getting some new T's...advice please

arachnophile223

Arachnoknight
Joined
Oct 14, 2010
Messages
224
i found a 5" obt and a 4" colbalt blue for 60$ both are adult females. my quesion about the obt is do they prefer to burrow? or would they be happy with a burrow-like hide? i know both species tend to be rather aggressive lol. and colbalt blue i've read are best for more experienced keepers. why is that? is it because they are aggressive? or because of the humidity requirements? or because they tend to escape? or all of the above or what? lol anyway i would appreciate some advice on the care of both.
 

malevolentrobot

Arachnobaron
Old Timer
Joined
Jan 21, 2010
Messages
310
i think the combination of their care being slightly more difficult than an average NW (new world) terrestrial because of their humidity requirements, combined with their highly defensive nature, makes for a statement that the cobalt blue, H. lividum, is "harder" to take care of. i don't have experience in these matters personally though, because i have no interest in a fossorial species... so i'll let another keeper chime in on that.

i have also never heard of H. lividum having more of a proclivity to escaping than other tarantulas. escape is usually a situation of oppertunity, so just be adequately prepared when the enclosure lid comes off. i suppose if you mean roaming around, hanging from their screen and giving the possible illusion of wanting to escape, etc. as some have posted here, it probably has to do with inadequate substrate levels and the fact the tarantula hasn't acclimated to its enclosure yet or made a burrow (which H. lividum should do, eventually).

as far as your OBT goes, P. murinus seem to do whatever they please. i set up mine as semi-arboreal, hoping it would take on arboreal tendancies and web up the enclosure as many people have posted pictures of here, but sadly mine is of the burrowing type. i'm lucky if i see little orange legs poking out of her burrow once a week.

she is very reclusive, and hard to irritate (heck, she made a three hour trip with no incident when we moved in her enclosure because we weighed the risks versus trying to catch her and put her back in later!), but when she is... it is very impressive, fangs out, slapping the substrate, very fascinating to watch.
 
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Spidershane1

Arachnoknight
Joined
Apr 11, 2010
Messages
170
I've kept & am keeping several of both of these species and heres my pointers. OBTs dont need a hide, they most always tend to make their own web tubes/tunnels to chill in(except very old specimens, which should be given a premade hide). Just make sure to place a few sticks/banches/logs or whatever just so she can web it up and make her own little den out of what you offer her. Cobalts on the other hand will burrow deep holes if you give them deep substrate, but this is not always required. I have one right now in just a couple inches of substrate, but she has a foot or so long hollowed out log that she almost always stays in and webs over the ends. Cobalts are very shy, so either give her room to burrow, or a VERY secretive hide. As far as humidity, OBTs like it dry so you dont really need to mist as long as you have a water bowl. Anywhere between 40%-60% humidity would be fine. Cobalts on the other hand like it more moist, so keep it above 70%. And I think the reason that people consider cobalts an advanced species is that they get freakin mean when you bother them. They are very shy and like to chill, but get rather, errrm, angry lol when you bug em. Of all my T's(I have quite a few) my cobalt is the most intimidating. Good luck with your new T's, they are both amazing species and you will enjoy them.
 

shanebp

Arachnobaron
Old Timer
Joined
Dec 14, 2009
Messages
353
I don't have experience with a cobalt blue, but I have had experience with OBTs. They are extremely hardy and easy to take of, and they will adapt to whatever situation you subject them to whether it be terrestrial OR arborial. But the reason they are dubbed for experience keepers is because of their nature. They have medically signigicant bites, they are moreso on the defensive side, and they move like sonic on speed. If you don't respect them and treat them according to their personality, you'll most likely pay the price of ignorance, whether that be a bite, an escape, or a good scare.
 

Royal_T's

Arachnoknight
Old Timer
Joined
Oct 9, 2008
Messages
187
Both tarantulas you mentioned are old world species and suggested for experienced keepers due to the fact that they have more potent venom and are more apt to bite rather than kick urticating hairs. Haplopelma lividum are obligate burrowers (meaning that they have to be allowed to make their own burrow) Pterinochilus murinus are opportunistic burrowers and will use a hide but tend to construct hides made of webbing and substrate.
 

US Arachnids

Arachnoknight
Old Timer
Joined
Oct 1, 2008
Messages
253
I would have to say that neither of those species are hard to take care of and I would have to also say that those species arent necessarily more for "Experienced Keepers" thats an understatement. Obviously neither of those T's would be a good recommendation for a starter T.

But the only difference is how careful you are around them when you are caring for them and doing maintenance since they have a huge attitude, My personal opinion there is no "Experienced Keeper" If you were going to compair someone thats been into the hobby for 2-6 years compaired to a novice then I guess you could have some experience that way. Other than that someone that has been into the hobby for 2 years can have just as much experience as someone thats been into the hobby for 7 years...

It all depends on how careful you are and how much you involve your self into the hobby and get use to them.
Thats really the only difference
 
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