Future new spides

SpiderFood

Arachnoknight
Old Timer
Joined
Mar 26, 2003
Messages
274
hello all, my name is dale and pretty soon its my birthday, my wife has decided to buy me a bunch of new spides. WOW!, and I am posting here to get opinions, suggestions, and advice on the chosen species.
1. P. ornata
2. P. faciatum
3. P. rufilata
4. P. regalis
5. H. maculata
6. A. metallica
7. A. bicoloratum
8. T blondi
9. C. crawshayii
10. P. irminia
11. P. miranda

these arent definite but they sure would be great additions. care advise and experiences are wonderfully welcomed. thanx.
 

alidpayne

Arachnoknight
Old Timer
Joined
Apr 12, 2003
Messages
152
I highly recomend the A. metallica and an A. Versicolor and a Chromatopelma cyaneopubescens

My opinion may not count much though, since those are the ones I want, and I am your wife. So I have a little bit of an unfair interest in the outcome of this little poll.


A.D. Payne
 

Weapon-X

Arachnodemon
Old Timer
Joined
Jul 19, 2002
Messages
774
re

in my opinion those are all awesome species, the miranda will be pricy but worth it for sure--Jeff
 

invertepet

Arachnolord
Old Timer
Joined
Oct 4, 2002
Messages
608
1. P. ornata
A really nice variant of the 'Ornamental' genus Poecilotheria. Gets quite large and long-legged (less 'fuzzy' than P. rufilata) and has striking red hairs on the palps and a darker but better contrasted variegated pattern on the legs.

2. P. fasciata
Almost identical to P. regalis except for being just a half-shade more brownish - more of a 'warm' black & white pattern with slightly less contrast... But only very slightly so. Isn't the largest Poec, a bit smaller bodied than regalis.

3. P. rufilata
Some say it's the largest ornamental. Very fluffy, beautiful variegated shades of greenish-yellow, grey, black, etc. Probably one of the most 'different' looking of the genus. As spiderlings, they tend to be a little less hardy than some of the others. Airflow without dryness is key.

4. P. regalis
The most well-known and readily available Poec. Gets fairly large (I have an 8" breeder female) and as adults their patterns get quite striking, with the 'whites' being lighter and 'blacks' being darker than other members of the genus. The underside of the front legs is a brilliant yellow and there's a cream colored band across the anterior-most section of the abdomen (underside). As with all Poecilotheria, it's capable of inflicting a bite that can have rather serious side-effects. Be careful!

5. H. maculata
Beautiful but also thought to have a nasty bite. Pretty hardy but rather secretive if given a refuge it can hide in. Some keepers say they never see theirs!

6. A. metallica
Big beautiful fuzzy Avicularia. Docile and impressive by any standards. Metallic blue coloration and fuzzy white-tipped hairs. Also fairly hardy.

7. A. bicoloratum
A spider that just doesn't get enough attention. Some specimen of this genus are just stunningly red and black. Others are more faded orange-tan, but coloration also varies depending on proximity to molt and sex. Not a huge spider, but definitely one of the more beautiful species that ranks right up there with B. smithi and B. boehmei.

8. T blondi
If you want the biggest damned spider anyone has ever seen, that makes visitors stop and say "WHAT THE HELL IS THAT?!" - then this is it. Nice russet-reddish brown color to blackish (again, depending on molt proximity) and can attain sizes of around 10" or more with a heavy bulky build. Not docile by any means, but manageable if you get used to them (and wear gloves, because those hairs are unbearable if you get them in your hands). Care is a little tricky. Heat should be in the mid to upper 70's with a decent hide/refuge and a BIG waterdish but relatively moderate humidity (don't over-saturate the substrate or over-mist). Another key is keeping the water clean, as they have a tendency to foul it, drink and get sick.

9. C. crawshayii
Again, care can be tricky (definitely needs to be allowed to burrow and water must be provided at all times with moderate humidity and definitely no saturates substrate). Heat should be a little higher than T. blondi, around 80, but due to the burrowing habits, it might be prudent to position an undertank heater away from the burrow. Kick-ass looker with short silky brick-red hairs, light white banding on the patella joints and 'elephantine' rear legs that are super-thick.

10. P. irminia
One of the most uniquely colored spiders. Jet black with those cool orange 'racing stripes' on the tarsal segments and abdomen. Can be prone to biting and being quite fast/jittery. This species does need higher humidity and fairly regular misting or an elevated water dish/cup, but again as with all arboreal tree spiders, airflow is a must to prevent stagnation of the air.

11. P. miranda
If the price doesn't stop you, it's the newest and most talked-about Poec available in the trade. Similar to P. regalis or subfusca but without any black on the patellas, giving it a kind of 'white leg warmer' look. Nice striking contrast as adults.

bill
 

RugbyDave

Arachnoprince
Old Timer
Joined
Apr 5, 2003
Messages
1,428
My friend just got miranda, and he paid quite a load for it, but its gorgeous -- amazing spider -- typical Poec, but i think the colouration is stunning!

amazing amazing find if you can really snag one!

good luck!
peace
 

vulpina

Arachnoprince
Old Timer
Joined
Jan 26, 2003
Messages
1,945
My P.regalis is a very good looking spider, it's a 7.5" female, they have a bad bite, but aren't too bad to keep. Mine hides behind a cork bark the she put up a curtain of web around, so she isn't seen too often, at night she comes out. My H. maculata is FAST!!! and rather defensive always going to a threat posture, good feeder and hides behind it's bark alot, does not seem to web as much as my regalis. T. blondi, mine is fairly mellow, sits at the entrance to her borrow alot, good feeder. C. crawshayi, you will never see this one, mine is always in it's borrow, except at night. And the P. irminia, mine hides alot in it's web it built on the bark, it does come out in the daytime when food is introduced. Hope this helps, I would agree with your wife, C. cyaneopubescens is an awesome choice!!

Andy
 
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