G. Rosea question

indigoeyes

Arachnosquire
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Mar 10, 2003
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I had a question about substrate for G. Roseas. I'm currently using a type of woodchips that the pet store recommended. But I have seen other pet stores using black sand. I wanted to make a little "beach" around Ophelia's water dish in black sand. Is this okay to use? Will it stick to the hairs on her legs?
Thanx!
 

JDK

Arachnosquire
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Jan 2, 2003
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Pet stores

Let me be the first to say this. Pet stores are generaly Ditsy and oblivious to the world around them. Sand is considered "bad" because it has the potential to rupture the abdomen of your rosey. Wood chips? I mean Really. This is Directed at the complete and utter stupididy of pet stores and their ignorance of the animals they possess. Wood chips are again rough and have the potential to rip the abdomen. No cotton or sponge in the water dish either. Just in case:) Peat moss & potting soil work the best mixed together. Make sure each are free of chemicals.
 

ant1gen

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Mar 2, 2003
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If the wood chips are pine or cedar, throw them away. If they are aspen, coconut (I know, not wood, but..), or the repti-bark type stuff, save it for the scorps or herps you're sure to get as part of the usual sequelae of this hobby.... ;-)

Sand isn't necessarily a good item for any number of reasons. Since the spider really doesn't care for the aesthetics of it's surroundings, if you need something more eye-catching, buy a modled little pond thingy at the local pet shop and use it.

Looks good, less deadly.
 

Fungii

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Feb 14, 2003
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So what is it about pine or cedar that tarantulas hate so much? I purchased some potting soil that had wood chips in it, used it in their terrariums and you could tell they hated it. All of them were climbing the glass and acting stressed out. So I had to go out and get potting soil without the wood chips and replace all their substrates. What a pain, I'll never do that again! :mad:
 

Code Monkey

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Pine and cedar can give off aromatic compounds that are an insecticide (interferes with the moulting process). It isn't known if these compounds affect arachnids or not but it's best to avoid them to be on the safe side.

If, as has been said, you were using coconut coir and not a coniferous product (aspen is free of these compounds), any avoidance behavior is probably due to their general dislike of almost any substrate for a few days until they lay down a fresh layer of silk.
 

Fungii

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Feb 14, 2003
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Thanks for the info Code Monkey. I left them with the wood chip soil for a couple weeks, but they never got used to it. When I replaced their soil, it was like night and day, they totally "moved in" with the new substrate.
 

phoenixxavierre

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Originally posted by indigoeyes
I had a question about substrate for G. Roseas. I'm currently using a type of woodchips that the pet store recommended. But I have seen other pet stores using black sand. I wanted to make a little "beach" around Ophelia's water dish in black sand. Is this okay to use? Will it stick to the hairs on her legs?
Thanx!
Hi indigoeyes,

Woodchips are generally considered a risky thing when it comes to substrate for tarantulas. I personally use peat moss/potting soil mixes, and sometimes peat moss/potting soil/sand mixes.

If you use sand, a type of play sand, like you get at a gardening center, just plain old sand box sand, no types of additives, then you should be okay. I used a mixture of 50% peat, 25% potting soil, 25% sand for two chilean rose females and they loved the substrate, digging enormous burrows in it. I also had success breeding this species on this type of substrate. The sand shouldn't harm the tarantula, though there have been cases where the ventral side of the abdomen of a tarantula has had a spot worn onto it from long exposure upon gravel or pure sand, and also from long-term overly damp conditions. I have never had these problems though I have heard of it happening.

At any rate, definitely steer clear of the bark and go with peat, it has great anti-mite properties as well!

Take care,

Paul
 

indigoeyes

Arachnosquire
Old Timer
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Mar 10, 2003
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149
Thank you everyone for your insight! It was very helpful. I just ran out to the store and got totaly organic soil and peat moss for her. She's climbing the side of the tank, but I think she'll be fine in a few days. I will be sure to keep you all posted on how Ophelia likes her new home and will post pictures as soon as I get them.

Thanks again! You are all great!:)
 
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