Funniest thing you've seen a T do

The Grym Reaper

Arachnoreaper
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Jul 19, 2016
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:astonished:
Looks like me after doing maintenance in my B.smithi enclosure :shifty:
Mine has never kicked hairs, she used to be one of my most chilled Tarantulas (if you gently tapped her back leg with tongs to get her to move she wouldn't even flinch) but since her last moult she's turned into a right grump and now she threat postures and slaps the ground at the slightest things.
 

Formerphobe

Arachnoking
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Feb 27, 2011
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B verdezi female stands in her water bowl to bathe, repeatedly dipping into the water as she grooms herself. She's also a heavy webber. The webbing in her enclosure rivals that of her OBT shelf mate.

B boehmei has a ping pong ball that she moves about her enclosure- in the hide, out the hide, top of the hide, in the water bowl...

A geniculata has "toys" that she moves about, buries, digs up to relocate, etc. She buried her pink plastic lizard several months ago, recently dug it up and reburied it on the other side of her enclosure.

B klaasi will stack all her stuff in a pile (hide, bowl, plastic plant, ping pong ball, etc) and use the pile to try to get leverage to push her lid off. Then, she'll move the whole pile to the other side of the enclosure and try again. She's escaped twice over the past few years, even from a locking lid.
 

Andrea82

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Jan 12, 2016
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B verdezi female stands in her water bowl to bathe, repeatedly dipping into the water as she grooms herself. She's also a heavy webber. The webbing in her enclosure rivals that of her OBT shelf mate.

B boehmei has a ping pong ball that she moves about her enclosure- in the hide, out the hide, top of the hide, in the water bowl...

A geniculata has "toys" that she moves about, buries, digs up to relocate, etc. She buried her pink plastic lizard several months ago, recently dug it up and reburied it on the other side of her enclosure.

B klaasi will stack all her stuff in a pile (hide, bowl, plastic plant, ping pong ball, etc) and use the pile to try to get leverage to push her lid off. Then, she'll move the whole pile to the other side of the enclosure and try again. She's escaped twice over the past few years, even from a locking lid.
How you manage to get away from observing your T's is beyond me...I'd be glued to the glass 24/7 :D
 

Jerry

Arachnobaron
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Jan 1, 2016
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594
Had my b vagans bolt out of his burrow while I was removing boluses and filling water snatch a bolus from my tongs realized it wasn't a live cricket drop it and bolt back to his burrow my wife found me laughing uncontrollable
 

WhyUBiteBite

Arachnosquire
Joined
Feb 14, 2017
Messages
104
Not entirley T behavior but the funniest and scariest moment for me was after I drank down an entire energy drink (I'm sensitive to caffiene) and went to feed my Stirmi. Hes a little guy but like to live in his dark underlog space and strikes out from it. Well long story short I couldn't find my 18" tongs so I was trying to use a 8" zip tie to coax a cricket into his hide entrance...he hit the zip tie hard enough I felt the bite into the zip tie on my end. I damn near screamed, dropped the zip tie and shoved the lid shut as I fell backwards...to this day my wife has not let me forget it lol. It's always the one you least expect that throws you for one lol.
 

Formerphobe

Arachnoking
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How you manage to get away from observing your T's is beyond me...I'd be glued to the glass 24/7 :D
LOL
Well, I have been known to disappear into the spider room for hours on end.
You collect enough of them and there's always bound to be one of them up to something.
 

Charlie69

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Oct 1, 2016
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85
I was looking at my A geroldi grooming. He was very relaxed, moving slowly. Suddenly he stopped moving, with his foot still in his mouth. He sat like that for quite some time, sucking his toe.
First time I tried to fill my G laeta's waterdish. She jumped out of the enclosure grabbed the pipe Of the water can and bit it. Several times. Lucky I stayed calm, got her back in the enclosure with a fishnet. Wet and angry :))
 

Lokee85

Arachnoknight
Joined
Feb 8, 2017
Messages
195
My b. albo sling jumped out and attacked a drop of water that fell on her burrow entrance, and she and my b. vagans both twerk it all the way up the side of their burrow windows when webbing lol.

Also, when I first got my 2" juvie a. avic and got him in his new home, he started climbing all around the enclosure and lost his footing over the water bowl. He fell into the water and immediately jumped out, turned around and started slapping the water. :happy:
 

MetallicArachnid

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Jan 22, 2016
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51
Not necessarily an uncommon thing but I find it amusing when they throw such a violent threat display at the water that they end up on their backs, not that I like tormenting my spiders but it's freakin' water and you see it every couple of days.
 

Moakmeister

Arachnodemon
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Oct 6, 2016
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Not necessarily an uncommon thing but I find it amusing when they throw such a violent threat display at the water that they end up on their backs, not that I like tormenting my spiders but it's freakin' water and you see it every couple of days.
makes me wonder what they do when it rains. Do they not have any ability to discern water from other animals? And why do they flip on their back during a threat posture? That'll sure scare the enemies away, falling over into a defenseless position that really doesn't look scary at all. Tarantulas are stupid, man.
 

Moakmeister

Arachnodemon
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Mine has never kicked hairs, she used to be one of my most chilled Tarantulas (if you gently tapped her back leg with tongs to get her to move she wouldn't even flinch) but since her last moult she's turned into a right grump and now she threat postures and slaps the ground at the slightest things.
I'd rather have a NW that threat poses than kicks hairs. Hair-kicking is actually dangerous and threat poses actually look cool.
 

MetallicArachnid

Arachnosquire
Joined
Jan 22, 2016
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makes me wonder what they do when it rains. Do they not have any ability to discern water from other animals? And why do they flip on their back during a threat posture? That'll sure scare the enemies away, falling over into a defenseless position that really doesn't look scary at all. Tarantulas are stupid, man.
Right? I mean if they're going to bite you'd think they'd want to stay standing upright and not where I could easily eat them if I was a predator.
 

Moakmeister

Arachnodemon
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Oct 6, 2016
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Right? I mean if they're going to bite you'd think they'd want to stay standing upright and not where I could easily eat them if I was a predator.
Maybe they do it because they just fall. If the predator is above them they reach up higher to try to show the red setae under their chelicerae.
 

MetallicArachnid

Arachnosquire
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Jan 22, 2016
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Maybe they do it because they just fall. If the predator is above them they reach up higher to try to show the red setae under their chelicerae.
Might have to do with them trying to put on a more impressive display to a large predator...or perceived predator but definitely doesn't do them any good in the long run, they'd be better off turning tail and running.
 

The Grym Reaper

Arachnoreaper
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Jul 19, 2016
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I'd rather have a NW that threat poses than kicks hairs. Hair-kicking is actually dangerous and threat poses actually look cool.
As funny as it is to watch her go mental, it actually makes rehousing somewhat of a pain in the arse.
 

Giles52

Arachnopeon
Joined
Aug 1, 2016
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7
The enclosure my B. Smithi is in has narrow slits on the side for ventilation instead of holes. Today I saw him stick his fangs through those slits. I could actually see them on the other side. He did it a few times before moving on and chilling with his plant.
 
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