
Staff member
Joined
Mar 7, 2012
Messages
3,825
I'm looking for a spider that can be handled, requires low humidity, and is fairly hardy overall. Slow but active is good, too.
For those needs, I would recommend the following genera: Euathlus, Grammostola, Aphonopelma, and Brachypelma. Hardiness will be improved if you get a juvenile (2" or bigger). Sling care is not rocket science, but some people can be impatient with slow growers. A good place to find tarantulas is to read the reviews and classifieds. If you have any exotic pet shows nearby, that can be a great place to find reasonably priced tarantulas. (I prefer to buy them in person.)

Juveniles and adults of those species are hardy and can be kept on dry substrate with a hide and a water dish. The distance from the top of the substrate to the lid should not exceed 1.5 times the diagonal leg span (DLS) of the tarantula. Excessive horizontal space won't hurt the tarantula as long as the enclosure has appropriate furnishings. However, 3x DLS in any horizontal direction is plenty of space for a tarantula.

Slings can be kept in condiment or deli cups on slightly damp substrate. A water dish is fine if it fits. If not, they will drink moisture from the sides of the container and/or the substrate. Slings will take pre-killed prey (or parts of prey) if they are still too skittish to hunt.

As far as handling is concerned, most experienced keepers do not recommend handling tarantulas, as it provides no benefit to the tarantula but does increase the risk of injury or escape. (Tarantulas, especially bulkier ones, can suffer a lethal abdominal rupture from a fall onto a hard surface.)

Nonetheless, we recognize that new keepers sometimes want to handle their tarantulas. Just try to keep it to a minimum, and always do so no more than a few inches above a soft surface. Keep a catch-cup nearby.
 

Moakmeister

Arachnolord
Joined
Oct 6, 2016
Messages
632
Thanks, guys. I'm looking for a spider that can be handled, requires low humidity, and is fairly hardy overall. Slow but active is good, too.
"Can be handled" is an iffy stat. Lots of tarantulas will allow you to handle them, but handling can lead to you dropping the spider. There IS a species called Euathlus sp. red that wanders out of its enclosure onto your hand every single time you open the lid, almost to the point where it looks like it ENJOYS being handled, but this tarantula gets to a max size of 3.5 inches.
 

Moakmeister

Arachnolord
Joined
Oct 6, 2016
Messages
632
For those needs, I would recommend the following genera: Euathlus, Grammostola, Aphonopelma, and Brachypelma. Hardiness will be improved if you get a juvenile (2" or bigger). Sling care is not rocket science, but some people can be impatient with slow growers. A good place to find tarantulas is to read the reviews and classifieds. If you have any exotic pet shows nearby, that can be a great place to find reasonably priced tarantulas. (I prefer to buy them in person.)

Juveniles and adults of those species are hardy and can be kept on dry substrate with a hide and a water dish. The distance from the top of the substrate to the lid should not exceed 1.5 times the diagonal leg span (DLS) of the tarantula.

Slings can be kept in condiment or deli cups on slightly damp substrate. A water dish is fine if it fits. If not, they will drink moisture from the sides of the container and/or the substrate. Slings will take pre-killed prey (or parts of prey) if they are still too skittish to hunt.

As far as handling is concerned, most experienced keepers do not recommend handling tarantulas, as it provides no benefit to the tarantula but does increase the risk of injury or escape. (Tarantulas, especially bulkier ones, can suffer a lethal abdominal rupture from a fall onto a hard surface.)

Nonetheless, we recognize that new keepers sometimes want to handle their tarantulas. Just try to keep it to a minimum, and always do so no more than a few inches above a soft surface. Keep a catch-cup nearby.
I always thought you could just keep your had IN the enclosure, on the substrate, so if the T decides to walk off, it just steps onto the ground.
 

Ungoliant

Malleus Aranearum
Staff member
Joined
Mar 7, 2012
Messages
3,825
I always thought you could just keep your had IN the enclosure, on the substrate, so if the T decides to walk off, it just steps onto the ground.
Sure you could (if it's a big enough enclosure), but that's a good way to end up with urticating hairs on your hand.
 

SpiderSling2017

Arachnopeon
Joined
Jan 28, 2017
Messages
19
It's up to you really and depends on your preferences

Do you like Fast or slow growers?

Heavy or light webbers?

Docile or more territorial?

Aboreal or Terrestrial?

Personally my first is a Euathlus SP. Red, slow growing, very docile and tolerates handling, decent eaters, doesn't require much care, room temp is said to be fine, slightly overfill water dish to create slight humidity.
 
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